Ray Kroc Legacy More Than Food

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Ray Kroc, the founder of the world’s most successful fast food chain, was born 107 years ago this week. The one-time milkshake machine salesman was born on Oct. 5, 1902. He opened his first McDonald’s 52 years later. Today, it is almost impossible to grasp how huge the company he founded has become.

McDonald’s has some 15,000 restaurants in this country with 85 percent of them owned by franchisees. And listen to what those outlets have accomplished: More than half of the workers in America today got their very first job at a McDonald’s somewhere. The company has made more millionaires—and especially more black and Hispanic millionaires—than any other entity ever.

Kroc died in January 1984, just 10 months before McDonald’s sold its 50 billionth hamburger. That’s eight burgers for every man, woman, and child on earth today. Today, of the 90 meals a month we consume, the average American eats three of them at McDonald’s. Or at least they get their food there; most customers pick up their order at the drive-up window.

But we’re not all dining on Big Macs. Today McDonald’s sells as much chicken as it does beef. And here’s another fun factoid: Years ago, the Washington, D.C.-area McDonald’s sponsored a television show called "Bozo’s Circus." On it, the company spokesman, Ronald McDonald, was played by a 25-year-old Willard Scott. You’ll know him better as the Today show weatherman who celebrates centenarians’ birthdays.

—Chip Wood

Chip Wood

is the geopolitical editor of PersonalLiberty.com. He is the founder of Soundview Publications, in Atlanta, where he was also the host of an award-winning radio talk show for many years. He was the publisher of several bestselling books, including Crisis Investing by Doug Casey, None Dare Call It Conspiracy by Gary Allen and Larry Abraham and The War on Gold by Anthony Sutton. Chip is well known on the investment conference circuit where he has served as Master of Ceremonies for FreedomFest, The New Orleans Investment Conference, Sovereign Society, and The Atlanta Investment Conference.

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