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Survival Tips: Winter Storms And Power Outages

November 14, 2011 by  

Survival Tips: Winter Storms And Power Outages

A recent storm that tore through New England dumped more than a foot of snow in some areas and left hundreds of thousands without power for several days. This type of weather event is not rare during winter months and citizens should be prepared.

The Associated Press reported that some residents outside of Hartford, Connecticut, were still without power, eight days after the storm passed through the region.

In the event of a severe winter storm, individuals may want to have gathered the necessary tools and supplies. These include backup generators, a battery-powered or hand-cranked radio, flashlights, a supply of extra batteries, stores of nonperishable food and adequate amounts of water, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

The agency reported that when the power does go out individuals should turn on their generators outside, in order to prevent carbon monoxide exposure. Doors and windows should be kept closed as much as possible in order to prevent heat loss from a residence.

The Bergen Record reported that families may want to take drives in the car in order to get a warm meal, get out of the house or just to take a child’s mind off of the lack of power in the house.

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  • Reg Wannamaker

    When a power outage occurs in cold weather. here is two
    ideas to consider

    1. Get in advance a small wood stove and have wood or
    manufactured logs on hand to heat at least one room.

    2. Set up a small tent in living room and place blankets
    or clothing around inner wall with portable battery
    operated heat lamp.

    3. Have a barbecue just outside door for cooking and
    portable stove on the inside.

    Good luck, Reg or Pic, Canadian survivalist. Questions at:
    wanne33@shaw.ca

  • Robert Smith

    We had a fire in the fireplace for 8 days without electric. No heat, no hot water. We were connected to city water so we could flush.

    For sleep I had a deep cycle 12v battery with an inverter for my CPAP. I used a passive humidifier. We were in our own bedroom room under a big quilt. Except for no showers it wasn’t horrible. It’s the first disaster that I’ve been in that was catered.

    Not all power was out in all parts of the city. Deliveries of hot food were popular.

    Rob

  • USAF VET

    I keep thinking about those people who went out and bought one of those all electric cars, and then during the power outage were not able to charge up their expensive little deathtrap. That’s why I really like my F-150 pickup truck. If there’s a foot of snow on the ground, I’ll just roll right over it, and I don’t have to unplug it before starting it.

    • Robert Smith

      Vet says: “during the power outage were not able to charge up their expensive little deathtrap.”

      With a little planning a hybred could power a house for quite awhile. That’s technology I’d take a hard look at.

      BTW, the gasoline lines were up to three hours long because so many stations didn’t have power. The ones that did ran out of fuel and in one case their parking lot was full of folks who ran out of gas waiting.

      I know, I know, I’ll bet you had half a dozen jerry cans in your garage.

      Rob

      • USAF VET

        Not a half a dozen, but one Jerrycan hold quite a bit of fuel. The other thing is, how is that little “car” going to keep a house charged when it needs to be charged itsself?

  • socaldano

    Most gas furnaces central heat only require a little electricity to run. for an extended blackout one can rig it to a 120v plug, then use and extension cord to an inverter connected to a car to run it. Make sure you run the car regularly to keep the battery charged. Alternately you can use a 12v battery jumpstart.
    Ideally a generator running 15 minutes an hour would allow the furnace to heat the home and charge any UPS’s
    The laptop connected to a UVerse internet connection should last indefinitely because the UVerse landline has to have independent power on the grid…

    • Robert Smith

      Power, internet, and cable were ALL ripped from poles when trees hit them. The only reliable internet is from someone like Direct TV or Hughs that uses a satellite. Of course one needs power…

      For my Droid I had all the connection I needed and I charged it in the car. I got away for a week without my desk computer at home.

      Rob

  • socaldano

    Ohhh, the gas stove should work fine, if not, you can always connect it to your inverter or UPS, again this uses barely any electricity….unplug whatever you are not using when done.
    Then there is the propane camp stove….works better then a BBQ and you can use it in the garage….or mud room (make sure you have a CO2 detector)

  • Vic

    Not only Batteries, Candles, a Lantern, Propain tanks full with stoves I can use, gas in containers with stabilier in them, generator, food, water, gun with ammo, Very Cold weather cloths – if we loose power, I am ready. Most people aren’t at all. So be ready to fight for your life, it is lasts.

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