The Clintons Must Be Stopped

2 Shares

“My biggest, you know, regret is what happened in Benghazi. It was a terrible tragedy…”
— Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Jan. 27

“The lady doth protest too much, methinks.” — “Hamlet”

Just a year before she made an apology of sorts, then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was protesting with every fiber of her being about assuming any blame regarding the massacre in Benghazi, Libya.

Clinton was somewhere between screaming and pleading with Congress a year ago. “It wasn’t my fault” was central to her message, and there was ire in her words — especially those directed at Senator Ron Johnson (R-Wis.).

“With all due respect, the fact is we had four dead Americans,” Clinton scolded. “Was it because of a protest or was it because of guys out for a walk one night decided to go kill some Americans? What difference at this point does it make?”

It happens to make a very big difference why those Americans died, because their blood may be on your hands, Mrs. Clinton. And if you can’t admit that or accept any blame, it suggests you are incapable of a leadership position, that you are incapable of being the President of The United States of America.

One more question, Madam Secretary, how can you regret something that wasn’t your fault?

Slick Hillie?

The answer that is probably true is that Hillary knew damn well that those murders were her fault. Or, well, at least she is sorry now.

Thus begins the litmus test of whether Hillary Clinton has the Teflon skin that so deflected blame from her husband, President Bill Clinton, who was blameless when he seduced a 21-year-old intern, blameless when he lied about it under oath and blameless throughout a multitude of lies he told about his potentially criminal financial dealings.

To both Clintons, the ends justify the means, which is the greater good — their greater good. That means more lying through their teeth and both buying off or intimidating political or personal enemies.

In fact, the Clintons’ zeal to retake the Presidency has become a hot topic in Washington circles. In his 2012 book about the Obamas, The Amateur: Barack Obama in the White House, Edward Klein describes it in breathtaking manner from a firsthand source:

CHAPPAQUA, NEW YORK, AUGUST 2011

Bill and Hillary were going at it again, fighting tooth and nail over their favorite subject: themselves.

It was a warm summer Sunday–a full year away from the 2012 Democratic National Convention–and Bill Clinton was urging Hillary to think the unthinkable. He wanted her to challenge Barack Obama for their party’s presidential nomination. No American politician had attempted to usurp a sitting president of his own party since Ted Kennedy failed to unseat Jimmy Carter more than thirty years before.

“Why risk everything now?” Hillary demanded to know.

“Because,” Bill replied, “the country needs you!”

“The country needs us!” he shouted, banging a fist on his desk to drive home his point.

“The timing’s not right,” Hillary shot back.

“I want my term [at the State Department] to be an important one… Anyway, I’m young enough to wait my turn and run [for the White House] in the next cycle.”

“I know you’re young enough!” Bill said, raising his voice yet another notch. “That’s not what I’m worried about. I’m worried that I’m not young enough.”

So it is for Bill Clinton, a former President with a repaired heart who wants one more run at the Presidency — or at least the co-Presidency. And with the power and money the Clintons have, there may not be much to stop their ambitions. They have already made it their top task to raise a record war chest.

Yet Hillary Clinton remains as coy about her political ambitions as Bill Clinton was with his female friendships. Together they have locked in the money and built a political apparatus that makes them Presidential favorites in 2016. Given that the GOP is so broken at this point, it seems that another Clinton Presidency is a fait accompli.

But here are a few things to consider regarding another Clinton Presidency:

  1. The economic boom was thanks more to Bill Gates than Bill Clinton: Mrs. Clinton will largely be running off the past success of her husband’s economic record. It is a nice fairy tale. But Bill Clinton did not engineer the economic recovery of the 1990s that brought about a rise of good jobs and a soaring stock market. The primary engine that drove the economy and helped balanced Washington’s debt was the tech boom — not any political leadership by William Jefferson Clinton.
  2. The Clintons could have schooled Richard Nixon on how to build an enemies list: President Richard Nixon was notorious for making and remembering enemies, but the Clintons have turned it into a science. Last month, The Telegraph reported that the Clintons have a detailed “hit list” of all political friends and foes from the past 20 years or so. The so called “cheat-sheet” ranked offenders on a scale from 1 to 7 and gave the Clinton’s an instant hate-a-base. Imagine what such pettiness along with the power of the National Security Agency might wreak on the country if Hillary Clinton is elected President along with henchman husband Bill.
  3. The continued destruction of our liberties: The possibilities seem endless: Obamacare morphed into Hillarycare, greater taxation, bigger Federal government and greater co-operation between Hillary Clinton and those people she got to know best during her time as Secretary of State — the central figures constructing a New World Order.

As bad as eight years under President Barack Obama will turn out, another four — or perhaps eight — under the Clintons will be even worse.

Yours in good times and bad,

–John Myers

John Myers

is editor of Myers’ Energy and Gold Report. The son of C.V. Myers, the original publisher of Oilweek Magazine, John has worked with two of the world’s largest investment publishers, Phillips and Agora. He was the original editor for Outstanding Investments and has more than 20 years experience as an investment writer. John is a graduate of the University of Calgary. He has worked for Prudential Securities in Spokane, Wash., as a registered investment advisor. His office location in Calgary, Alberta, is just minutes away from the headquarters of some of the biggest players in today’s energy markets. This gives him personal access to everyone from oil CEOs to roughnecks, where he learns secrets from oil insiders he passes on to his subscribers. Plus, during his years in Spokane he cultivated a network of relationships with mining insiders in Idaho, Oregon and Washington.

Join the Discussion

Comment Policy: We encourage an open discussion with a wide range of viewpoints, even extreme ones, but we will not tolerate racism, profanity or slanderous comments toward the author(s) or comment participants. Make your case passionately, but civilly. Please don't stoop to name calling. We use filters for spam protection. If your comment does not appear, it is likely because it violates the above policy or contains links or language typical of spam. We reserve the right to remove comments at our discretion.