Supreme Court Hearing Immigration Arguments

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The Supreme Court is hearing arguments today regarding the United States’ inefficient immigration system  as it considers Arizona’s controversial 2010 immigration reform law.

With nearly 11 million illegal aliens in the country and conflicting views about what to do with them, the arguments will focus on whether the Federal government is the only authority over immigration issues or if States like Arizona have roles to play as well.

“It’s Arizona’s right to protect its citizens,” said former Arizona State Senate President Russell Pearce (R), who was the author and main force behind Arizona’s law, in an interview with Fox News Latino. “States have inherent police powers. This law takes the political handcuffs off law enforcement in cracking down on undocumented immigrants.”

Some States, like Alabama, have moved forward with Arizona-type immigration reforms despite making changes to clear legal hurdles; others will likely wait until the Court makes a decision about the Constitutionality of such laws this summer. According to Pearce, there are 34 States waiting for the decision to move forward with similar legislation.

A Pew report released on Monday says that in recent years, illegal immigration to the United States from Mexico has decreased sharply for the first time in two decades.

The report says:

The largest wave of immigration in history from a single country to the United States has come to a standstill. After four decades that brought 12 million current immigrants—more than half of whom came illegally—the net migration flow from Mexico to the United States has stopped—and may have reversed, according to a new analysis by the Pew Hispanic Center of multiple government data sets from both countries.

The standstill appears to be the result of many factors, including the weakened U.S. job and housing construction markets, heightened border enforcement, a rise in deportations, the growing dangers associated with illegal border crossings, the long-term decline in Mexico’s birth rates and changing economic conditions in Mexico.

More information about the Supreme Court and the Arizona Immigration law can be found here.

Personal Liberty

Sam Rolley

Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After covering community news and politics, Rolley took a position at Personal Liberty Media Group where could better hone his focus on his true passions: national politics and liberty issues. In his daily columns and reports, Rolley works to help readers understand which lies are perpetuated by the mainstream media and to stay on top of issues ignored by more conventional media outlets.

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