Tomorrow’s Recall Vote For Gun Control-Supporting Colorado Senators Draws Strong Early Turnout

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Tomorrow’s the day when two Colorado State Senators will find out whether their support of new, controversial gun laws adopted earlier this year will put a major damper on their own political careers. Early voting patterns suggest Tuesday’s turnout for a recall vote of Senator Angela Giron and Senate President John Morse will likely rival that of a Presidential election.

Morse and Giron, both Democrats, are facing voter-initiated recall elections aiming to remove them from office following their support of a trio of reactionary gun control laws that went into effect in July. Those laws, passed rapidly in the aftermath of last December’s sensationally violent school shooting in Connecticut, restrict the size of ammo magazines, strengthen a ban on so-called “assault” weapons and put the cost of mandatory background checks on would-be gun buyers.

Massive voter backlash, outrage from in-State gun manufacturers and organized opposition from county sheriffs culminated in the recall effort, which emanates from a broad cross section of residents who feel the State’s policies have begun to feel too great an influence from liberal sensibilities in and around Denver, its urban hub.

Early voting began late last week and will end tomorrow. The Denver Post published an article Saturday headlined “Sen. John Morse recall: Republicans dominate,” signaling a possible indication of the outcome.

Morse’s district, which lies entirely within El Paso County and centers on the City of Colorado Springs, is home to a mere 26 percent of Republican registered voters. But, of the 9,485 people who’d voted last week, 41.36 percent were registered Republicans.

“Democrats have a lot of votes to make up if they want to keep Morse in office,” observed the newspaper.

Ben Bullard

Reconciling the concept of individual sovereignty with conscientious participation in the modern American political process is a continuing preoccupation for staff writer Ben Bullard. A former community newspaper writer, Bullard has closely observed the manner in which well-meaning small-town politicians and policy makers often accept, unthinkingly, their increasingly marginal role in shaping the quality of their own lives, as well as those of the people whom they serve. He argues that American public policy is plagued by inscrutable and corrupt motives on a national scale, a fundamental problem which individuals, families and communities must strive to solve. This, he argues, can be achieved only as Americans rediscover the principal role each citizen plays in enriching the welfare of our Republic.