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School Is Too Easy In The U.S.

July 12, 2012 by  

School Is Too Easy In The U.S.
PHOTOS.COM
Students aren’t spending time with their books because school is too easy.

America was once a Nation that prided itself on its educational standards. It was a country that stayed ahead of the pack through its ongoing quest for knowledge. It was a place to which people from all over the world would come in order to sit at the feet of elite teachers. But those days are a thing of the past, according to a new report.

The report, issued by the Center for American Progress, found that many students think school is too easy. Nearly 30 percent of eighth-graders surveyed said their math curriculum is “often or always too easy.” Almost 40 percent of fourth-graders said the same. Close to 60 percent of eighth-graders said their history work is “often or always too easy.” And about 30 percent of eighth-graders reported reading less than five pages a day.

The findings were consistent at higher grades. About 40 percent of high school seniors said that they “hardly ever or only once or twice a month” write about the things they read during class.

The survey revealed that America is not keeping up with the rest of the world in regard to engineering and technology; 72 percent of eighth-graders are taught nothing about the subjects.

Some of the fault can be placed on the teachers. One out of every four middle school math students does not understand his teacher’s questions. And 36 percent of high school seniors “sometimes or hardly ever clearly understand” the questions posed by math teachers.

It is clear that the United States is no longer a place of educational excellence, especially when compared to other parts of the world. Students in other countries have been known to commit suicide when they don’t get the grade they want. School officials in the U.S. should come to grips with the fact that the image of students lugging around books and pouring over homework in the wee hours is a thing of the past.

Bryan Nash

Staff writer Bryan Nash has devoted much of his life to searching for the truth behind the lies that the masses never question. He is currently pursuing a Master's of Divinity and is the author of The Messiah's Misfits, Things Unseen and The Backpack Guide to Surviving the University. He has also been a regular contributor to the magazine Biblical Insights.

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  • CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

    FOR ONE THING, TOO MANY TEACHERS GIVE “MULTIPLE-CHOICE” EXAMS. THERE SHOULD BE A LAW WHICH STATES ALL HIGH-SCHOOLS [9-12] MUST ADMINISTER ONLY “ESSAY” EXAMS. TODAY’S HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS DO NOT KNOW HOW TO WRITE A GRAMMATICALLY-CORRECT SENTENCE, NOR, PARAGRAPH. HAVING TO COMPLETE AN ESSAY EXAM DURING A FIFTY-MINUTE-CLASS-TIME PERIOD, ALSO PROVIDES EXPERIENCE WITH “THINKING ON YOUR FEET” AND THE ABILITY TO MENTALLY-RETAIN DATA OVER A PERIOD OF TIME.

    CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

    • Michael J.

      Education has morphed into an ideological indoctrination assembly line churning out little communist, period. That’s the reason for the push for education above all else. Smart, inovative entrepenuers will not be required in the coming regime, just loyal reciters of the party propaganda, equipped with blinders. (blinders are not just for horses anymore)

    • Robert Smith

      And then there are those on the web who insist upon yelling everything.

      Sheesh…

      The problem is “teaching to the test” that the no child left behind and similar efforts of those who are too small minded to let teachers teach.

      Just because a teacher doesn’t teach the way any particular individual expects doesn’t make them a bad teacher, particularly when the kid is learning. I doubt “wax on, wax off” would every be allowed in any school, but it worked for that particular circumstance for that kid.

      We also need to quit arguing about things like evolution and creationism. Creationism is a religion, not science.

      And kids really do need age appropriate sex education. Too many parents just don’t do the job.

      Rob

      • Grammy

        If a teacher is “teaching to the test,” he or she isn’t a very good teacher. The test delineates the minimum knowledge required at each level. Nobody says a teacher can’t teach anything else. I am glad there is a minimum standard for all students.

      • cawmun cents

        This from someone who believes like they are taught by established science that”it happens”is the way the entire universe was formed.
        No explaination of how it happens is necessary for you,so you just believe what the quasi-educated tell you.
        And you think I am backwards.
        Cheers!
        -CC.

      • Vigilant

        CC, you’re on to something there. Science can only ever try to explain HOW things work. It’s a shame the imagination-challenged folks never progress to questioning WHY things are.

        The question leads to something that has given solace and hope to billions of people in the history of the world. It was the question answered in the Declaration of Independence, the very foundation of the Constitution, by Thomas Jefferson. And it is the answer so many atheist dullards reject. Their loss, our gain.

        I’ve often thought that it was because these atheists never recovered when they discovered that Santa Claus is a fable. What they will never learn is that Santa is a very REAL entity, in the metaphorical and metaphysical sense.

      • Nancy in Nebraska

        The problem began when liberal educators starting watering down the curricula with crap like environmentalism, green power, evolution, sex education, health, music, art etc… The conservatives said, ok but you’ve got to make sure the kids learn the basics, hence no child left behind. No child left behind is a disaster! You cannot expect anyone to do the impossible! Not every child can learn, no matter how hard you try to teach them. The first few years of school should include only the basics, reading, writing and math. These things are necessary to a strong educational foundation. Then you can expand into history and science. Leave out the social crap and theories! Knowledge is much more valuable than opinion! There isn’t enough money or hours in a day to teach everything. So stick with true academics and let parents be responsible for social issues. I know, you’ll say that parents won’t do it. So??? Would you rather everyone have a strong academic education with many lacking in social issues? Or would you rather we have uneducated masses like we have now? Certainly, what they’re doing now DOESN’T WORK,!

      • Kinetic1

        Grammy,
        In my experience it is not the teacher who is responsible for teaching to the test, but the administration. The curriculum dictated by the administrators, the materials provided and progress tests required dictate what a teacher must do to remain employed.

      • http://gravatar.com/bychoosing Jay

        Vigilant: What they will never learn is that Santa is a very REAL entity, in the metaphorical and metaphysical sense.

        Santa-unscrambled=Satan

    • Grammy

      Your “essay” contains many mistakes. Perhaps you should teach yourself grammar, sentence structure, and punctuation. School is not the only place to learn. There are plenty of books available in the library to hone your writing skills. …and, please don’t “shout” by typing in capital letters.
      Schools should be teaching the basics instead of doing all the social engineering they do. Most importantly, they should be teaching HOW to learn. Learning is a lifetime activity.

      • Grammy

        (My comments saying his essay wasn’t correct were directed to Robert Horton. That is not clear in the way the comments are lined up.)

      • Nadzieja Batki

        Perhaps C A Horton has vision problems, so let us give it a pass for now until he let’s us know otherwise. If he doesn’t let us know we can take this as a cue to ignore his posts.

      • Kinetic1

        Grammy,
        Where exactly do you get your information on school curriculum? I have read my children’s history and science books and have found little to suggest the socialist indoctrination suggested by many on this site.

      • http://gravatar.com/bychoosing Jay
      • Kinetic1

        Jay,
        Thanks for the link. So far, this book has supported everything I have ever said about the failure of “No Child Left Behind” and teaching to the test. In fact, my main argument to many of the responses on this sight, that the teachers are not the culprits but rather the victims of the school administrators is supported in this work.

        As for the writer’s arguments about private vs public education, there may have been, and there may still be some private schools with very limited tuition, but the average cost of a private school in this country today is about $8,549 per year. (http://www.capenet.org/facts.html) This average is lowered substantially by the inclusion of religious institutions whose rates are less than half of non-sectarian schools (Catholic – $6,018 vs NS – $17,316.) Compare this to the average cost in the public system, about $10,000 per year. If all parent’s were given vouchers to send their kids to private schools, where do you think most would end up? I don’t happen to agree with the tenets of the Catholic church, or those of the Jewish or Baptist faiths, but I can’t afford an extra $14,600 a year for my two kids to attend a non-sectarian school, so I guess I would just have to pick the least offensive and do my best to help my children resist their religious indoctrination. That is what the writer seems to promote, indoctrination of our children based on “traditional values”. i.e. old school Christian, and what better way than to encourage enrollment in religious K-12 schooling?

        I do believe that the cost of education in America is over inflated, but not by teacher salaries. No, I put the blame squarely on the shoulders of the administrators and the testing industry. My county, in which there are 250,000 people covers only 520 square miles. 25% of the population is under 18 and is served by aprox. 70 schools and 20 school districts. Some of these districts have just 1 or 2 schools, while others have as many as 18! How much money could we save by reducing the number of district offices to say 5? Superintendents earn several times what the best teachers earn, as much as $160,000 a year! And how about the cost of staff? No, I’m not happy with the cost or the results of public education in America, but I’m not ready to accept the privatization of it either.

    • http://msbets.wordpress.com msbets

      You know who to blame for is don’t you……….radical lib commie/marxist teachers……….they do NOT teach them to think for themselves………..just teach that collective shyt, the government will take care of you from cradle to grave………only this puke we have now only wants you healthy from 15 to 50, before or after that, you better not get anything that’s NOT cost effective or you will be left to “comfort care” and allowed to die, you can save yourself if ……..YOU PERSONALLY HAVE HAVE THE MONEY. and by the way in the so called iatolaovomitcare……….people who the 15 mongrels decide to deny care is called……….UNITS, not people but UNITS!!!!!!!!!!!!

      • Michael J.

        msbets,
        You’ve got the cradle to the grave part right. The only difference is that in their ideological wet dream of the future it’s gonna be tough to make it to the cradle, and you may get a trip to the grave via budget restraints.

      • Kinetic1

        msbets,
        Given this display of ignorance you have chosen to grace us with, I would suggest you concern yourself with your own failure in school and not those of an imagined corp of radical leftist teachers.

    • Franklyn Molina

      I don’t mean to be rude, but while you make good points, the fact that you seem to follow the “rules of the internet,” completely detract from your argument and make you look bad.

      39. CAPS LOCK IS CRUISE CONTROL FOR COOL

      Got news for you Chris Allen Horton

      40. EVEN WITH CRUISE CONTROL YOU STILL HAVE TO STEER

      Get the glue out of your caps lock, go back and try again, kid.

  • Harold Olsen

    Of course school is too easy in the US. Teachers don’t teach (in fact, many are in capable of teaching) and instead of grading on the work their students do, many teachers just grade on whether students who up or not. If they show up. they get an “A.” Simple. I’ve lost track of how many people I’ve met in the last decade or so who are high school graduates and have even gone to college but can barely read or write, even their own names. People who were home schooled or attended private schools, especially religious privates schools, are far better educated than people who attended public schools. Our tax dollars going for education is being totally wasted!

    • CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

      “Harold Olsen,”

      STUDENT DISCIPLINE IN THE CLASSROOM IS SO BAD THAT WELL-BEHAVED STUDENTS OF “C+” OR “B-” CALIBER ARE AWARDED “As.” IN MEMPHIS, I HAVE SOME TEACHER-FRIENDS WHO TELL ME THEY RUN TO THEIR CARS AFTER SCHOOL BECAUSE THEY ARE AFRAID OF WHAT COULD HAPPEN TO THEM IN THE PARKING LOT. SOME OF MY TEACHER-FRIENDS TOOK AN EARLY RETIREMENT BECAUSE OF STUDENTS’ POOR DISCIPLINE. SINCE MANY NEGRO MALES ARE ALREADY SIX-FEET TALL (AND, UP) IN MIDDLE SCHOOL [SIXTH-THROUGH EIGHTH-GRADE], MANY TEACHERS ARE “SCARED TO DEATH.” WHEN I WAS A CHILD, CHILDREN DID NOT CURSE ADULTS; NOW, STUDENTS CALL TEACHERS “MF-BOMBS” IN THE CLASSROOMS. THREE-DAY-HOME SUSPENSIONS ARE NO DETERRENT; MANY SUSPENDED STUDENTS ENJOY THE TIME-OFF.

      CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

      • Kinetic1

        CAH,
        Your loudly presented opinion (please learn to use lower case letters, where appropriate) seems to speak more to the failure of parents than that of the teachers. One can hardly expect a high school teacher to instill discipline and respect in students who were not taught such at home. This also speaks to the advantages you note in home and private schooling. Parents who are willing to invest the time or money to ensure the best education possible for their children are more likely to teach them respect as well. If not, you can be certain that a private school will not tolerate students who display poor behavior, unlike public schools where the law requires that all children be given extraordinary leeway and special attention.

        No body is perfect, and that includes teachers. My children have benefitted from several wonderful teachers and suffered some who were not, but they knew they were to respect each of them, as well as the rights of their classmates. Having volunteered in several of their classes, I can say without hesitation that this was not true for all of their peers. We are quick to point out the pain our troops feel when they are lead to believe that we do not support them. Isn’t it about time we stop beating up our teachers as well? Is it fair to accuse them all of being over paid under achievers who waste our tax dollars and fail our children?

      • Kinetic1

        CAH,
        Please note, the average hight of American children has steadily increased over the last 50 years. As such, the idea of high school students who are taller than their teachers is nothing new. Further, the occurrence of high school students reaching heights over 6 feet tall is hardly limited to the black community. Even if it were, neither height nor race is reason to be fearful. I would suggest that it is parenting and environment, not race that leads a child to be disrespectful or aggressive, and I am disappointed by your suggestion that it is otherwise.

      • CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

        “Kinetic1,”

        YOU ARE OUT OF TOUCH WITH NEGRO BIOLOGY. WHEN NEGRO MALES START PUBERTY – BETWEEN SEVEN AND NINE – BODY SIZE GROWS QUICKLY. SECOND- AND THIRD-GRADE NEGRO MALES WEAR 7-1/2 AND 8 (OR, UP) SIZE SHOES. SIXTH-GRADE NEGRO MALES CAN WEAR THEIR FATHER’S CLOTHING. WHY DO YOU THINK HIGH-SCHOOL ATHLETIC RECRUITERS COME TO INNER-CITY MIDDLE SCHOOLS [NEGROES] FOR ATHLETES; AND, NOT SUBURBAN MIDDLE SCHOOLS [CAUCASIANS]?

        I USED TO BE A SUBSTITUTE TEACHER (K-12). I KNOW WHAT I AM TALKING ABOUT. PUBLIC SCHOOLS ARE FILLED WITH NEGROES – ADMINISTRATION, STAFF, TEACHERS AND STUDENTS. I KNOW NOTHING OF PRIVATE SCHOOLS.

        CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

      • Vigilant

        Christopher and Kinetic, you are both correct to a degree.The problems in the classroom are a reflection across the board of a failure at all levels.

        When I was a child in the 50s, all 3 institutions were on the same page, i.e., family, church and school. Each bolstered and complemented the other in teaching respect, discipline and morals. Getting higher grades was encouraged, and teachers were generally more qualified in their field.

        If you include “traditionalism” in the definition of Conservative values, and you admit that liberal attitudes over the decades tend to wear down traditional values, then you must conclude that the relaxation of standards, expectations and behaviors has rent asunder the fabric of society in this nation.

        To be fair, liberal programs, when applied with prudence, have advanced the cause of society when reforms were needed. To be equally fair, no reasonable Conservative wishes to see a return to slavery or to sweatshop work conditions.

        It’s a balancing act. Liberals need to acknowledge that the erosion of societal values is a product of misguided or excessive relaxation of standards. Conservatives need at the same time to recognize that it was liberal influences that improved society by civil rights legislation, universal suffrage and workplace safety improvements.

      • Vigilant

        Christopher, when I said you were right to a degree, I was not addressing your racial observations. Your protests are a bit too edgy to be identified as purely education related.

      • CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

        “Kinetic1,”

        THIS INFO MAY HELP YOU TO UNDERSTAND NEGRO CULTURE. NEGRO PARENTS OF SIXTH-GRADERS (AND, LOWER) STILL “ENJOY THE STREETS.” NEGRO MOTHERS OF ELEMENTARY CHILDREN WEAR MINI SKIRTS AND STILETTOS; NEGRO FATHERS OF ELEMENTARY CHILDREN WEAR “MAC-DADDY” Armani SUITS. WHEN INNER-CITY SIXTH-GRADERS HAVE “DRESS-UP DAY” AT SCHOOL, THE NEGRO STUDENTS WEAR THEIR PARENTS CLOTHING.

        “Kinetic1,” NEGROES UTILIZE CLOTHING (AND, CARS) AS A SIGN OF HAVING MONEY. NEGRO CHILDREN DO NOT WANT TO LOOK “POOR” AT SCHOOL. ["Kinetic1," have you ever driven into a poor Negro neighborhood and saw a "raggedy" house with a Jaguar or Mercedes parked in the driveway]?

        CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

      • Vigilant

        Mr. Horton, your stereotypes are repulsive and decidedly untypical. Get off the racial aspect and address the subject of the article please.

      • CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

        “Vigilant,”

        THE PROBLEMS YOU ARE TALKING ABOUT ARE BASED ON TWO THINGS – PRAYER WAS REMOVED FROM SCHOOL AND YOUNG PARENTS DO NOT GO TO CHURCH.

        ONE DAY WHILE “SUBBING” FOR AN ELEVENTH/TWELFTH-GRADE MATH CLASS, I SENT A STUDENT TO THE OFFICE FOR CURSING. THE PRINCIPAL CALLED THE STUDENT’S MOTHER AND TOLD HER TO COME “PICK UP” HER CHILD. WHEN THE MOTHER ARRIVED, SHE CALLED THE PRINCIPAL EVERY “MF-BOMB” IN BOOK. SHE STATED, [sic], “You mean you called me up here to tell me my child is suspended for cursing?…I expect my child to curse at school with his friends…”

        I DO NOT CARE HOW TALENTED A TEACHER IS – NO TEACHER WANTS TO “PUT-UP” WITH SUCH “CRAP.”

        CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

      • CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

        “Vigilant,”

        THE TITLE OF THE ARTICLE IS “SCHOOL IS TOO EASY.” IN NEGRO SCHOOLS THERE IS ALSO A SOCIAL REASON WHY SCHOOL IS “TOO EASY.” “Vigilant,” THERE ARE VERY FEW CAUCASIAN TEACHERS IN INNER-CITY SCHOOLS. THE NEGRO TEACHERS AT THESE SCHOOLS ARE A PART OF THE NEGRO COMMUNITY – THEY LIVE IN INNER-CITY NEIGHBORHOODS, NOT SUBURBS.

        “Vigilant,” YOU WANT ME TO TALK ABOUT THE WAY IT IS IN A CAUCASIAN SCHOOL. I CAN TELL YOU ABOUT MY CHILDHOOD SCHOOLS – I HAD SEVERAL CAUCASIAN TEACHERS AND CLASSMATES. PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN 2012 DO NOT LOOK LIKE THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE 1970s. I DO NOT KNOW WHAT YOU THINK I SHOULD SAY.

        CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

      • Vigilant

        CAH shouts, “THE PROBLEMS YOU ARE TALKING ABOUT ARE BASED ON TWO THINGS – PRAYER WAS REMOVED FROM SCHOOL AND YOUNG PARENTS DO NOT GO TO CHURCH.”

        Sorry if your myopia prevents you from seeing things head on. While the TWO things you mention are symptomatic of the state our society is in, they are not the root causes in toto.

        Tell me what school prayer or church attendance has to do with relaxation of academic standards and we might have something to talk about. Explain to us how the socialist programming in schools and universities is impacted by a failure to attend church or say a prayer in school. Or why the requirements for a teaching certificate are a shadow of what they used to be.

        Relate the self-esteem movement or environmentalist programming to these things. Then explain why SAT scores have tanked since the mid-1960s. No sir, the genesis of these problems is far more complex that the two things you wish to reduce them to.

        P.S. AND STOP CAPITALIZING EVERY LETTER! Are you so dense as to not realize that that’s shouting in Cyberetiquette? Shouting does NOT get your point across any more forcefully.

      • http://att.net Alice

        Hello Christofher Allen I agree with you that black children grow quickly compare to other races. I think black children have special genes to allow them to mature quickly, but mental capability stop develop compare to other races.

      • Robert Smith

        Hey Alice, how’s the breeding of that there master race going for you?

        Rob

      • Michael J.

        CAH,
        I agree with most of your sentiments though your presentation is a bit neanderthalish. The source of your frustration that keeps you clumsily dancing around the epicenter without actually nailing it can be summed up in two words, “Political Correctness”. Please don’t take offense, but search the aforementioned subject and experience the relief of at least knowing who the enemy is. You may even be surprised to find that the events you describe were designed by none other than Karl Marx and implemented by his desciples.

      • 45caliber

        Alice:

        You are correct about the blacks maturing earlier than others. That is one reason most high school football players are black – they are fully mature physically by 17. Whites don’t mature fully until about 25. Other races mature at different ages. This has been established by study. The blacks are used for sports because they are larger and stronger at that young age than others are. The coachs know it. While I don’t know about their mental abilities – the argument is still out on that – the sports jocks aren’t forced to learn since they are involved with the sports program and most of the rest mimic them. I believe that all sports programs in high school should be reduced to PE and perhaps an occasional game against the nearest school only. No organized sports in school at all. And no competition at all in any areas between schools except for fun.

      • Nadzieja Batki

        This is a reply to Kinetic1.
        Between 6:30 and 6:45 AM we can hear the school bus picking up students for school, given the time the students and parents have gotten up really early and are not fully functioning. By the time the students make it home after school activities they are brain tired as well as physically tired. Their parents are tired from work as well.
        Do you believe that parents have any input in how and the students learn? Their teachers also have limited influence. So it leaves that the students are peer trained by their own peer age students. If you have a problem with believing this, why is the students have difficulty relating to different age groups.

      • Nancy in Nebraska

        Discipline disappeared a long time ago. You can blame the flaky psychological association for that. They taught parents that spankings were child abuse. They told us that if we scolded our children we would hurt their self esteem. We were supposed to reward them with behavior modification and put them in time out. We should give them stickers for everything they do, including using the toilet! We should give them trophies for sitting out in the field picking dandelions, when they were supposed to be playing soccer. We can’t let anyone hurt their feelings and everything has to be fair! We placed their self esteem above everything. The problem is, self esteem can’t be given. It has to be earned. You gain esteem by doing something well. We’ve raised a few generations of self indulgent ninnies who think that everything should be given to them. They think that rules don’t apply to them. Same goes for their children.

      • Kinetic1

        CAH,
        I have seen the situation you have described in poor, mostly black neighborhoods, but I have seen the same in poor Hispanic and White neighborhoods as well. It is not a question of race, but of social conditioning. No one wants to be perceived as poor or socially inept, so they present a false front. Clothes and cars are visible evidence of our social standing that we carry with us, while our homes are seen only by those who would truly know us. Call it pride, avarice or “keeping up with the jones’”, but people in every level of society are guilty of it. Why else would an otherwise intelligent person choose to lease a Mercedes when they could own a Toyota Camry for the same money? With the exception of those who can write it off as a business expense, leasing is a poor (and financially ignorant) man’s way to drive more than they can afford.

        I’m sorry that your experience as a substitute teacher has left you so bitter and biased towards one race of people, but I can assure you that poor taste, envy and violence is not the exclusive property of African Americans.

      • Kinetic1

        Nadzieja Batki,
        As I noted elsewhere, the decline of the single worker family has been tragic for our children. My wife and I decided years ago to accept a lower family income in exchange for having one parent at home to raise our children. We were not, however so fortunate with my eldest child. We did hire a local high school student to watch him when he was 11 or so, but once he was old enough to care for himself it was an empty house. Were my wife and I tired when we got home from work? You bet. Still, we took responsibility for helping him with his home work, discussing what he had learned and ensuring that he understood his lessons. On the weekends we discussed issues beyond what he was being taught in school. To this day my son feels more at home with people 10 years his senior than with those in his own age group.

        I feel for those who have to work more than one job to get by. I do not, however have anything good to say about parents who have their children involved in so many extracurricular activities that they are too tired to learn or who devote so much time to their carriers that they have nothing left for their kids. A child’s education is the responsibility of their parents, and so it is up to the parents to ensure that their child is receiving the education they deserve, no matter how hard it may be. No one ever said parenting was easy.

      • CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

        “Michael J,”

        I SPOKE CLEARLY. I DO NOT KNOW WHAT “epicenter” YOU THINK I WAS TRYING TO AVOID. I KNOW NOTHING OF Karl Marx; MANY PEOPLE ON THIS SITE SEEM TO BE HIS FANS. ANYTHING WHICH HAPPENED IN THE WORLD AFTER 1600, IS NOT INTERESTING TO ME.

        CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

      • CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

        “45caliber,”

        GOOD POINTS. THE IMPACT OF NEGRO-BODY SIZE ON EDUCATION IN THE CLASSROOM WAS THE POINT I WAS TRYING TO MAKE THIS MORNING TO “Kinetic1″ AND “Vigilant” – YET, THE WERE “HUNG-UP” ON MY USAGE OF CAPITAL LETTERS. NEGRO SCHOOLS ARE N-O-T-H-I-N-G LIKE CAUCASIAN SCHOOLS. IN REFERENCE TO THIS TOPIC, I THINK I AM TALKING TO THE WRONG CROWD.

        CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

      • CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

        “Kinertic1″ (12 JULY; 1:40 PM),

        THIS MORNING WHEN I FIRST DEALT WITH THIS TOPIC, I HAD NO IDEA IT WOULD BE AN ISSUE DIFFICULT TO DISCUSS – BASED ON RACIAL GROUNDS. SOMETIMES IT IS GREAT TO KNOW THE RACE OF THE OTHER COMMENTERS.

        “Kinetic1,” I HAVE READ YOUR POSTS IN OTHER THREADS. BASED ON THOSE COMMENTS, I ASSUMED YOU ARE CAUCASIAN MALE. YET, YOUR COMMENTS TO ME AT 1:40 PM HAVE CAUSED ME TO HAVE DOUBT ABOUT YOUR RACE. “Kinetic1,” SIR, IF YOU ARE A MALE OF COLOR, IT WAS NOT MY GOAL TO EMBARASS YOU.

        SINCE I AM A PERSON WHO ENJOYS CAUCASIAN CULTURE, I ENJOY TELLING CAUCASIANS NEGRO “SECRETS.” I AM SORRY IF MY SHARING OF THESE “NEGRO SECRETS” BOTHERED YOU, SIR.

        CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

      • box-bb-car

        Discipline has been a problem for some time, an not just in inner city schools. I went to school duriing the 60′s and 70′s and I saw the swing in attitudes first hand. Our high school was composed of 70% minorities, and we went through the race riots of the early 70′s (about 3 per year) Taught me a lot about life, little about acedemics. From watching our situation, I saw there were a handfull on each side who were the instigators of trouble, then a large group of followers on each side. Then there were the rest of us. The parents who really gave a crap were the ones who’s kids stayed out of trouble (or at least tried to, was not easy) And that group was about evenly split on race.
        The school taught to the median, which on entry was about a 6th grade level. It did not improve much by graduation. I breezed through, and promptly found my self flunking college courses. I ended up teaching myself remedially what I should have learned in high school. It took some time, but I eventually obtained an EE degree. I have seen many here expound on the parent’s influence, and they are correct. However, even if the parents are unwilling, there need to be role models that show the kid there is another way. many of those who I went to school with were not being raised by thier parents, but rather by grand parents or aunts/uncles. I had a couple who’s parents, though good people, simply did not give importance to education. I had others who’s parents were drunks or addicts. Both of those groups outcome were dependent upon external examples and influences. I saw some devolve into the same or similar lives as their parents, others go on to acheive well. That may be why I attempt to open the eyes of those who I see have an interest in a better life, but whose examples of that life are limited. Not sure if you would call it mentoring, but sometimes people just need to be pointed in the right direction an have an ear lent for them to succeed. Parent’s should do this, however not all are capable or interested.

      • Robert Smith

        Looks like the right wing around here deals with genetics with the same kind of crap as they deal with creationism.

        Once in awhile could you at least buy a fact?

        Rob

    • Kinetic1

      Harold Olsen,
      Please, do grace us with the evidence of your accusations. “…many teachers just grade on whether students who(sic) up or not. If they show up. they get an “A.” Really? I have never met a teacher who is so cavalier, but if there are as “many” as you suggest I suppose I will meet one soon.

    • Kinetic1

      Vigilant,
      Thank you for your reasoned response. While it may come as a surprise to many on this site, I have long held that it was a sad day when adults began telling children that it was ok to address them by their first name. My children have been raised to address adults by sir and mame until they are directed to do otherwise.

      It’s easy to place blame on liberal and conservative attitudes, and I appreciate your acknowledgment of both sides bearing some blame. Watch an episode of Ozzy and Harriet, paying particular attention to how adults address each other. It’s no surprise when an attorney is greeted as “Mister”, but when was the last time you heard anyone show such basic respect to a worker laying concrete, or a grocery clerk? We, as a society have marginalized those occupations that were once respectable. Milk men (now all but gone due to economic conditions), plumbers, gardeners, even grade school teachers are treated as second class citizens whose lower income seems to make them less deserving. I spent many years as a bicycle mechanic, but you would think I was nothing but a kid playing with his toys. If I were working in the pits for a NASCAR team, Americans might have looked up to me, but building wheels for an international cycling team means little here. Until we, as a society return to showing respect for each other, regardless of income or position, I don’t see things improving.

      • box-bb-car

        Got a chuckle from the sir and maam statement. I was brought up that way. My folks neighbors were always Mr and Ms, and remained that way even when I was in my 30′s and 40′s. We do see a lot more of it here in the south ( I grew up in ILL am now in TN), so my children are being raised that way. I still address those with whom I am not familiar as sir or maam, (or Dr if applicable)out of courtesy and respect. I am a consultant, and it goes a long way in building a relationship with the client.

  • cawmun cents

    If those who teach are willing to teach,rather than to subjugate,indoctrinate,alienate,and cause hate,the they would abandon their tendency to manipulate.
    They are brainwashing the youth of our nation into people who are easily satiated by their inane form of governance.Just be one of the go along to get along crowd and everything will be peachy keen,that is what they are teaching our kids.You can have everything without having to lift a finger to supply it for yourself.
    We will supply it for you.They tell our youth.
    We will make the warmongering genration who came before you pay for it,they say to our children.
    But meanwhile,back at the schoolyard,how many could have known that they were actually conscripting the future generations to abject slavery?
    But it’s so easy.
    Easy to be kind to your fellow man,unless they have yet to be born.
    We got ours,they will say.It’s up to you to get your own,they will tell the future generations,right?
    But whose backs will all this ride upon?
    Yours and mine friends.
    We are the ones who stood idly by and let them sublet our future generations into abject slavery.They will blame us.
    Cheers!
    -CC.

    • 45caliber

      cawmun:

      you are quite correct. They are spending too much time on indoctrination to actually be able to teach. Look up Clinton’s requirements for his educational program, Goals 2000. It was all about indoctrination. How can the teachers teach the basics if they have to indoctrinate the students first? What is really bad is that the teachers are already indoctrinated and are only trying to pass it along.

  • CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

    I WISH THERE WAS A CAUCASIAN TEACHER ON THIS SITE WHO WORKS IN AN INNER-CITY SCHOOL. I BELIEVE THAT TEACHER WOULD “BACK ME UP.” FOR SOME REASON, I SEEM TO HAVE UPSET “Kinetic1″ AND “Vigilant.” TEACHERS IN INNER-CITY SCHOOLS DO NOT GIVE A FIFTY-MINUTE LECTURE INFUSED WITH ENTHUSIASTIC INTERACTION AND COOPERATION FROM STUDENTS. MORE THAN TWENTY-FIVE PERCENT OF CLASS TIME IS SPENT HANDLING DISCIPLINE PROBLEMS. INNER-CITY TEACHERS GET LITTLE COOPERATION FROM PARENTS.

    CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HOTON

    • Vigilant

      ” I SEEM TO HAVE UPSET “Kinetic1″ AND “Vigilant.”

      We aren’t the ones shouting, son.

      • CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

        “Vigilant,”

        DO NOT CALL ME, “son.” IF I ADDRESS YOU, I WILL CALL YOU “MALE,” “MAN” OR “SIR.” CALLING ME, “son,” WILL “ROLL THE BALL QUICKLY DOWNHILL.”

        CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

      • Vigilant

        OK, how’s this?

        ” I SEEM TO HAVE UPSET “Kinetic1″ AND “Vigilant.”

        We aren’t the ones shouting, sir.

        P.S. You’re still shouting.

      • CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

        “Vigilant,”

        I THINK I HAVE MADE MYSELF CLEAR ON THIS SITE IN REFERENCE TO MY PREFERENCE FOR CAUCASIANS. ALL OF MY LIFE I HAVE DEALT WITH NEGROES WHO CONSIDER ME TO BE A TRAITOR. THAT IS QUITE FINE. “Vigilant,” YOU DO NOT HAVE TO CALL ME, “sir.”

        MY POINT WAS, WE ARE ADULTS – WE SHOULD ADDRESS EACH OTHER AS ADULTS. SURELY YOU KNOW, BEING CALLED, “boy”, BY A CAUCASIAN MALE (OF ANY AGE) IS OFFENSIVE TO ADULT-NEGRO MALES. IF YOU WANT THE NEGRO-MALE MIND TO GO TO THOUGHTS OF SLAVERY AND “Jim Crow,” USE OF THE WORD, “boy” IS A QUICK WAY TO DO IT.

        CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

      • Vigilant

        And you continue to shout.

        Do you have a mental block when it comes to cyberetiquette? You’ve been told umpteen times but you persist. You want to talk about adult behavior and respect, yet you have no respect for your fellow posters.

        Well, here it is one more time: “ON THE INTERNET, USAGE OF CAPITALS FOR ALL LETTERS IS CONSIDERED AS SHOUTING AND IS RUDE AND DISRESPECTFUL. WHAT PART OF THAT DO YOU NOT UNDERSTAND?”

      • CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

        “Vigilant,”

        PEOPLE SHOULD BE ABLE TO SPEAK THEIR MINDS IN A MANNER WHICH IS A REPRESENTATION OF THEMSELVES. “CYBER-ETIQUETTE” IS A FORM OF CENSORSHIP DEVISED BY THE “COMPUTER-AGE” CROWD. OLDER PEOPLE HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY. I READ OTHERS’ WORDS – NOT, THEIR WRITING STYLE.

        I AM USED TO DEALING WITH PEOPLE WHO SIGN, “X,” BECAUSE THEY ARE UNABLE TO SIGN THEIR NAMES. YET, WHEN I AM ENGAGED IN SOCIAL CONVERSATION WITH THESE PEOPLE – WHO COULD CARE LESS ABOUT, “CYBER-ETIQUETTE” – I HAVE SOME OF THE BEST TIMES OF MY LIFE.

        CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

      • CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

        “Vigilant,”

        SINCE MY CAPITAL LETTERS ARE A PROBLEM, THIS WILL BE MY LAST POST. I WILL SIMPLY ENJOY READING THE COMMENTS OF OTHERS AND STOP POSTING. ONE CAN NOT BE FORCED TO ADHERE TO “CYBER-ETIQUETTE.”

        CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

    • 45caliber

      Chris:

      I will agree with you about the problems with inner-city schools. I knew a NY teacher who refused to get her accedidation there because they required all teachers to teach the first two years in NYC. She said the only way they could teach there was to stand with their back to the board even when they wrote on it to insure no student attacked them from behind.

      The real problem with inner city schools is a lack of discipline by parents and teachers. Of course the teachers are not allowed to do any by orders from the feds.

      Incidently, the real problem with your comments is that they are all in caps. It is harder to read that way.

      • CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

        “45caliber,”

        THANK YOU, SIR. YOUR COMMENTS MEAN A LOT TO ME.

        ABOUT TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO NEGRO-COLLEGE GRADUATES DECIDED TO TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR TEACHING “AFROCENTRIC” VALUES TO NEGRO CHILDREN. IF I WAS SITTING IN A ROOM WITH NEGRO MALES – AGES 15-60 – AND MENTIONED THE NAME, W. E. B. DuBois, EVERYONE WOULD “PERK-UP” AND BE EXCITED ABOUT THE CONVERSATION. ON THE OTHER HAND, IF I MENTION THE NAME, William Penn, I WILL GET TWO REACTIONS: I). SOME HAVE NEVER HEARD OF HIM; OR, II). SOME WOULD SAY HE WAS A, “racist-white man.”

        NEGRO TEACHERS IN INNER-CITY SCHOOLS ARE HAVING A DIFFICULT TIME TRYING TO GET NEGRO STUDENTS INTERESTED IN, “white-folks’ subjects.” NEGRO SCORES ON EXIT EXAMS, “ACT” AND “GRE” PROVE MY POINT. IF YOU ARE A GRADUATE STUDENT IN FINE ARTS, A “GRE” SCORE IS NOT REQUIRED FOR ADMISSION; YET, IT IS STILL DIFFICULT FOR NEGROES TO GO TO GRADUATE SCHOOL.

        CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

    • Nancy in Nebraska

      Christopher, I have a friend who used to teach in an inner city school. I understand what you’re saying. It’s a difficult thing when you’re trying to teach and you can’t even get the students to sit down and stop talking. Worse yet when you get no support from their parents. Unfortunately, the changes MUST come from the people in the black community. They won’t take advice from white people who are perceived as the enemy. The black community especially needs for their men to be men. These boys need to be taught by black men. Unless the black adults start being responsible and hold their children to being responsible I see no solution. You need to influence your peers. Make them see how important it is to their children’s future that they be taught to respect and behave. Teach them that education is the key to a better life. Good luck, Christopher.

      • CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

        “Nancy in Nebraska,”

        THANK YOU, MA’AM! YOUR COMMENTS ARE GREATLY APPRECIATED. I WAS ABOUT TO GO CRAZY IN THIS THREAD! I FELT I WAS UNDER ATTACK!

        CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

      • Nancy in Nebraska

        You don’t have to thank me Christopher. I think that as a black person, you have a lot to offer that the majority of us can’t understand. My daughter in law and the mother of my grandson is black. She and my son are very responsible and I know that my grandson will not end up as these boys. But still, I think that the more we understand the situation, the more we can do about it. I think it’s horrible when people don’t EXPECT as much from a black child. Too many people of all races are happy to let the government raise their children. They need to wake up and realize that the government is not doing a very good job. They need to take back their parenting! As to the issue of feeling like you’re being attacked, I think it’s simply because you post in all capital letters. It really bothers people. They consider it as you shouting at them. Is your caps lock key stuck? I hope that you won’t become discouraged and stop posting. I think you have something to offer.

    • Kinetic1

      CAH,
      “INNER-CITY TEACHERS GET LITTLE COOPERATION FROM PARENTS.”
      Almost my point exactly, however you have, once again limited yourself to “inner city” children. I know teachers who work in inner city schools. I agree that the problems they face are often worse than in more affluent neighborhoods, but that is not to say that these issues do not exist there as well. Parental guidance and respect are sorely lacking in most schools these days.

      As for my being “upset”, it is simply a reaction to your apparent belief that being a “negro” makes one more likely to be ignorant, violent and lacking in respect.

    • Kinetic1

      CAH,
      If I am to understand your later posts, you are an African American who prefers the term Negro. As such, I will respect your wish and use the term Negro when responding to you. I must admit, I am now more surprised than ever at your previous posts.

  • Grammy

    Christopher, you are evidently UNteachable. A teacher who will not learn is a very bad example. Your language skills are terrible and you evidently don’t know how to properly use capital letters either.

    • CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

      “Grammy,”

      I AM NOT A TEACHER. I WAS A SUBSTITUTE TEACHER FOR A SHORT PERIOD OF TIME. I AM A CLASSICAL MUSICIAN. YOUR OPINION OF MY WRITING SKILLS IS YOURS.

      CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

    • 45caliber

      Granny:

      I once saw a news article on the TV about a woman who did not get her contract renewed after the first year of teaching English in high school. She insisted it was because the school was racist. The news media put her on the screen for a couple of sentences. She began, “They ain’t got no …” I counted seven grammatical errors in the first sentence! No wonder they didn’t renew her contract to teach English!

    • Nadzieja Batki

      Now we know Horton does not care how we read or don’t read his comments. Let him be a stubborn jackass.
      We can make typos in sentence structure and spelling without seeing them until after we post.

      • CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

        “Nadziejz Batki,”

        OUT OF COURTESY, I WILL CONTINUE TO READ YOUR COMMENTS. IF YOU WISH, YOU MAY IGNORE MINE.

        CHRISTOPHER ALLEN HORTON

  • Polski

    I graduated from the University of Michigan with a BS in Aeronautical Engineering in 1957. Even then, the students from Canada, Asia, and South and Central America were 3 years ahead of the US in education knowledge. Nowadays the only thing students are capable of doing is working at Walmart or McDonald’s.

  • http://comcast.net David

    Leave no child behind, Teaching to the test, and graduation exams are all mandated by the federal goverment and the state and without compliance school funding is minimized. When a school system is threatened by a state take over, it will come up with ways to ensure test scores go up. When an educator’s jobs are contingent on the performance of their students they will see to it the students pass. When government gets out of education and the people who know the least about schools leave matters to local school boards and the teaching professionals you will see a better performance from students.

    • 45caliber

      And let them teach the basics, as they were meant to do, and leave all the “feel-good” stuff the feds want them to learn out of it.

  • 45caliber

    The educational standards were lowered primarily so the schools could insist that the minority students were doing as well as the rest were. When I first moved here about 25 years ago, my kids were still in school. My wife stayed where I had been with the kids to allow them to finish the school year (it was the first of April) while I worked here. I checked around and found that there was ONE school district in the county (a small one) that still adhered to standards. They brought in volunteer tutors to keep the slow students up with the rest. The other schools simply made everything easier so they could give the slow students A’s like the rest. So none learn very well.

    Further, how can you teach science or math when 1) the teachers don’t know it themselves and 2) they have to teach all the other stuff required now such as sex and environmentalism? When I attended, we had 6 classes a day in high school – and generally one was study hall. My children had to have 7 classes in the same time period. So they spent less time at what they did study. They had a good science teacher at the time my kids went – but she retired and now the one they have simply follows what the book says without any idea if it is right or wrong. Two of the math teachers my kids had didn’t know how to work the algebra problems they were giving the class to study. And they wonder why the kids don’t do as well.

  • KimV

    I agree with Dave and 45caliber. I have two children (now grown) ten years apart. It was amazing to see the difference in the school curriculum between the two. My oldest graduated and went to college knowing that nothing was free and she would have to work hard and learn as much as possible to get through life. My second was pushed through each grade. She has a problem with dyslexia and did not pass a single spelling test throughout elementary school. I voiced my concerns to her teacher and the teacher looked me right in the eye and stated, “Don’t worry, it’s not on the test. Some kids just can’t spell”! I threw a fit, but was told by the school administrator that the school had to make sure everyone was promoted in order to maintain their funding. Now my sister’s children were going through the system and she has run into teachers stating they are too busy trying to teach English as a SECOND language that they cannot spend time on complicated things like sentence structure and punctuation.

    • KimV

      - My sister is now home-schooling her children.

  • chuckb

    the real root of the problem is; “the teachers unions” the system in california has been broken for many years, in fact all the way back to the sixties. the kids are only taught what the teacher can or is allowed to teach, most are on the same level as the students, they received their education in the same classrooms.
    the liberal faction starting in the seventies slowly but surely lowered the curriculum and eased in the progressive ideology. the history books were revised and math for the most part went out the window. some bay area schools started teaching by music, the only way they could reach their students.
    i knew a person who handled the certification of potential teachers at a small college, the failure rate was 67% taking an examination equivalent to a fourth grade test. dear old liberal california.

  • GunbearerM1G

    When an exceptionally bright, intelligent, capable student does well in school, the other students, who aren’t doing as well for some reason, immediately make this capable student the object of their ridicule. Then comes the bullying and cyber bullying.

    When I was in school, you needed to learn the necessary skills to be promoted. Most kids had self-respect and did not want to be one of the “slow” kids.

    Now, the liberal powers that be, since the late ’60′s and early ’70′s, kept up the mantra that grades were not all that important, it was so-called learning for the joy of learning stuff and nonsense.

    Fast forward to the present day. Perhaps our student wants to join the police force or fire-fighting services. You have to pass a written exam just to be considered. Some of the questions may be in essay form. If you join the Navy, your promotion was a good deal dependent on how well you did on the written exam. Civilian jobs, such as non-destructive testing, welding inspector, and quality control in general, have a written exam as well as a practical exam. These jobs require skills in technical report writing as well.

    Now, kids, don’t learn too much, lest you be thought of as a—gasp!—–Nerd!

    • Blah blah

      Excellent post. This is a major problem. I just graduated high school in June and through my whole educational experience I have seen this issue. Learning is simply “not cool” and my peers would rather party and disrupt class than put forth effort into learning. And standards are so low now that many kids graduated who shouldn’t have.
      Oh well, I’ll be laughing when I’m successful and they work minimum wage jobs.

      • 45caliber

        Blah:

        You are quite correct and should do well in life with that attitude. And when the teachers go along with it, it is even worse. When you go to college, pick something you like. Too many people get a job or a carreer they dislike because they think they will make money there. But they hate their jobs all their lives.

  • box-bb-car

    My father, who recently died at the age of 96, only attended school until the 8th grade. Still, he was one of the better read men I have known, and could compute everyday math issues in his head. He could not walk us through ‘modern’ math when we were kids, but he could come up with the correct answer. He attributed much of his knowledge from the fact that he was educated in a one room school house. He watched as the upper grades were being taught, so when it came time for him to do the lesson, he was prepared. Watching the lower grades allowed him to review. Despite not attending the upper grades and not going to college, He trained himself in welding, farmed and at the age of 73 started his own business. He did impress on us the value of an education, and two of us did get our degree. Dad had saved enough to pay for his and mom’s nursing care till the end.

    And he was not an anomaly in that generation. Another who comes to mind was Eddie Richenbacher, WWI ace, race car driver, and founder of Eastern Airlines. He only went through the 7th grade.

    It may be more of an issue that we have lost the ethic, or the need, to push ourselves, not only in everyday endeavors, but also to great works. Much of our educational lapse starts at home, but then is compounded by our current educational system. We tend to discourage those who would experiment on their own and learn just for the sake of learning or wanting to do it themselves. We were brought up to be self reliant. Few now are.

  • Jeremy Leochner

    A key issue seems to be that the schools are oriented towards getting higher grades and higher pass rates. While such things are important I worry that they have gone to far down this road. It has gotten to the point where all that they are concerned about seems to be passing the students whether or not the students actually understand the subject. A lot of high school students struggle when they get to college. I know that my first algebra class in high school was far too easy and it handicapped me. I am not sure what the best thing to do is. I would say we need to look into increased funding so schools can higher more teachers and tutors. Try to find a way to decrease class room size so teachers can give more one and one attention. In an environment like that they can afford to go into more complex areas and discuss more about the fine points of things like mathematical formulas and historical events.

    • 45caliber

      I know of two schools (Portland, TX, and Ingleside, TX) that graduate several people a year with 2nd and 3rd grade educations. It would harm the child if he was held back! Within a couple of years, they simply cannot do the work so they fail to try. Ingleside even had a class for such people where they did no homework and weren’t expected to complete but a couple of chapters from the books other students completed each year. Other schools are as bad.

  • s c

    Nancy in Nebraska, Kenetic 1 and Grammy, Amerika ‘public education’ started down the road to ____ when the Soviets put Sputnik into orbit [late 1957]. Since then, what we call “education” is an incredibly expensive farce that turns out kids who can’t read, write or think (probably can’t chew gum or walk and breathe at the same time). When unions got into the mix, that put ‘education’ into a huge septic tank.
    In business, when you produce an inferior product, you eventually are forced OUT of business. In Amerika, schools that produce inferior students receive tons of $, kids get hosed by ‘experts, and nothing changes.
    Compare Amerika’s test results with the rest of the world. I won’t waste any time reminding folks which group of political criminals and spenders were allowed to “run” that circus. What matters is that now [thanks to generations of self-esteem schemes, social engineering and THROW MORE $ AT IT], the only place to get a decent education is in a small community. If you live in a population center, GOOD LUCK. WHEN will people realize that a failure is a failure? Get those kids out of public schools, citizens.
    You have four options: 1) private school 2) church school 3) homeschool or 4) start wearing chains. Einstein’s definition of insanity applies to MANY situations, folks. He said (roughly), ‘When you do the same things over and over and expect different results, THAT’S insanity. That is also PUBLIC EDUCATION. CHOOSE! Make a decision and maybe you will deserve to be called adults.

    • Nancy in Nebraska

      I’m a big proponent of home schooling. However, it can’t be a reality for most people. I think that people need to attend school board meetings and be as involved as you can be. We need to insist on changes to the curricula. These people are elected. If you can get a group of people to attend school board meetings and make some noise, they will listen. But as long as we sit back and let them do what they want, we will lose. Our children will lose! We need to insist on it!

  • Geo_jojo

    I graduated from high school over 60 years ago and have been watching the school system constantly and slowly deteriorate ever since. When the Federal government got into the school system is when it started it’s demise. It seems with every new president, the were more federal programs and more control of the school system was taken over by the feds. The more the feds got involved, the worse it got. Now the federal government has almost total control which is the problem because they now indoctrinate kids from kindergarten to prepare them for a life of Liberalism, socialism and finally communism. I can’t blame the government, they have their agenda, it’s the citizens of the country who are completely and fully to blame for the mess. Americans have allowed the government to do anything they wanted, without resistance, and it’s too late now to stop the power and control of the federal government. Our country is lost without any chance of rescue.

  • Ms. PAZ

    I started 1st grade at a small country school in 1955, still in the era of learning to read phonetically & the Dick and Jane reading primers.
    We moved to town when I was in 4th grade. There were enough students that each grade had two or three classes. The students were divided among the classes according to how well they were doing & how well they learned. We knew that the best were in this class and the most challenged, least motivated, problem kids were in this other classroom, with those who were considered just average in another.
    The teachers taught to the level of the students in their classroom, and challenged them to stretch beyond that.
    Someone somewhere determined that that system of education was not in the best interests of all the students and thus MAINSTREAMING was implemented — all levels mixed in all classrooms. That resulted in the teachers being forced to teach to the lower level, leaving the best & brightest unchallenged and bored.
    It was noticed by our family in the early 1960s that History was being revised & the story of the Declaration of Independence, the crafting of the U.S. Constitution and our founding fathers & mothers was watered down and considered much less important.
    My daughter was born in 1980, so I encountered a whole new way of teaching. I volunteered to grade papers for her teacher. One day I went to her because I was so upset by the utter lack of sentence structure & proper grammar, the poor spelling & the worst handwriting I believe I’ve ever seen. That seasoned teacher, with tears in her eyes, replied that the standard of that day to NOT based on ability to express the correct answer coherently, but that that student only need show they grasped at least part of the information taught.
    By working with her I was able to help her improve her writing skills but all the way to her college degree she asked me to edit her papers.
    Now I see that my grand children, born in 1996 & 2000 are being short changed even more! Neither one can write in cursive, Penmanship is no longer taught so this group will print all their lives.
    The student no longer needs to know the material to be advanced to the next grade. That is known as ‘age progression’. The student with learning problems is not receiving help needed to learn, just passed along to the next teacher.
    Spelling? That’s what spell check is for, but it still shows GR8 as an error.
    Addition? Subtraction? Simple multiplication & division? That’s why cell phones have a calculator built in!
    People learn in different ways but the schools now teach to the “one size fits all” theory. It doesn’t.

  • http://www.facebook.com/dan.mancuso.56 Dan Mancuso

    It’s been pretty obvious for a while now that the ‘penetration and permeation’ tactics of Fabian Socialism of the last 100 years or so has been very effective, especially in the education department. (see Dr. John Coleman’s book, “ONE WORLD ORDER: Socialist Dictatorship”, Bridger House Publishers, Inc., ISBN 0-9640104-9-6, you won’t find it through any mainstream bookseller) In the public school system of all Western countries, they have managed to dumb down the student population for generations. As proof; I saw a site a few years ago that showed three grade 12 tests for graduation on general knowldge, and math etc. Your basic 3 R’s. One from today, one from the late 50′s and one from the 1890′s .I graduated in the early 70′s. The present one to me seemed like what a 2nd or 3rd grader might whiz – in the 70′s, The one from the 50′s seemed quite difficult – and this with 30 or 40 years of self study behind me since high school. The one from the 1890′s was pretty much beyond me. If you are wondering why there are so many sheeple today, look to the public school educatiuon system!

    • Jeremy Leochner

      As a product of the public school system I can assure you I am no sheerson. I believe that’s the singular form of sheeple.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100003406368110 Pups

        My son will be 7 in just a few weeks. He absolutely hated the “reader” books. I rellay had a hard time getting him to read them to me. However, I have recently found several series that he absolutely loves. TIME for Kids, Barron’s Get Ready…Get Set…Read! series, and the DK Readers are all proving to be winners with my first grader.Right now, we’re reading Dinosaur Dinners, a DK Reader book. It’s all about what different dinosaurs ate, and how you can tell by their physical characteristics. These books have terrific pictures, and the reading isn’t dull and boring.My son loves to read, but something someone told him at school almost destroyed his love for reading. My son has mild to moderate hearing loss, inherited from me, and he also had fluid in his ears quite often when he was learning language. Because he has been learning to say words all over again, he is very careful when he reads, so that he can say his words perfectly. This woman told my son that he couldn’t read as well as the other boys and girls, and since he likes to do well in things, he didn’t want to read anymore. Finally, I got tired of trying to make him read to me, and I made him tell me what was wrong. I wanted to know why he didn’t want to read anymore, when previously, it was one of his favorite things to do. He broke down in tears when he told me that he “was no good at it” and that he “didn’t know as many words as the other boys and girls”. Needless to say, I cried, too.He never would tell me who told him that. Good thing for her!My son is now a terrific reader, and has near perfect scores on all his tests.Last year, we had a first year teacher. This year, his first grade teacher is a 30+ year veteran of the first grade trenches. It makes all the difference in the world! She knows all about handling the boys. DebMemphis, TN

  • Eileen Hooker

    Math Teacher for 44 years

    It was the parent’s that wanted the material to be easier so their child didn’t have to work so hard…. after all they had OTHER things to do besides study! (One of my most interesting parent conference was with a girl’s parents that couldn’t understand why she did so poorly in my trig class. The parents didn’t think that over 5050 text minutes during one month was excessive!” And if student didn’t do well parent’s put a lot of pressure for higher, unearned grades — grade inflation is a major problem — because their child wouldn’t be able to get into the college/university of his or her choice. It was extremely difficult to maintain high standards which I did for 44 years — 35 years in public schools and 9 years in a private school. My students didn’t particulary “like” me, but they respected me, because I respected them. They finally appreciated me and what they had learned in their math classes after they went to college, because they performed very well in college. Many times they would say, your class was harder than what I had in college…. And I also did adjunct teaching at a community college and they had the same attitude…. It’s too hard. Now that many of those students can’t get jobs, they claim that they were not prepared. However, no teacher can “LEARN” any one; the learning is the student’s responsibility. HOWEVER, the teacher’s responsibility is to facilitate that process, and to coach and push their students so that they reach their potential.

  • Middlemant@2012

    I Have Spent A number of years in the class room,(my Son,And then my Grand son)As a teachers aid.There are many factors That one should take into account ! The child’s home life!!.If he is from a broken home,of course there will be problems.The way a child is raised will indeed show up in the class room.Then of course there is the question about the teacher,or teachers!!I’ve worked with both,the good,and the bad!!!I’ve learned quickly how to respond correctly to the students questions And be clam ,and cool,even if I had to explain the same question several times over ,Let me just state,that I have seen some very good teachers almost lose “it” while in the class room(which proves.we are all humans),It takes a special kind of person to teach school(,when its done right),You must have a friendly attitude,And lots.and lots of patience!!!The question about” schools being easy”,Thats not the case with the schools I Helped,(Most of them were not public!!)

  • my 2¢ worth

    Of course it’s viewed as ‘too easy’ by the majority of students.. Education has altered it’s focus on the challenged and the mentally lacking.. That the normal average student has to follow those rules is inconsequential as they graduate right along with them and the institution gains in federal aid.

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