Rand Cozies Up To The Establishment

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GOP Presidential hopefuls are already jockeying for position in the 2016 Republican primary, and none is doing more jockeying than Senator Rand Paul. It seems this apple fell a long way from the tree.

In 2009, Paul shocked the Republican establishment by riding a wave of Tea Party anti-establishment sentiment and knocking off Trey Grayson (who had the endorsement of Kentucky Senator Mitch McConnell and the State’s party apparatus) to win the seat formerly held by Jim Bunning.

After the primary victory, the establishment went to work on him. A McConnell campaign aide provided Paul with debate coaching. The Republican Senatorial Committee installed on his staff a senior strategist named Trygve Olson. Olson had previously worked at the International Republican Institute, a State Department-funded organization that promotes democracy abroad. The U.S. State Department is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Council on Foreign Relations. If you don’t believe that, take a gander at this roster.

Now Rand is trying to play both sides against the middle. He’s fighting National Security Agency spying and railing against big government and foreign adventurism on the one hand and endorsing sanctions against Iran and wealth redistributing, big-government Promise Zones initiatives on the other. He’s endorsed McConnell, who is being challenged by Tea Party-supported Matt Bevin. He and McConnell are essentially sharing staffs (something I told you about in December). McConnell, you may recall, has had some very unkind things to say about the Tea Party and is seen by the Tea Party as a statist Democrat appeaser all too willing to lie down at Senator Harry Reid’s feet.

Paul’s also been cozying up to Karl Rove, the architect of George W. Bush’s “compassionate conservativism,” which was a pretty face painted onto a fascist, big-government, nanny-state pig. Rove has declared it his mission to defeat Tea Party candidates.

Last September, Paul showed up at the Liberty Political Action Conference to make a short speech in which he told the audience that to be viable the Republican Party must reach out to young people and minorities. He then sailed out the door — skipping a speech by his father, former Congressman and Presidential candidate Ron Paul — to head to Mackinac Island, Mich., and a powwow with Rove and other Republican bigwigs who were vetting (i.e., selecting) potential Republican candidates. Among the bigwigs Rand Paul has recently consorted with are major funders of Rove’s American Crossroads super PAC and Rupert Murdoch, owner of FOX News and The Wall Street Journal.

Since his election, Paul has drifted so far away from the libertarianism of his father that he’s even earned the approval of former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger. In a libertarian hit piece published in The New York Times on Sunday, Paul made it quite clear he isn’t his father and that he is prepared to play the game.

Rand Paul is showing his true nature. He is no statesman like his father. He’s merely a politician.

Personal Liberty

Bob Livingston

founder of Personal Liberty Digest™, is an ultra-conservative American author and editor of The Bob Livingston Letter™, in circulation since 1969. Bob has devoted much of his life to research and the quest for truth on a variety of subjects. Bob specializes in health issues such as nutritional supplements and alternatives to drugs, as well as issues of privacy (both personal and financial), asset protection and the preservation of freedom.

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