Research: For Post-Traumatic Stress Relief, Stretching And Meditation Work

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Post-traumatic stress disorder is a condition that is increasingly being diagnosed by physicians throughout the Nation. With more cases of PTSD cropping up, more research of the condition is being conducted—and a recently published study indicates PTSD sufferers can benefit from alternative therapies.

More than 7 million adults are diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a typical year in the U.S. The mental health condition, triggered by a traumatic event, can cause flashbacks, anxiety and other symptoms.

Credit: PHOTOS.COM

A recent study accepted for publication in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM), suggests that those who are afflicted by PTSD can benefit from stretching and meditation.

“Mind-body exercise offers a low-cost approach that could be used as a complement to traditional psychotherapy or drug treatments,” said the study’s lead author, Sang H. Kim, PhD, of the National Institutes of Health. “These self-directed practices give PTSD patients control over their own treatment and have few side effects.”

The study found  that PTSD patients’ high levels of corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and unusually low levels of cortisol – two hormones used to regulate the body’s response to stress— responded favorably in subjects who participated in mind-body exercises for an eight week-period.

After mind-body exercises, patient cortisol levels in the blood rose 67 percent and PTSD checklist scores decreased by 41 percent, indicating the individuals were displaying fewer PTSD symptoms. In comparison, patients who did not do mind-body exercises had a nearly 4 percent decline in checklist scores and a 17 percent increase in blood cortisol levels during the same period.

“Participants in the mind-body intervention reported that not only did the mind-body exercises reduce the impact of stress on their daily lives, but they also slept better, felt calmer and were motivated to resume hobbies and other enjoyable activities they had dropped,” Kim said. “This is a promising PTSD intervention worthy of further study to determine its long-term effects.”

Personal Liberty

Sam Rolley

Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After covering community news and politics, Rolley took a position at Personal Liberty Media Group where could better hone his focus on his true passions: national politics and liberty issues. In his daily columns and reports, Rolley works to help readers understand which lies are perpetuated by the mainstream media and to stay on top of issues ignored by more conventional media outlets.

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  • obfusk8

    America’s last line of defense against this tyrannical out of control federal government is the 2nd Amendment. PTSD will be used to disarm millions of law abiding citizens under Obamacare. A physician will diagnose PTSD and armed thugs will show up and steal the citizen’s guns and ammo. No probable cause. No warrant. No trial. No way to defend oneself. GUILTY of PTSD. If the victim fights back he will be killed on the spot or overwhelmed by force and carted off to a mental hospital, never to be heard from again. Americans had better start connecting the dots or ……

  • tom cook

    I’ll tell you what will work best for PTSD: eliminate payments for it. No one had PTSD from WWII. Trauma? Of course some had trauma. Does anyone go to war and come back unaffected? No. But statistics indicate that as payout for the diagnosis became better, the number of cases increased exponentially. Probably most of these weak sisters are what we called REMF in the Nam.