When Gun Control Groups Unite

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Michael Bloomberg, New York City’s departing mayor, is merging his pet gun control group with Moms Demand Action, another gun control nonprofit formed in the wake of last December’s sensational Connecticut school shooting.

You may remember Moms Demand Action for its absurd, image-driven gun control ad campaign back in April. The ads featured young kids, placed in school settings, holding scary-looking black rifles and staring pensively into the camera.

You’re likely a bit more familiar with Bloomberg’s gun control group, Mayors Against Illegal Guns (MAIG). Most recently MAIG earned headlines for failing to mobilize enough support to help pro-gun control legislators in Colorado survive a voter recall after the State enacted knee-jerk firearms restrictions earlier this year. MAIG outspent the National Rifle Association on advertising in that effort by a significant margin, just as it has done in the year since the Sandy Hook, Conn. elementary school murders – with no success to show for the effort.

The merger is intended, according to MAIG chairman John Feinblatt, to combine MAIG’s funding with Moms Demand Action’s grassroots activism. Moms Demand Action will fill something Feinblatt calls “the intensity gap” as Bloomberg, who’s no longer tasked with running the Nation’s largest city, maps out a new gun control strategy, on a National scale, for 2014.

Ben Bullard

Reconciling the concept of individual sovereignty with conscientious participation in the modern American political process is a continuing preoccupation for staff writer Ben Bullard. A former community newspaper writer, Bullard has closely observed the manner in which well-meaning small-town politicians and policy makers often accept, unthinkingly, their increasingly marginal role in shaping the quality of their own lives, as well as those of the people whom they serve. He argues that American public policy is plagued by inscrutable and corrupt motives on a national scale, a fundamental problem which individuals, families and communities must strive to solve. This, he argues, can be achieved only as Americans rediscover the principal role each citizen plays in enriching the welfare of our Republic.