Show, Don’t Tell: Obama Uses Words, Not Action, To Say He’s Sorry For Obamacare

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If President Barack Obama were “sorry” for lying to everybody about his healthcare law’s destructive effect on existing insurance policies – the policies he pledged everyone could keep if they liked – he wouldn’t be getting on TV with Chuck Todd to say “I am sorry that they, you know, are finding themselves in this situation, based on assurances they got from me.”

He wouldn’t chase a heartfelt mea culpa with an increasingly feeble self-acquittal of how great his plan really will be, one day, when people finally realize he knew what was best for them at a dark time, when everyone lacked faith that there was room for equivocation and nuance in his oft-repeated words: “If you like your health care plan, you’ll be able to keep your health care plan, period. No one will take it away from you, no matter what.”

He’d be going to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), urging the Democratic leadership in Congress to modify or repeal the law. He’d call Attorney General Eric Holder off a defense of Obamacare in a legal challenge from Oklahoma’s attorney general. He’d reach out to Congressional Republicans attempting to ameliorate the effect of millions of Americans’ policy cancelations by urging bipartisan support for the Keep Your Health Plan Act, which aims to keep current policies active – if only for another year.

Action, not words.

Here’s a great piece from Time magazine’s “Swampland” blog on Obama’s talking-point reversals as the President has cast about for a defensible Obamacare narrative in the wake of his favorite law’s disastrous launch.

At this point, it almost seems as though Obama isn’t interested in salvaging anything about Obamacare itself. Rather, he seems to be trying to salvage his credibility and the damage he’s done to Democrats, who are staring down a mob of angry constituents as 2014 approaches.

Ben Bullard

Reconciling the concept of individual sovereignty with conscientious participation in the modern American political process is a continuing preoccupation for staff writer Ben Bullard. A former community newspaper writer, Bullard has closely observed the manner in which well-meaning small-town politicians and policy makers often accept, unthinkingly, their increasingly marginal role in shaping the quality of their own lives, as well as those of the people whom they serve. He argues that American public policy is plagued by inscrutable and corrupt motives on a national scale, a fundamental problem which individuals, families and communities must strive to solve. This, he argues, can be achieved only as Americans rediscover the principal role each citizen plays in enriching the welfare of our Republic.

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