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ProPublica: You Know Who Else Collected Metadata? The Stasi.

February 12, 2014 by  

This article, written by Julia Angwin, was originally published by ProPublica on Feb. 11.

The East German secret police, known as the Stasi, were an infamously intrusive secret police force. They amassed dossiers on about one quarter of the population of the country during the Communist regime.

stasi network analysisBut their spycraft, while incredibly invasive, was also technologically primitive by today’s standards. While researching my book Dragnet Nation, I obtained the above hand-drawn social network graph and other files from the Stasi Archive in Berlin, where German citizens can see files kept about them and media can access some files, with the names of the people who were monitored removed.

The graphic appears to be shows 46 connections, linking a target to various people: an “aunt,” “Operational Case Jentzsch” (presumably Bernd Jentzsch, an East German poet who defected to the West in 1976), places (“church”), and meetings (“by post, by phone, meeting in Hungary”).

Gary Bruce, an associate professor of history at the University of Waterloo and the author of The Firm: The Inside Story of the Stasi, helped me decode the graphic and other files. I was surprised at how crude the surveillance was. “Their main surveillance technology was mail, telephone and informants,” Bruce said.

Another file revealed a low-level surveillance operation called an im-forgang aimed at recruiting an unnamed target to become an informant. (The names of the targets were redacted; the names of the Stasi agents and informants were not.) In this case, the Stasi watched a rather boring high school student who lived with his mother and sister in a run-of-the-mill apartment. The Stasi obtained a report on him from the principal of his school and from a club where he was a member. But they didn’t have much on him. I’ve seen Facebook profiles with far more information.

A third file documented a surveillance operation known as an OPK, for Operative Personenkontrolle, of a man who was writing oppositional poetry. The Stasi deployed three informants against him but did not steam open his mail or listen to his phone calls. The regime collapsed before the Stasi could do anything further.

I also obtained a file that contained an “observation report,” in which Stasi agents recorded the movements of a 40-year-old man for two days Sept. 28 and 29, 1979. They watched him as he dropped off his laundry, loaded up his car with rolls of wallpaper and drove a child in a car “obeying the speed limit,” stopping for gas and delivering the wallpaper to an apartment building. The Stasi continued to follow the car as a woman drove the child back to Berlin.

The Stasi agent appears to have started following the target at 4:15 p.m. on a Friday. At 9:38 p.m., the target went into his apartment and turned out the lights. The agent stayed all night and handed over surveillance to another agent at 7 a.m. Saturday. That agent appears to have followed the target until 10 p.m. From today’s perspective, this seems like a lot of work for very little information.

And yet, the Stasi files are an important reminder of what a repressive regime can do with so little information. Here are the files:

Stasi File 1 Original

Stasi File 1 Translation

Stasi File 2 Original

Stasi File 2 Translation

Stasi Observation Report

Stasi Social Network Analysis

Translations by Yvonne Zivkovic and David Burnett

ProPublica

is an independent, non-profit newsroom that produces investigative journalism in the public interest. The organization’s work focuses exclusively on truly important stories, stories with “moral force.” ProPublica seeks to produce journalism that shines a light on exploitation of the weak by the strong and on the failures of those with power to vindicate the trust placed in them. ProPublica is headquartered in Manhattan. Its establishment was announced in October 2007. Operations commenced in January 2008, and publishing began in June 2008. http://www.propublica.org/

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