Supreme Court To Address Arizona Immigration Law

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The Supreme Court will hear arguments over Arizona's controversial immigration law.

On Monday, the Supreme Court announced that it will hear a challenge to Arizona’s controversial immigration law (SB 1070), adding to a list of high-profile cases for the court’s coming term.

Arizona asked the court to allow the State to enforce legislation that was blocked after being challenged by the Administration of Barack Obama, including provisions that would enable police officers to question immigration status if they suspect a person is in the country illegally.

“I would like to commend the U.S. Supreme Court for its decision to review and hear arguments pertaining to the federal court injunction,” said Arizona Governor Jan Brewer in a statement. “I am confident the High Court will uphold Arizona’s constitutional authority and obligation to protect the safety and welfare of its citizens.”

The Justice Department contends that the State is encroaching upon its authority because Arizona’s immigration laws are “expressly designed to rival or supplant that of the Federal government,” according to The Hill.

Justice Elena Kagan, former solicitor in the Obama Administration, recused herself from the case.

According to The Associated Press, the court will hear oral arguments in late April.

Personal Liberty

Sam Rolley

Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After covering community news and politics, Rolley took a position at Personal Liberty Media Group where could better hone his focus on his true passions: national politics and liberty issues. In his daily columns and reports, Rolley works to help readers understand which lies are perpetuated by the mainstream media and to stay on top of issues ignored by more conventional media outlets.

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