President Approval Hits New Low While GOP Candidates Run Neck And Neck In Poll

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On Tuesday, a Rasmussen poll detailed a 56 percent disapproval rating for President Barack Obama, and a Gallup Poll released Monday showed that GOP candidates are on the minds of many voters looking forward to the 2012 election. The poll’s results show Mitt Romney leading Obama by 2 percentage points, 48 percent to 46 percent;  Rick Perry and Obama tied at 47 percent; and Obama edging out Ron Paul by 2 and Michele Bachmann by 4 points.

Gallup reports that Obama’s approval rating at this time is lower than that of any of the six re-elected incumbent Presidents since Dwight D. Eisenhower. The organization also says that approval ratings and poll standings could change drastically leading up to the election as Obama tries to make amends with voters who may feel disenfranchised and with the addition of candidates such as Sarah Palin, Rudy Giuliani or George Pataki.

The President faces the strongest resentment from the conservative right. But following recent budget battles and frustrations among young and minority voters over joblessness and higher costs of living, the President has seen once-wide approval gaps closing from within his own base. Obama still has a 55 percent approval rating among 18- to 29-year-olds, though his approval by this demographic is far from the 28 percentage points he held over John McCain in October of 2008. The President still holds favorability with Democrats and low-wage earners at 85 percent and 55 percent approval, respectively.

 

Sam Rolley

Staff writer Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After learning about many of the biases present in most modern newsrooms, Rolley became determined to find a position in journalism that would allow him to combat the unsavory image that the news industry has gained. He is dedicated to seeking the truth and exposing the lies disseminated by the mainstream media at the behest of their corporate masters, special interest groups and information gatekeepers.