Slate Writer Takes Lefty Critics Of Rubio Creationist Remarks To Task

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In a recent column, the left-leaning Slate pointed out the hypocrisy of liberal attacks against Tea Party favorite Marco Rubio for his assertion in a magazine interview that he really wasn’t sure how old the planet was.

The article reads:

By now you’ve heard the outrageous quote from Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., on his doubts about the origins of planet Earth. When asked to give its age, he replied: “I’m not a scientist, man. … Whether the Earth was created in 7 days, or 7 actual eras, I’m not sure we’ll ever be able to answer that. It’s one of the great mysteries.”

He’s not a scientist—no, indeed—and his comments have brought on a slew of finger wags and face-palms from the godless left. The answer was “so confused and error-riddled,” wrote Phil Plait in Slate, “it’s difficult to know where to start.” We all should understand the age of Earth is not a matter of opinion, but a scientific fact: Our planet formed 4.54 billion years ago. If Rubio suggested otherwise, it’s because he’s uninformed or stupid.

But unlike many of Rubio’s other attackers from the left, the author of the article, Slate’s Daniel Engber, points out another scientifically and religiously willfully ignorant commenter on the subject of Earth’s origins.

Here’s how President Barack Obama answered a question about whether he believed God created the world in six days at a 2008 speaking engagement:

I believe that God created the universe and that the six days in the Bible may not be six days as we understand it … it may not be 24-hour days, and that’s what I believe. I know there’s always a debate between those who read the Bible literally and those who don’t, and I think it’s a legitimate debate within the Christian community of which I’m a part. My belief is that the story that the Bible tells about God creating this magnificent Earth on which we live—that is essentially true, that is fundamentally true. Now, whether it happened exactly as we might understand it reading the text of the Bible: That, I don’t presume to know.

And here’s Rubio’s answer from the December 2012 edition of GQ regarding how old he believes the Earth to be:

I’m not a scientist, man. I can tell you what recorded history says, I can tell you what the Bible says, but I think that’s a dispute amongst theologians and I think it has nothing to do with the gross domestic product or economic growth of the United States. I think the age of the universe has zero to do with how our economy is going to grow. I’m not a scientist. I don’t think I’m qualified to answer a question like that. At the end of the day, I think there are multiple theories out there on how the universe was created and I think this is a country where people should have the opportunity to teach them all. I think parents should be able to teach their kids what their faith says, what science says. Whether the Earth was created in 7 days, or 7 actual eras, I’m not sure we’ll ever be able to answer that. It’s one of the great mysteries.

With looming financial calamity, global war only a button away at any given time and a near constant assault by the Federal government against American civil liberties, should the populace really care at all about how either of these guys believe we got here in the first place?

Hat Tip: Slate

Sam Rolley

Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After covering community news and politics, Rolley took a position at Personal Liberty Media Group where could better hone his focus on his true passions: national politics and liberty issues. In his daily columns and reports, Rolley works to help readers understand which lies are perpetuated by the mainstream media and to stay on top of issues ignored by more conventional media outlets.