What Your Overworked Liver Is Dying To Tell You

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Low energy, chronic fatigue, problems sleeping, high blood pressure, unstable blood sugar, digestive problems, muscle and joint pain, headaches and weight gain are symptoms of an overworked and possibly toxic overload in your liver and kidneys.

These symptoms are your body’s way of talking to you and I encourage you to listen to what it has to say.

Prescription drug and alcohol use, pesticides and chemicals in your air and water and a high-fat, junk food diet all wreak havoc on your liver and kidneys and cause serious health problems. To make matters even worse, most doctors don’t even think of checking your liver and kidney health when they treat you.  So the damage continues until one day you’re facing a fate almost worse than death—non-functioning liver or kidneys.

Your liver is that “often-forgotten” four-pound organ located on the right side of your body that performs more than 500 bodily functions and chemical reactions every single day to keep you alive. In fact, your liver is so important, medical experts agree that if your body was a corporation, your liver would be the president.

Your liver is under constant abuse from over-the-counter and prescription medications, air and water pollution, alcohol use, chemical food additives, stress hormones and a host of other toxic weapons that are out to destroy it.

And the fact is that if your liver breaks down, then your body breaks down and you could die.

Your liver removes toxins and impurities from your body before they can cause you harm. But there’s a very good chance your liver is not performing at its maximum ability. And if you’re over age 40, you may already have the beginnings of a sluggish liver that can lead to an exhausted body.

In fact, by the time you reach age 40, the tubes and ducts leading to and from your liver can start to get clogged with undigested fats, environmental toxins, gallstones, scar tissue and metabolic wastes. And by age 50 you may only be producing a quarter of the bile your body needs to break down the fats from all the foods in your diet.

When your liver can’t make enough bile to remove the toxins, it encapsulates and stores the toxic materials, which will affect and harm your body for years to come. Some of these toxins become hard mineralized stones stored in your gall bladder—commonly known as gallstones.

As time goes by these stones accumulate and can block normal bile flow from your gallbladder to your liver. So if you have gallstones, you have a clear warning of a possibly serious liver problem.

But you can improve the condition of your liver with simple and natural ways that safely help remove dangerous toxins from your liver, unclog your liver cells and boost your liver function.

There are herbs, antioxidants, super-nutrients and amino acids that can help you detoxify and promote proper liver function. Some of these are milk thistle, soy lecithin and artichoke leaf. Other nutrients such as n-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), alpha lipoic acid (ALA) and trimethylglycine can also help contribute to a well-functioning liver and a healthy body.

For more information about liver and kidney detoxification, visit this website.

—Dr. Michael Cutler

Personal Liberty

Dr. Michael Cutler

is a graduate of Brigham Young University, Tulane Medical School and Natividad Medical Center Family Practice Residency in Salinas, Calif. Dr. Cutler is a board-certified family physician with more than 20 years of experience. He serves as a medical liaison to alternative and traditional practicing physicians. His practice focuses on an integrative solution to health problems. Dr. Cutler is a sought-after speaker and lecturer on experiencing optimum health through natural medicines and founder and editor of Easy Health Options™ newsletter — a leading health advisory service on natural healing therapies and nutrients.

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