Comments Subscribe to Personal Liberty News Feed Subscribe to Personal Liberty
 

This Week in History


San Francisco And Aug. 2

Yesterday was Tony Bennett’s 84th birthday. In honor of the occasion let’s toast the city where he left his heart—San Francisco, the City by the Bay. On Aug. 2, 1873, the first San Francisco cable car began operating, on Clay Street between Kearny and Jones. San Fran was the first and the last city in […]

World War I And The World Stock Exchanges

The outbreak of World War I 96 years ago this month had a devastating effect on the world’s stock markets. Early in the morning of Friday, July 31, 1914, the London Stock Exchange announced that it would suspend trading until further notice—the first time the venerable center had done so in its century-long history. Stock […]

Ford's Model A

A revolution in transportation began on July 23, 1903, when Henry Ford sold his first automobile. The two-cylinder Model A, which cost all of $750, was delivered to Dr. Ernst Pfenning of Chicago. Unlike later versions of his famous assembly-line vehicles, which came in “any color you want, as long as it’s black,” the first […]

The Dawn Of The Atomic Age

The atomic age began on July 16, 1945, when scientists near Alamogordo, N.M., detonated the world’s first atomic bomb. One of the most massive (and most secret) programs of World War II had borne deadly fruit. President Harry S Truman was attending a summit conference in Potsdam, East Germany at the time. He was sent […]

The Showman P.T. Barnum

America’s greatest showman, Phineas T. Barnum, was born on July 5, 1810, in Bethel, Conn. This son of a shopkeeper began his career as an entertainer when, at the age of 25, he charged admission to see a blind and paralyzed former slave, Joice Heth. Barnum claimed the woman was 160 years old and the […]

The Treaty Of Versailles

On June 28, 1919, the First World War officially came to an end when France and Germany signed the Treaty of Versailles with the Allies. The German delegation, which had been forced to sign the punitive agreement, signaled their attitude by breaking the ceremonial pen. The treaty required Germany to pay such onerous reparations to […]

Not Worth A Continental

The Continental Congress was struggling to find funds and provisions for the Revolutionary forces when it decided to issue its own currency. On June 22, 1776, it issued $2 million in paper money. The currency featured the likeness of Revolutionary soldiers and carried the inscription, “The United Colonies.” The “Continentals,” as the bills were known, […]

The Magna Carta Established

It was nearly 800 years ago this week that King John of England, under pressure from a group of barons, agreed to put his seal on a document that, for the very first time in English history, limited the king’s powers by law. King John was one of Britain’s most unpopular monarchs. He devised numerous […]

“Tear Down This Wall!”

It was 23 years ago this week that President Ronald Reagan stood at the Brandenburg Gate in the divided city of Berlin and urged Mikhail Gorbachev, general secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, to "tear down this wall!" At the time, several members of the President’s staff opposed the remark. Chief of […]

Technology And The Census

On June 1, 1890, some 45,000 census workers set out to count every person then living in the United States. And for the first time they had modern technology to help in their efforts. Seems 30-year-old Herman Hollerith had invented a counting machine that worked faster than any method previously tried. It worked by punching […]

Bottom
close[X]

Sign Up For Personal Liberty Digest™!

PL Badge

Welcome to PersonalLiberty.com,
America's #1 Source for Libertarian News!

To join our group of freedom-loving individuals and to get alerts as well as late-breaking conservative news from Personal Liberty Digest™...

Privacy PolicyYou can opt out at any time. We protect your information like a mother hen. We will not sell or rent your email address to anyone for any reason.