Thanksgiving Advice From Benjamin Franklin

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*Benjamin Franklin on Thanksgiving. My friend Mark Skousen finished a labor of love recently when he helped a distant relative complete his autobiography. When Benjamin Franklin died in 1790, he was only halfway through writing about his life. Mark and his wife finished the job for Mark’s many-times-great-grandfather.

The Completed Autobiography by Benjamin Franklin is drawn entirely from Franklin’s writings. My, but that Founding Father was a prolific author!

In the book, Franklin relates how “a farmer of great sense” told his fellow Pilgrims that instead of a day of fasting and prayer, “they should proclaim a thanksgiving.”
After all, as Franklin paraphrased him, “their seas and rivers were full of fish, the air sweet, the climate healthy, and above all, they were in the full enjoyment of liberty, civil and religious.”

Franklin then concludes, “His advice was taken, and from that day to this, they have in every year observ’d circumstances of public felicity sufficient to furnish employment for a Thanksgiving Day, which is therefore constantly ordered and religiously observed.”

I trust that you also have given thanks for the liberty and abundance we enjoy.

–Chip Wood  

Chip Wood

is the geopolitical editor of PersonalLiberty.com. He is the founder of Soundview Publications, in Atlanta, where he was also the host of an award-winning radio talk show for many years. He was the publisher of several bestselling books, including Crisis Investing by Doug Casey, None Dare Call It Conspiracy by Gary Allen and Larry Abraham and The War on Gold by Anthony Sutton. Chip is well known on the investment conference circuit where he has served as Master of Ceremonies for FreedomFest, The New Orleans Investment Conference, Sovereign Society, and The Atlanta Investment Conference.

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