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Suggested Reading


Government Schools Are Bad For Your Kids by James Ostrowski

Public schools today are crime-ridden, unhealthful places where children are exposed to sex, drugs and diseases and taught a sanitized version of American history and a loyalty to and dependence on big government, according to James Ostrowski in his book, Government Schools Are Bad For Your Kids.

Ostrowski is a trial and appellate lawyer and libertarian writer, and he has drawn on the works of the top libertarian thinkers and organizations in researching his book. He lays out a case that should give pause to anyone with children or grandchildren in today’s government-run school system.

The Unthinkable by Amanda Ripley

Each of us secretly hopes that, should we find ourselves facing a disaster, we would respond nobly if not heroically. And we certainly hope that we would never just freeze, like a deer caught in the headlights—or worse, panic.

But how we respond to crisis may be hardwired into our brain’s circuitry long before we’re confronted with a disaster situation. And while practice or preparation can help us to respond properly, we may have little actual control over what we do in a disaster.

That’s the conclusion of Amanda Ripley’s The Unthinkable, which has a subtitle: Who Survives When Disaster Strikes—And Why?

Ripley, an award-winning journalist for Time magazine, has covered some the world’s biggest disasters over the course of her career. In this book she retraces some of history’s biggest calamities—from the 1917 explosion of the munitions ship Mont Blanc, to plane crashes, calamitous fires, the 9/11 World Trade Center attacks, hostage situations and mass shootings—and studies people’s responses in an effort to find out why some survive the seemingly unsurvivable while others perish in situations where survival should have been assured.

The Federal Reserve Conspiracy by Antony C. Sutton

In The Federal Reserve Conspiracy, Antony C. Sutton has taken a complex subject and, with surgical precision, presented it in an easy-to-understand 115 pages.

“Since 1913 politicians and media have treated the Federal Reserve Bank as a kind of untouchable off limits semi-God… no one except certified crackpots and kooks criticizes the Fed. Conventional wisdom dictates that anyone who attacks the Federal Reserve System is doomed and Congressional investigation of the Fed would result in economic chaos and a disastrous plunge in the stock market,” Sutton writes.

Thus he begins to make his case that the Fed was created by bankers and their interests in order to create a money monopoly which enriched—and still enriches—an elite few and gives them complete control over the economic growth of the United States.

Sutton wrote this book in 1995—he died in 2002—yet it remains an excellent source for people interested in the conspiracy that resulted in the Federal Reserve.

Beginning with Alexander Hamilton’s efforts to establish a privately owned national bank in the European model, Sutton brings the reader through the history of the national bank movement in the U.S. He covers who was behind it and who opposed it, and why. Using their own words and writings, Sutton documents their motives and untangles the connections.

Everything I want to Do Is Illegal by Joel Salatin

Virginia farmer Joel Salatin, owner of Polyface Farms, began farming as a teenager with the goal of milking 10 cows by hand. That would earn him $1,000 per cow per year, not a bad living for teenager in the late 70s.

But there was one problem. It was illegal. Virginia, like many states, had banned the sale of raw milk.

Salatin writes, “Even if we were to move forward with cheese or some milk product, we would still need a license and inspected facility. A friend who ran a Grade A dairy wanted to make cheese. But by the time he installed all the required machinery and hardware, it would have cost them (sic) $100,000 to make one pound of cheese. End of dream. He continues to struggle, barely making ends meet. I’d love to buy his cheese, even if he made it in the kitchen sink. And that’s important to understand.”

In the book Salatin laments the demise of the local farmer’s market due to government health regulations and the bureaucratic minefield that is designed to stifle innovation and benefit the large agricultural-industrial complex at the expense of the small farmer.

Deep Politics and the Death of JFK by Peter Dale Scott

In Deep Politics and the Death of JFK, author Peter Dale Scott delves into the underworld and reveals the behind-the-scenes players whose actions actually drive the decisions of the surface politics we see.

Scott has done a lot of research on deep politics and its role in many aspects of America—9/11, drug wars and oil wars—and has written many books about it. In Deep Politics and the Death of JFK he focuses not on who actually pulled the trigger—he does not place the blame on Lee Harvey Oswald—but on all the enemies President John F. Kennedy made that would have a reason to see him dead.

Scott also goes deep into the links between organized crime, anti-Fidel Castro groups operating in the United States at the time, the military and its desire to continue the war in Vietnam, the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

The Real Lincoln by Thomas J. DiLorenzo

Although he is called the Great Emancipator, Abraham Lincoln embarked on a war that led to 620,000 deaths and the destruction of 40 percent of the American economy, not to free those held in slavery, but to centralize power in Washington, create “the American System” of Henry Clay and build an empire.

So says Thomas J. DiLorenzo, author of The Real Lincoln, which has the subtitle: A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda and an Unnecessary War.

DiLorenzo turns the myth that surrounds Lincoln on its head, and uses Lincoln’s own words and actions to do so. DiLorenzo writes that:

“According to one source, more than 16,000 books have been written on virtually every aspect of Lincoln’s private and public life. But much of what has been written about Lincoln is myth… Anyone who delves into this literature with an open mind and an interest in the truth cannot help but be struck by the fantastic lengths to which an entire industry of ‘Lincoln scholars’ has gone to perpetuate countless myths and questionable interpretations of events.”

DiLorenzo examines many of those myths in this book.

End the Fed by Ron Paul

During a Republican primary campaign rally at the University of Michigan in October, 2007, Rep. Ron Paul was greeted by supporters who began shouting “End the Fed, end the Fed,” as he began talking about monetary policy.

The cry resonated, and soon the whole crowd had taken up the cheer and some were holding burning dollar bills as if sending a message to the central bank. Almost a year later, at Paul’s counterconvention in Minneapolis, 12,000 people started the chant before Paul even mentioned the Federal Reserve. With that, the title for Paul’s latest book, End the Fed, was written.

Slaying Leviathan: The Moral Case for Tax Reform by Leslie Carbone

America’s income tax system is a visionless policy that has reduced a free people to moral slaves, squabbling over goodies. This is Leslie Carbone’s view as posited in her book, Slaying Leviathan: The Moral Case for Tax Reform.

The book is a history lesson of American tax policy. Beginning with the Stamp Act and other oppressive taxes the British foisted upon the colonies that spawned the Revolutionary War, Carbone describes the abusive tax systems that government has used to suppress, create disincentives and exploit its subjects.

The Constitution in Exile by Judge Andrew P. Napolitano

Almost since its adoption in July 1789, the U.S. Constitution—the oldest continuously effective written constitution in the world—has been under assault by presidents, Congress and errant decisions handed down by Supreme Court justices. That’s the view of Judge Andrew P. Napolitano in his book, The Constitution in Exile. Napolitano, the senior judicial analyst for Fox News Channel, New Jersey judge and legal professor and talk radio co-host, describes what the founders envisioned when they wrote the constitution. He explains Natural Law—that rights are endowed by a Creator, not by government—and what that idea meant to the Founders and should mean to us today. He describes Natural Law’s opposite—Positivisim—which is the idea that the law is whatever those in power say it is.

Culture of Corruption by Michelle Malkin

As a candidate, Barack Obama vowed to change the way Washington worked and to end politics as usual. As president, Obama has demonstrated that his “hopeychangey” mantra was all talk and his nominations, appointments and associations bear this out, according to Michelle Malkin in her latest book, Culture of Corruption.

Starting with the failed nominations of people like Tom Daschle, Bill Richardson and Nancy Killefer, Malkin takes the reader step-by-step through the sordid history of graft, tax evasion and insider deals of Obama’s cabinet nominees and official wannabees in the president’s inner circle.

For instance, the ultimate insider, former Senator Tom Daschle, was slated to be Obama’s Secretary of Health and Human Services, where he would lead the charge to reform the nation’s healthcare system. He and the president were so sure that Daschle’s confirmation was in the bag that Daschle already had office space decked out on the ground floor of the West Wing of the White House.

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