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Top 100 Items to Disappear First During a National Emergency

June 10, 2013 by  

Top 100 Items to Disappear First During a National Emergency
PHOTOS.COM

In addition to food reserves, there are a host of other items that will be incredibly valuable if the supply chain breaks down due to a terrorist attack, a natural disaster or other national emergency. If you wait you could risk never being able to obtain many of these essentials or be forced to prices beyond what you’d ever dream possible.

You should avoid that risk and get started collecting them now. Not only are these items great to have on hand even if the crisis is short term, they could save your life in a variety of ways.

So as you move through this list, make a note of the items you still need. If there’s anything you don’t yet have in storage, add it to your shopping list and pick it up the next time you’re out.

Many of these items can be found at big stores like Wal-Mart, Target or K-mart, but there are a few you will need to get at a big box or local home supply store. Still others must be obtained other, less traditional places.

Here’s the list, and if you think of something not here, tell us about it in the comments section below:

1. Generators. (They go quickly when natural disasters are approaching or have already hit.)

2. Water filters and purifiers.

3. Portable toilets.

4. Seasoned firewood. Wood takes about six to 12 months to become dried for home uses.

5. Oil lamps, lamp oil, wicks.

6. Coleman fuel. (Impossible to have too much.)

7. Guns, ammunition, pepper spray, bows, arrows, knives, clubs, bats and slingshots.

8. Hand operated can openers, egg beaters and whisks.

9. Honey, syrups, white and brown sugar.

10. Rice, beans and wheat.

11. Vegetable oil (for cooking)..

12. Charcoal, lighter fluid (will become scarce suddenly).

13. Water containers, any size. Use food grade if storing water for drinking.

14. Tents and shelter-making materials.

15. Rope, paracord and binding straps. (Can’t have too much as these have hundreds of uses.)

16. Propane cylinders.

17. Survival guide book.

18. Mantles: Aladdin, Coleman, etc. (Without this item, longer-term lighting is difficult.)

19. Baby supplies: Diapers, formula, ointments, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, etc.

20. Washboards, mop bucket w/wringer (for laundry).

21. Cook stoves (propane, Coleman or kerosene).

22. Vitamin and mineral supplements.

23. Book on edible plants in your region.

24. Feminine hygiene, hair and skin care products, lip balm.

25. Thermal underwear (tops and bottoms).

26. Bow saws, axes and hatchets, wedges (also, honing oil).

27. Aluminum foil; regular and heavy duty (great cooking and barter item).

28. Gasoline containers (plastic and metal).

29. Garbage bags (impossible to have too many).

30. Toilet paper, facial tissue and paper towels.

31. Milk—powdered and condensed (shake liquid every three to four months).

32. Garden seeds (heirloom only)

33. Clothes pins, line and hangers.

34. Coleman’s pump repair kit.

35. Tuna fish (in oil).

36. Fire extinguishers (or a large box of baking soda in every room).

37. First aid kits.

38. Batteries (all sizes… buy furthest-out for expiration dates).

39. Garlic, spices, vinegar and baking supplies.

40. Big dogs (and plenty of dog food).

41. Flour, yeast and salt.

42. Matches. (“Strike anywhere” preferred.) Boxed, wooden matches will go first.

43. Writing paper, pads, pencils and solar calculators.

44. Insulated ice chests (good for keeping items from freezing in wintertime).

45. Work boots, belts, jeans and durable shirts.

46. Flashlights, light sticks and torches (No. 76 Dietz lanterns).

47. Journals, diaries and scrapbooks (jot down ideas, feelings, experience, historic times).

48. Garbage cans, plastic (great for storage, water, transporting—if with wheels).

49. Men’s hygiene: Shampoo, toothbrush and paste, mouthwash, floss, nail clippers, etc.

50. Cast iron cookware (sturdy, efficient, but heavy if on the move).

51. Fishing supplies and tools.

52. Mosquito coils, repellent, sprays and creams.

53. Duct tape.

54. Tarps, stakes, twine, nails, rope, spikes, etc.

55. Candles.

56. Laundry detergent (liquid).

57. Backpacks and duffel bags.

58. Garden tools and supplies.

59. Scissors, fabrics and sewing supplies.

60. Canned fruits, veggies, soups, stews, etc.

61. Bleach (plain, NOT scented: 4 to 6 percent sodium hypochlorite).

62. Canning supplies, (jars, lids, wax, etc.)

63. Knives and sharpening tools: Files, stones, steel, etc.

64. Bicycles… tires, tubes, pumps, chains, etc.

65. Sleeping bags, blankets, pillows, mats, etc.

66. Carbon monoxide alarm (battery powered).

67. Board games, cards, dice, etc.

68. d-con Rat poison, Mouse Prufe II, roach killer, etc.

69. Mousetraps, ant traps and cockroach magnets.

70. Paper plates, cups, utensils (stock up, folks).

71. Baby wipes, oils, waterless and antibacterial soap (saves water and can be used as a fire starter).

72. Rain gear, rubberized boots, etc.

73. Shaving supplies (razors, creams, talc, after shave, etc.)

74. Hand pumps and siphons (for water and for fuels).

75. Soy sauce, vinegar, bullions, gravy, soup base, etc.

76. Spare glasses and reading glasses.

77. Chocolate, cocoa, Tang, and punch (water enhancers).

78. Survival-in-a-can.

79. Woolen clothing, scarves, ear-muffs, mittens, etc.

80. Boy Scout handbook, also leader’s catalog.

81. Roll-on window insulation kit (MANCO).

82. Graham crackers, saltines, pretzels, trail mix, jerky, etc.

83. Popcorn, peanut butter, nuts, etc.

84. Socks, underwear, t-shirts, etc. (extras).

85. Lumber (all types).

86. Wagons and carts (for transport to and from).

87. Cots and inflatable mattresses.

88. Gloves: Work, warming, gardening, etc.

89. Lantern hangers.

90. Screen patches, glue, nails, screws, nuts and bolts.

91. Teas.

92. Coffee.

93. Cigarettes (barter item).

94. Wine and liquors (for barter, bribes, medicinal uses, etc.)

95. Paraffin wax.

96. Glue, nails, nuts, bolts, screws, etc.

97. Chewing gum and candies.

98. Atomizers (for cooling and bathing).

99. Hats and cotton neckerchiefs.

100. Livestock.

Bob Livingston

is an ultra-conservative American and author of The Bob Livingston Letter™, founded in 1969. Bob has devoted much of his life to research and the quest for truth on a variety of subjects. Bob specializes in health issues such as nutritional supplements and alternatives to drugs, as well as issues of privacy (both personal and financial), asset protection and the preservation of freedom.

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  • Pingback: Be Prepared! | TheFlippinTruth

  • Lillian Mills

    This is a great list but I am wondering since I am a widow and not getting any younger, how in the world am I going to keep up with all this and get it out of my apartment when purchased and this happens.? I have kept up with all the things that all you gentleman have written on the site. I also have told many people about all these things to come in and they look and laugh at me as though they think
    I am crazy. well maybe I am…..CRAZY LIKE A FOX
    I well recall the ration stamps on certain foods the prices and the blackouts .my mom and dad with eight children i was the fifth one down

  • Lillian Mills

    We lost this space.it took off with computer . Sorry about that.
    So
    ill just use it to tell everyone they
    Need to listen to you Bob. Altho things tbey say
    Already so bad for some they say they can Hardly make it through one day so I feel sorry for them I don’t know what to say or how to help them.
    On the other hand read my comment s below
    All that is true as well.

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