Rising Wholesale Prices Fuel Inflation Concerns

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Rising wholesale prices fuel inflation concernsEarlier this month, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke admitted that the United States' economy is "overheated," "growing too quickly" and "short on resources."

Recent data from the Labor Department affirms Bernanke's statements, as well as fuels many economists concerns regarding inflation. On Feb. 16, the agency revealed that wholesale prices in the U.S. increased for a seventh consecutive month in January as the producer price index rose 0.8 percent. The core measure, which excludes volatile foods and energy costs, increased by 0.5 percent, which is the largest jump since October 2008.

These trends have prompted many Americans to consider the need to protect their assets and wealth. Investing in gold and international real estate — commodities that have intrinsic value — are viable options for individuals who are concerned about the sinking value of the U.S. dollar.

Although the outlook for the American housing market is bleak, the UK real estate industry is on the upswing, according to MyIntroducer.com. The National Association of Estate Agents (NAEA) recently reported that the number of registered house-hunters in Britain reached its highest level in six months, making investment in properties attractive both for domestic and foreign investors, such as those from the U.S.

"The message at the end of January 2011 certainly has been that sensibly priced, well located properties will sell and that you will also be able to buy a property at a fair and reasonable price," said Mark Bentley, chairman of the NAEA's Birmingham branch, quoted by the news provider.

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