Senate Upholds Internet Regulation Rules

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On Thursday, the Senate upheld rules that regulate some aspects of the Internet.

On Thursday, the Senate rejected a bill that would repeal the Federal Communication Commission’s net neutrality rules.

According to The Hill, the measure passed the House in April, but failed in the Senate on a vote of 52-46. It needed 51 votes to pass and was not subject to a filibuster.

The FCC’s net-neutrality regulations are aimed at preventing Internet service providers from slowing down or speeding up access to websites, and they ban wireless carriers from blocking lawful websites or applications that compete with their services.

Supporters of the rules believe they preserve competition on the Internet, while those against them say they represent government attempts to regulate the Internet. President Barack Obama said he would have vetoed legislation that struck down the neutrality laws.

Though there are several lawsuits challenging the FCC’s ability to intervene in Internet communication (including one lawsuit filed by Verizon), the rules are scheduled to take effect on Nov. 20.

 

Sam Rolley

Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After covering community news and politics, Rolley took a position at Personal Liberty Media Group where could better hone his focus on his true passions: national politics and liberty issues. In his daily columns and reports, Rolley works to help readers understand which lies are perpetuated by the mainstream media and to stay on top of issues ignored by more conventional media outlets.