Public, Private Educators Have Differing Views Of Obama

0 Shares
college0308_image

A majority of college presidents, except for those in for-profit higher education, say they plan to vote for President Barack Obama this fall, despite the fact that most believe he has failed to deliver on higher education promises.

According to a survey conducted by USA Today’s Inside Higher Ed, 65.1 percent of college presidents say they plan to cast a vote for Obama this fall. Support for the President was strongest in public higher education with 75 percent at public doctoral and master’s institutions, 85 percent at public baccalaureate institutions and 66 percent at community colleges. The lowest level of support was in for-profit higher education, where only 29 percent of presidents said they plan to vote for Obama.

Responding to whether Obama has “fulfilled the promise that many in higher education” saw for him four years ago, only 36 percent of presidents answered yes. The figure was lowest in the for-profit sector with only 18 percent believing so. Private colleges have clashed with the Obama Administration several times in recent years over stifling Department of Education mandates.

USA Today contends that heavy support for Obama among public college presidents stems from a lack of a pro-education agenda among the Republican candidates. Only 10 percent of all college presidents believed that the Republican candidates have offered a higher education vision. Though nearly half, 44 percent, of presidents at for profit institutions believe that the Republicans have offered pro-education policy.

Sam Rolley

Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After covering community news and politics, Rolley took a position at Personal Liberty Media Group where could better hone his focus on his true passions: national politics and liberty issues. In his daily columns and reports, Rolley works to help readers understand which lies are perpetuated by the mainstream media and to stay on top of issues ignored by more conventional media outlets.

Join the Discussion

Comment Policy: We encourage an open discussion with a wide range of viewpoints, even extreme ones, but we will not tolerate racism, profanity or slanderous comments toward the author(s) or comment participants. Make your case passionately, but civilly. Please don't stoop to name calling. We use filters for spam protection. If your comment does not appear, it is likely because it violates the above policy or contains links or language typical of spam. We reserve the right to remove comments at our discretion.