The Truth About Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA)

0 Shares

Most urologists in conventional medicine place high emphasis on the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test to determine prostate health. Even though researchers have placed substantial doubts on the validity and reliability of the PSA test, conventional doctors continue to use the test and rely on it to determine male prostate health.

Here is the point: The literature says a low PSA number of about four indicates a normal or healthy prostate, whereas higher numbers put prostate health in doubt and even suggests malignancy. A higher number, of course, calls for biopsy and may lead to prostate surgery.

Yet some men may have prostate malignancy with very low PSA numbers or no malignancy with very high PSA numbers.

This makes the whole test doubtful. I personally would not rely on the PSA test and would certainly refuse prostate surgery based on it — or even biopsy at my age, 81.

Many men have been ruined because of prostate surgery. At the very least, all considerations of prostate surgery should be preceded by a detailed understanding of the pros and cons of relying on the PSA test.

There is not as much objection to the digital rectal exam (DRE) because no harm can result and a trained doctor can get a reasonable appraisal of prostate health by conducting a rectal prostate exam. Swelling and inflammation may be detected in most men particularly as they age.

Usually, a man can tell if he begins to have prostate swelling or benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) because of a noticeable restriction in his urine flow. Swelling of the prostate causes restriction of the urethra, which reduces urine flow. This becomes chronic in many men; and they may opt for green laser procedure to burn out that part of the prostate that is squeezing the urethra, restricting urine flow and creating urinary urgency, which disturbs sleep.

Green light laser is done as an outpatient surgery, but the patient is put to sleep for the procedure. Green light laser is fairly new but a better option. Be sure to select a urologist who has done several procedures.

Prostate cancer is risky for men, especially before about age 65. After that, the risk of death is reduced as age increases. The literature suggests that many men who die have prostate cancer, but it doesn’t kill them. They die of other causes. So older men should be very careful in selecting prostate surgery over doing nothing. Even younger men should not be unduly alarmed at a high PSA test because of the unreliability of the test.

Be careful of overaggressive treatments for early prostate cancer, including surgery and radiation therapy. Some side effects include urinary incontinence (inability to control urine flow), problems with bowel function, erectile dysfunction (loss of erections or erections that are inadequate for sexual intercourse) and infection.

Sad to say, there is no need for surgery anyway if it is determined that prostate cancer has already spread to other parts of the body before being detected.

Please remember that in the U.S., cancer is a multibillion-dollar industry; and establishment medicine will move quickly to capture potential cancer patients and involve them in the cancer-profit system. Fear is their major ruse.

I believe that prostate health is based on diet plus whether one is a smoker or heavy drinker. It’s obvious that unhealthy lifestyles will lead to unhealthy outcomes.

Fatty acid and stinging nettle (Cataplex F and Palmettoplex from Standard Process) are fundamental, in my view, to aid prostate health. Many chiropractors carry these products. Or use Googleto search for Standard Process to find someone near you who sells the product.

Personal Liberty

Bob Livingston

founder of Personal Liberty Digest™, is an ultra-conservative American author and editor of The Bob Livingston Letter™, in circulation since 1969. Bob has devoted much of his life to research and the quest for truth on a variety of subjects. Bob specializes in health issues such as nutritional supplements and alternatives to drugs, as well as issues of privacy (both personal and financial), asset protection and the preservation of freedom.

Join the Discussion

Comment Policy: We encourage an open discussion with a wide range of viewpoints, even extreme ones, but we will not tolerate racism, profanity or slanderous comments toward the author(s) or comment participants. Make your case passionately, but civilly. Please don't stoop to name calling. We use filters for spam protection. If your comment does not appear, it is likely because it violates the above policy or contains links or language typical of spam. We reserve the right to remove comments at our discretion.