Survival Soups For Hard Times

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People are going hungry in America right now. More than 50 million people are on food stamps. If we do not stock up on food for our families, we will be standing in food-stamp lines and waiting for food banks to distribute food to us.

When hard times get even worse than they are now, I believe that we can survive on soup. Soups were one of the most typical mainstays of the early pioneers who settled my community. Because supplies were scarce, the pioneers were very frugal. Any soup bones, leftover scraps of meat and vegetables were used to make soup. When the farmers came in from the fields for lunch or dinner, their wives had soup on the stove. It was always served with homemade bread, butter and canned fruit or jam. It was hearty and the pioneers survived very well on it, thus “survival soup” was invented.

If we have dried survival foods on hand, we can make our own soups today using dehydrated foods such as powdered milk, powdered butter, dried tomato powder, freeze-dried meats, vegetables, bouillons, pastas and simple pantry items such as flour, salt and pepper.

The following simple soup recipes came from the cookbook Cookin’ With Home Storage. The soups are made with dried or dehydrated ingredients that can be stored for 15 years and used, if needed, in an emergency situation. I use dried vegetables for everyday cooking because the food doesn’t go to waste like fresh produce. You can use small amounts and store the rest.

Dried foods are the next best thing to fresh and are highly nutritious. They come in 1-gallon sized cans that take up one-third the space of wet-packed food. They have a long shelf life, and all you do to reconstitute them is just add water. I suggest you purchase a variety of all these items for soup making.

Basic Dried Soup Ingredients

  • Bouillon: beef and chicken
  • Tomato powder
  • Dried vegetables: such as broccoli, bell peppers, green beans, corn, carrots, celery, mushrooms, potatoes, cabbage, peas and onions.
  • Grains and legumes: barley, rice and beans
  • TVP (textured vegetable protein): chicken- flavored and beef-flavored.
  • Pasta
  • Spices: salt, pepper, parsley, garlic powder, onion powder, chili powder and others.
  • Dairy: butter powder, powdered milk, cheddar cheese powder.

Dried Onion Soup Mix

2/3 cup dried minced onion
½ cup beef bouillon granules
½ cup dried butter powder
2 tablespoons cornstarch
2 teaspoons onion powder
2 teaspoons parsley flakes

1). Mix all ingredients together and store in a jar with a tight-fitting lid.
2). Use this mix as a soup base or as a coating on meat. Use in any recipe calling for onion soup mix.

Creamy Potato Soup

4 cups water
1 cup dried cubed potatoes
1 tablespoon dried onions
½ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon chicken bouillon granules or 1 chicken bouillon cube
2 tablespoons salad oil or olive oil
2 tablespoons butter powder
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
¾ cup powdered milk

1). Put 3½ cups water into a pot with the potatoes, onions and salt until the potatoes are tender.
2). Mix together the oil, butter powder and flour, and stir into the hot potato and water mixture. Stir constantly while cooking on medium heat.
3). When the mixture thickens, add the milk and cook until desired consistency.
4). If the soup is too thick, add a little water to thin it down.

This soup can be a base for other soups, Add vegetables to make a great sauce over pasta. Add dried cheese to make a cheesy soup.

Sweet Corn Chowder

This recipe makes six 1-cup servings.

6 cups water
1 tablespoon dried onion*
¾ cup dried diced or cubed potatoes*
1 cup dried sweet corn*
⅔ cup powdered milk
2 tablespoons dried butter powder
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon chicken-flavored bouillon granules or 1 bouillon cube
¼ teaspoon each of salt and pepper to taste

1). Boil the 6 cups of water and dried vegetables for 10 minutes to rehydrate them.
2). Reduce the heat to medium. Add the powdered milk, butter powder, all-purpose flour, bouillon, salt and pepper. Continue simmering for 20 minutes until the vegetables are tender.

*Canned corn and fresh onions and potatoes can also be used to replace the dried vegetables.

Tomato Soup

½ cup powdered milk
¼ cup tomato powder or blend dried tomatoes into powder
4 cups water
2 teaspoons honey or sweetener
2½ tablespoons flour
2 tablespoons butter powder
¼ teaspoon granulated garlic or a dash of garlic salt
Salt and pepper to taste

1). Mix all ingredients together and bring to a boil.
2). Reduce the heat and simmer until the soup thickens.
3). This soup can be used as a sauce over pasta and vegetables or eaten plain with bread or crackers.

Old-Fashioned Vegetable And Pasta Soup

6-8 cups water
2 teaspoons beef bouillon or 2 beef bouillon cubes
¼ cup dried onions
¼ cup dried celery
¼ cup dried green beans or canned green beans
¼ cup dried broccoli
½ cup dried carrots
1 cup dried tomato powder
¼ cup dried sweet corn
½ cup dried diced potatoes
¼ cup elbow macaroni
½ cup freeze-dried beef or beef crumbles (optional)
Salt and pepper to taste

1). Using a medium stockpot, add 6 cups of water to the bouillon and dried vegetables.
2). Bring to a boil and cook for 10 minutes
3). Add the elbow macaroni and beef. Simmer for another 20-30 minutes until the vegetables and pasta are tender. Season to taste. More bouillon can be added for more flavor.
4). If the soup is too thick, add two cups of water to thin it.

Many of the dried ingredients in these recipes can be found here.

Emergency Soups: Just Add Water And Cook

The company that I purchase my food storage meals and soups from is called GoFoods. They sell a variety of premade soups that you just add water and cook for 20 minutes.

If you can boil water you can cook these delicious soups. This food is highly nutritious, with no genetically modified food (GMOs), no MSG and no trans fats. Packaged in a Mylar® bag, it’s compact and lightweight, too, making it easy to store. And it will retain its flavor and nutrition for a minimum of 15 to 25 years. The company will let you try the food before you buy it. You just pay the $9.95 shipping charge, and you will receive three free meals that serve four people each. That is a total of 12 servings for free.

For the entire month of June, you can get a special price of $500 plus shipping for a six-month supply for one person of delicious meals ready to just add water and cook. With four servings per package and 635 total servings, that works out to cost 79 cents per serving. This would last two people for three months and a family of four for six weeks. Plus, I will give you a free wholesale membership good for one year, so you can purchase food later at the wholesale prices.

To order either the free samples or the 6-month supply of meals, click here and go to “sign up” at the top next to log in. On page one of the sign up, there is a place for a promo code at the bottom. Use promo code SUCCESS500. This promotion won’t last, so take advantage of it today. Please call me, Peggy Layton, at 435-851-0777 if you have any questions or need assistance with this amazing offer.

–Peggy Layton

Personal Liberty

Peggy Layton

a home economist and licensed nutritionist, holds a B.S. in Home Economics Education with a minor in Food Science and Nutrition from Brigham Young University. Peggy lives in Manti, Utah with her husband Scott. Together they have raised seven children. Peggy owns and operates two businesses: One called "The Therapy Center", where she is a licensed massage therapist and hypnotherapist, and the other an online cookbook and preparedness products business. She is nationally known for publishing a series of seven books on the subject of food storage and also lectures and teaches seminars about preparedness and using food storage products. Peggy practices what she preaches, has no debt, grows a huge garden, lives off the land, raises chickens, bottles and dehydrates food and has time left over to operate her businesses. To check out Peggy's cookbooks and self sufficiency products go to her website www.peggylayton.com. To get a free sample of three different storable meals that have a 15-year shelf life go here.

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  • dan

    mmmm …..ham-hocks,beans and cornbread…what hard times ?

    • FreedomFighter

      Not Prepared: 17 Signs That Most Americans Will Be Wiped Out By The Coming Economic Collapse

      #14 48 percent of all Americans do not have any emergency supplies stored up.

      #15 53 percent of all Americans do not have a 3 day supply of nonperishable food and water in their homes.

      #16 One survey asked Americans how long they thought they would survive if the electrical grid went down for an extended period of time. Incredibly, 21 percent said that they would survive for less than a week, an additional 28 percent said that they would survive for less than two weeks, and nearly 75 percent said that they would be dead before the two month mark.

      #17 According to a survey conducted by the Adelphi University Center for Health Innovation, 55 percent of Americans believe that the government will come to their rescue when disaster strikes.

      Some really sad stats, guard your ham-hock bubba, there will be allot of people out for it.

      http://www.shtfplan.com/headline-news/not-prepared-17-signs-that-most-americans-will-be-wiped-out-by-the-coming-economic-collapse_06252013

      Laus DeoSemper FI

  • FreedomFighter

    “the cookbook Cookin’ With Home Storage. “

    I have had this book over a year and you will want this book, just a couple of the tips are worth the price, if you have never cooked with LTS foods, and are not a chef, its a must have for making it all taste great…eat good like you know you should. The book is also easy to read and recipes easy to follow.

    Laus DeoSemper FI

  • JimH

    Nothing like homemade soup and fresh biscuits.

  • independent thinker

    “TVP (textured vegetable protein): ”
    Sounds suspiciously like the “pink slime” they put in hamburger meat.

  • ridge runner

    We will see how long the trees and berry find out what is real, bet a few of these fat dogs and pampered cats will roast up over a hot camp fire, and taste like crap eating fowl. Time to watch idiots whine when the socialist/communist sttled food production really sucks, and FDR appointed the first Sec of Ag, a registered communist and beleived in government owning everything and everyone. We now have the lowest amount of cearal grain since we started having food stocks in storage. Or meat production is lower than in 1943. Chicken is controlled vertically by one producer by giving out contracts, same as pork in the last 20 years of vertical intergration, now China will be dumping their scavangered carcuss scraps of dead hogs. Think the dumb azzed beltway paper pusher give a rat bladder about what you eat. The 30 plus years of wildlife and feel happy s–t will starve out a lot of liberal clowns. Yippy Skippy, what a population control plan.

  • maddie

    Only problem I see is that all the beef/chicken/ham bouillon I have seen is full of MSG. Otherwise a very good article.

  • $9913635

    I don’t think these soups are GMO free. They contain Hydrolyzed Corn and other MSG in it. The website does not state it is GMO free.

    What is going on? Another lady survivalist tried to make MRE’s sound dangerous then pushed us to Mountain House that contained the same type of ingredients as MRE’s!!!

    Perusing the tortilla soup tells me it is the same as every other survivalist food out there. Only one guy is selling GMO free survival food but you have to make your own out of the raw ingredients because there is no GMO tvp free survivalist pre-made food out there.

    Not to mention HUGE sodium in them. All of them contain huge amounts of sodium.

    That is why it is called “survival” food because if you can eat all those chemicals and live….