Statistics: U.S. population becoming more racially, ethnically diverse

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Report shows country is becoming more diverseIn a prelude to the 2010 census, the U.S. Census Bureau has released national population estimates that show America is becoming more diverse.

Among the key findings of this preliminary report is that fact that the overall minority population has grown to 104.6 million as of July 1, 2008, and now represents 34 percent of the total population.

Moreover, some 47 percent of the nation’s children under the age of five were a minority in 2008, including 25 percent Hispanics.

The estimates also suggest the largest and fastest-growing minority group are Hispanics, numbering 46.9 million in 2008, up by 3.2 percent from 2007. They are followed by Asians at 15.5 million, an increase of 2.7 percent.

According to CNN.com, Ken Gronbach, author of The Age Curve: How to Profit from the Growing Demographic Trend, believes this is a welcome trend from the economic point of view.

"Latinos have saved our country," he said, quoted by the news source.
"They represent 14 percent of the population but 25 percent of the live births," he added. "The U.S is the only western industrialized nation with a fertility rate above the 2.2 percent replacement rate."

Others point to the immigration implications of these trends as minority groups tend to have relatives living abroad, and the majority of new immigrants come from Central and South America.

This situation, they say, will make it even more imperative to conduct a comprehensive immigration reform.ADNFCR-1961-ID-19173175-ADNFCR

Personal Liberty News Desk