Prosthetic Leg Used To Trick Tracking Tag

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ROCHDALE, England, Aug. 29 (UPI) — A British security firm said it fired two employees who attached a tracking tag to a suspect’s prosthetic leg, allowing him to violate his curfew.

The firm, G4S, said the staff members were dismissed after they attached the tag to the false leg of Christopher Lowcock, 29, of Rochdale, England, who disguised the prosthetic leg by covering it in a bandage, The Guardian reported Monday.

G4S said the blunder allowed Lowcock to remove the leg and violate the curfew imposed while he faces drugs, driving and weapon charges.

The British Justice Ministry said protocols “were clearly not followed in this case and G4S have taken action against the staff involved.”

“Two thousand offenders are tagged every week and incidents like this are very rare,” a department spokesman said.

A G4S spokesman said the employees were fired.

The spokesman said the company tags 70,000 people a year for the Justice Ministry.

“Given the critical nature of this service we have very strict procedures in place which all of our staff must follow,” he said. “In this individual’s case, two employees failed to adhere to the correct procedures when installing the tag. Had they done so, they would have identified his prosthetic leg.”

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