Senate Upholds Internet Regulation Rules

0 Shares

On Thursday, the Senate rejected a bill that would repeal the Federal Communication Commission’s net neutrality rules.

According to The Hill, the measure passed the House in April, but failed in the Senate on a vote of 52-46. It needed 51 votes to pass and was not subject to a filibuster.

The FCC’s net-neutrality regulations are aimed at preventing Internet service providers from slowing down or speeding up access to websites, and they ban wireless carriers from blocking lawful websites or applications that compete with their services.

Supporters of the rules believe they preserve competition on the Internet, while those against them say they represent government attempts to regulate the Internet. President Barack Obama said he would have vetoed legislation that struck down the neutrality laws.

Though there are several lawsuits challenging the FCC’s ability to intervene in Internet communication (including one lawsuit filed by Verizon), the rules are scheduled to take effect on Nov. 20.

 

Sam Rolley

Staff writer Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After learning about many of the biases present in most modern newsrooms, Rolley became determined to find a position in journalism that would allow him to combat the unsavory image that the news industry has gained. He is dedicated to seeking the truth and exposing the lies disseminated by the mainstream media at the behest of their corporate masters, special interest groups and information gatekeepers.