The Hypocrisy Of Justice As A System

Ah, the justice system — a murky, corrupt monstrosity that feeds itself with fines and fees, preying on the very people it is supposed to protect. Growing beyond the protection of the innocent to the pursuit of its own interest, the justice system, along with the Bar (together known as the legal system), generate an exorbitant amount of revenue each year. Do you really think they want to give that up for the sake of justice?

Certainly not, at least not willingly.

The Art Of Prosecuting The Innocent

Nothing is more loathsome than a prosecutor who knowingly pursues an innocent person for a crime he did not do, yet this practice happens on a daily basis. Even more despicable is when that same prosecutor does everything in his power to destroy a person for pleading innocent and trying to mount a defense, yet this, too, happens almost daily.

Should you ever be charged with a crime you did not do, prepare for a fight. Bud Sonnentag of Nye County, Nev., a Vietnam War hero, found out firsthand that if you don’t take a plea deal and you fight for your innocence, the prosecutors take it personally. Sonnentag said, “At every turn, there were the prosecutors stacking charges if I didn’t comply to their wishes.”

Is There Justice?

Justice is supposed to be blind. It’s supposed to be equal and fair. It’s supposed to be everything our system no longer is.

There are two phrases important enough to be inscribed on the exterior of the Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C.: “Equal Justice Under Law” and “Justice, the Guardian of Liberty.” Sadly, and due in large part to a shift in how prosecutors do their jobs and are allowed to operate above the very law they supposedly represent, these tenets — the founding principles of our justice system — have seemingly been replaced with “Justice Dispensed Without Equality” and “Injustice, Usurper of Liberty.” True justice suffers now from a system designed to get the highest conviction rating and the most fines and fees. Gone are the days of caring about guilt and innocence. Why bother when you can create an air of perceived guilt? As long as the public believes, guilt is really in the eye of the beholder, isn’t it? Not to those falsely accused, not to those who are innocent but sitting in a prison, not to those who fight for the innocence of their loved ones: It’s not right if we ever want to truly live in the “land of the free.”