Romney, Obama Battle Over Who’s The Average Joe

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Seizing the 99 percent zeitgeist, President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama are increasingly trying to appeal to blue collar Americans as an alternative to the perceived Gordon Gekko persona of GOP Presidential contender Mitt Romney.

According to The Hill, Obama has used recent speeches to peddle himself as a regular guy talking about such things as having trouble paying off his student loans and his care for families with tight budgets.

“I got my start standing with working folks who’d lost their jobs, folks who had lost their hope because the steel plants had closed down,” Obama said during a speech Tuesday. “I didn’t like the idea that they didn’t have anybody fighting for them. The same reason I got into this business is the same reason I’m here today.”

Republicans say that it is unlikely that anyone believes Obama is a regular guy, considering he spends a great deal of time rubbing elbows with Hollywood elite and hosting campaign dinners where plates are sold for thousands of dollars.

Media, in recent months, have attacked Romney for comments (sometimes taken out of context) about his wealth, including his comment about his wife’s two Cadillacs, assertion that he “likes being able to fire people,” saying he “isn’t concerned about the very poor” and his infamous $10,000 debate bet with Rick Perry. The candidate, in an attempt to portray himself as a NASCAR fan, asserted this week that he has several friends who own NASCAR teams.

Financial filing reports show that both Romney and Obama are favored by wealthy campaign contributors far more than any of the other 2012 Presidential contenders. A separate report by The Hill shows that Romney and Obama both receive hefty contributions from wealthy backers who also spent hundreds of thousands of dollars lobbying to alter Federal legislation.

A poll conducted by CNN and ORC earlier this month shows that most Americans have a clear belief about which candidate most favors the middle class in the United States: 52 percent said Ron Paul, 28 percent said Romney and 40 percent said Obama.

Sam Rolley

Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After covering community news and politics, Rolley took a position at Personal Liberty Media Group where could better hone his focus on his true passions: national politics and liberty issues. In his daily columns and reports, Rolley works to help readers understand which lies are perpetuated by the mainstream media and to stay on top of issues ignored by more conventional media outlets.

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