Youth Demo Rejecting Obamacare As Too Expensive

0 Shares

A new poll by the American Action Forum reveals that, if President Barack Obama’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act — also known as Obamacare — ends up failing, the President will have simple market forces to thank.

That’s because young people, who typically incur lower healthcare costs as a demographic  far less exposed to health risks than the elderly, are showing signs they won’t opt into any form of mandatory health coverage if the premiums they have to pay climb very far — as many insurance forecasters predict they will.

If premiums rise 30 percent, for example, only 55 percent of young people polled said they would choose to purchase health insurance. That’s a lot fewer than the 83 percent who said they’d still buy insurance if the cost under Obamacare rises “only” 10 percent.

And if premiums do rise, the regressive subsidy that the young demographic’s artificially inflated Obamacare premiums were supposed to inject into the States’ new insurance “exchange” programs will disappear. That, in turn, would drive up premiums for the diminished number of people who do buy insurance — a phenomenon that would hit the elderly especially hard.

As for the younger people who choose not to deflate other people’s premiums at the expense of their own insurance costs? According to the poll, they’ll just drop out and pay the mandatory penalty.

Ben Bullard

Reconciling the concept of individual sovereignty with conscientious participation in the modern American political process is a continuing preoccupation for staff writer Ben Bullard. A former community newspaper writer, Bullard has closely observed the manner in which well-meaning small-town politicians and policy makers often accept, unthinkingly, their increasingly marginal role in shaping the quality of their own lives, as well as those of the people whom they serve. He argues that American public policy is plagued by inscrutable and corrupt motives on a national scale, a fundamental problem which individuals, families and communities must strive to solve. This, he argues, can be achieved only as Americans rediscover the principal role each citizen plays in enriching the welfare of our Republic.