School Lunch Regulations Create Black Market, Hunger, Wasted Food

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Some entrepreneurial students in Massachusetts are using the restrictions on school lunches as a way to make a little extra money. A black market for chocolate syrup is forming. The sugary substance sells for 50 cents a squeeze.

On Aug. 1, chocolate milk became a thing of the past for students at Greater New Bedford Vocational-Technical High School. But that hasn’t stopped students from making their own.

“Of course they got rid of dessert, (but) flavored milk … I don’t understand why we can’t have that,” student Paige Lame told the Standard Times.

The rules also reduce the amount of protein students can have while increasing their servings of fruits and vegetables.

Students are largely not in favor of the new rules. Massachusetts introduced new lunchroom guidelines this year, as have many schools across the Nation.

“You’re paying more for less,” said student Erik Cortez of New Bedford. “I get it, but why should they have the right to tell you what you can and can’t eat?”

If students don’t eat the lunch, then the program is of no benefit, a fact that the Federal government seems to have overlooked. More students are bringing their lunch or just throwing away what they are given in the cafeteria.

“Last year, my son didn’t bring lunch. This year, he’s bringing lunch because he’s hungry,” said a parent of a New Bedford student.

In Wisconsin, students have taken to YouTube to protest.

 

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2IB7NDUSBOo&w=420&h=315]

 

Bryan Nash

Staff writer Bryan Nash has devoted much of his life to searching for the truth behind the lies that the masses never question. He is currently pursuing a Master's of Divinity and is the author of The Messiah's Misfits, Things Unseen and The Backpack Guide to Surviving the University. He has also been a regular contributor to the magazine Biblical Insights.

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