Comments Subscribe to Personal Liberty News Feed Subscribe to Personal Liberty
 

Piriformis Syndrome Followup: Four Ways To Release The Lower Back

April 20, 2010 by  

Last week’s article on piriformis syndrome, Your Lower Back Pain Or Sciatica Might Actually Be Piriformis Syndrome, created quite a bit of interest from readers wanting to know more. Indeed, it seems many people who think they are suffering sciatica or other lower back pain ailments are actually feeling the side effects of a tightened piriformis muscle. And while many physicians are quick to throw drugs and surgery at such problems, many times the answer is as simple as releasing lower back muscular constriction, which is in large part due to piriformis syndrome.

Today’s article is a response to the many queries we received on this syndrome and exercises that will help. Below I would like to share with you four sets of therapeutic corrective exercises you can do on your own.

If you can manage to perform these three times per day, in just a few days you will begin to feel lasting relief. After just a few weeks the body will self-correct and imbalances in posture due to muscular-skeletal issues related to piriformis syndrome should be corrected. Let’s look at each exercise now.

1. Pelvic Tilting
Pelvic Tilting

The purpose of this exercise is to warm up the area of the lower back by bringing heat and blood into the lumbar and sacral areas. Begin by sitting on a firm chair, toward the front with feet planted firmly on the ground (fig. 1). Allow your body to slouch slowly by titling your pelvis forward. Allow around three seconds to tilt to full slouch then hold that position for three seconds (fig. 2). Next, tilt your pelvis backward, swaying your low back to lift your upper body upward. Allow three seconds to reach full height then hold that position for three seconds (fig. 3). Repeat this slouch-and-sway movement set continuously for a total of 30 repetitions.

2. Piriformis & Hip Flexor Stretches
Piriformis & Hip Flexor Stretches

This next set of stretches works on releasing tightness in the piriformis and gluteus muscles in an effort to release compression on the sciatic nerve. Begin by sitting on a firm chair, toward the front with feet planted firmly on the ground (fig. 4). Place the ankle of your right foot over the knee of your left foot. Many of you will have very tight hips and using your hands to hold the leg in place will help here (fig. 5). Allow your hips to relax in this position for 10 seconds before pulling your knee toward your chest with both hands (fig. 6). Hold this stretch position for 10 seconds then release the knee slowly to its former position. Next, press your right hand down on your right knee, holding for a count of 10 seconds (fig. 7). Release and relax for 10 seconds, then press again this time counter-pressing your right knee into your right palm for 10 seconds (fig. 8). Release the contraction and relax in position for 10 seconds. Lastly, rest your forearms on the thighs of their respective sides and bed forward from the waist (fig. 9). Hold the forward position for 10 seconds then slowly return to the starting position (fig. 4). Perform this sequence, slowly and steadily, for a total of three repetitions.

Remember to repeat with the opposite leg.

3. Balanced Squats
Balanced Squats

Now that the previous exercises have warmed up the body and loosened the hips, we can continue with these squats. Stand up straight with feet a shoulder’s-width apart, toes pointing forward and holding onto a steady chair or counter for balance (fig. 10). Slowly and steadily bend your knees and flex your hips to lower your buttocks toward the floor (fig. 11). It is important to keep your knees behind your toes while lowering for balance and also to avoid straining the knees (fig. 12). Hold the lowest position to can maintain without using the chair as a crutch (it is for balance, not resting on). Hold this lower position for five to 10 seconds (fig. 13), then slowly and steadily rise to the starting position (fig. 10). Relax in the upright position for 10 seconds then repeat the squat for a total of three to six times, as your ability allows.

4. Gravity Leg Hanging
Gravity Leg Hang

Now that the muscles and tendons are looser and blood is moving we can move on to the final “stretch” exercise in this series. Begin by lying on your left side close to the edge of the sofa, with a pillow under your head for support (fig. 14). Create an X-shape by reaching back with your right hand to grab the cushions (or bed sheets) for balance. Slowly slide your right leg off the sofa, stretching the quadratus lumboratum (fig. 15). Allow the leg to drop as it will—do not strain—and allow gravity to work. Because this is a “passive” stretch, the muscles in the lower back will release quickly as your body will sense little threat to the position. Hold for one minute before slowly returning to the starting posture. Next, lie with your back facing out, grabbing a cushion (or sheets) for balance (fig. 16). Slowly allow your right leg to slide backward off the sofa, stretching the psoas muscles to balance the frontal stretch (fig. 17). Again, allow gravity to do its things as you relax in this position for one minute. Do this only once then change sides and repeat with the left leg.

As a rule, even though pain is felt in a specific area or a diagnosis for something has been given; other areas are also responsible for the imbalance. With regard to sciatica and lower back pain, piriformis syndrome is often the likely candidate.

However, stretching only the piriformis muscles will not in itself be the answer to the problem. Other muscles like the tensor fascia latte, quadratus lumboratum, gluteus medius and maximus and the psoas also play a role in creating imbalances. While it is the piriformis muscle that compresses the sciatic nerve, it does not become tight or in spasm on its own. The other muscles must also be released from spasm and returned to normal resting position to allow the piriformis to also relax. By taking 10-15 minutes to do the above simple stretches at least once, but ideally three times per day, you will feel relief in no time; without drugs and without surgery.

— Dr. Mark Wiley

Jeffrey R. Matthews

Facebook Conversations

Join the Discussion:
View Comments to “Piriformis Syndrome Followup: Four Ways To Release The Lower Back”

Comment Policy: We encourage an open discussion with a wide range of viewpoints, even extreme ones, but we will not tolerate racism, profanity or slanderous comments toward the author(s) or comment participants. Make your case passionately, but civilly. Please don't stoop to name calling. We use filters for spam protection. If your comment does not appear, it is likely because it violates the above policy or contains links or language typical of spam. We reserve the right to remove comments at our discretion.

Is there news related to personal liberty happening in your area? Contact us at newstips@personalliberty.com

  • Jim H.

    I drive for a living and these exercises and stretches will be a big help. Thank you.

  • http://www.pureheartsinternational.com Geoff Pace

    My chiropractic kenesiologist employs these types of exercises and then more. Try this: Lie prone on the floor with your left leg pulled up beside you for 15 seconds and then do the same thing with the right. Your knees should touching the ground or pert near to it. The key is let it and don’t force it.

    Also, in that prone position, bring your left leg across your right leg which is pointed straight out on the floor. Gently push your left knee to the floor or as close as you can let it. Don’t force it, but think it down, as it were. Your muscles will relax enough to let it go further down than you think. Then do the same with the right leg.

  • Mike Rochelle

    I am a physical therapist for the past 30+ years, and I still don’t get this hype about the piriformis causing all these pbs. What I DO find is that EVERYONE who has back pain will have tenderness if you poke the piriformis muscle. Thats also true for the SIJ area. If one properly addresses the spinal issues, these soft tissue problems simply go away without ANY direct intervention.

    The streches for piriformis in my opinion, are not correct. It attaches to the sacrum and the greater trochanter. Look at the anataomy….to properly stretch it, one needs to flex the hip to 90 degrees, adduct toward the opposite hip, and internally rotate the hip. That will put in on full stretch. What you are showing is a capsule stretch a.k.a FABER stretch = flexion….abduction…. ext. rot of the hip.

    What I think your viewers who get relief are doing is simply modulating their proble by doing “something,” but not fixing the primary cause, which is usually spinal in origin. 85% of people will have trigger points in their buttocks. I find that changing their posture and restoring spinal mobility, esp. extension, relieves these problems without having to mess around with all the soft tissue referral tissues(ie piriformis, gluteals, etc).

    Everyone has a bias….massage therapist and muscles/soft tissue…chiropracters and subluxations….acupuncturists and blockage of Chi….surgeons and discs out of place. The trick is to see the body as a whole and not be sucked into ones’s training and filter what you see thru our bias. It is what it is, and there are BETTER ways to fix things that provide lasting improvements.

    • Debbie Stratford

      You can’t always address the spinal issues. I have bulges at L4/5 and at L5/S1 but there’s no impingement. I’ve had daily pain for nearly 4 years and the only time it doesn’t hurt is when I’m asleep. I’ve been rehab’d to death by chiropractors, physios and ostepaths. i’ve had ART and seen 3 neurologists and my MRI results would indicate that surgery wouldn’t necessarily provide any relief. I cant give up so am going to try these piriformis exercises as there’s got to be a solution out there somewhere. I don’t really get lower back pain but I have chronic pain in the butt, in my hamstring, down the right hand side of my shin and into my foot, exasperated by sitting. Anyone know of a chair/cushion that helps alleviate the symptoms and is a pillow advised between the knees in bed?

      • snax31

        Hi Debbie,
        Dont know if this thread is still going but i have just read your symptoms and can relate to them also. i went to a physio recently who told me to buy a tennis ball and sit on it with the ball in the middle of the butt cheek(which ever side the pain is in) gently roll on the ball with as much wieght as you can and when you find the sore spot concentrate on this, do this for a good few minutes then do the piriformis stretch, continue as often as needed this has worked really good for me. Hope this helps.

  • Mike Rochelle

    I am a physical therapist for the past 30+ years, and I still don’t get this hype about the piriformis causing all these pbs. What I DO find is that EVERYONE who has back pain will have tenderness if you poke the piriformis muscle. Thats also true for the SIJ area. If one properly addresses the spinal issues, these soft tissue problems simply go away without ANY direct intervention to the soft tissue.

    The stretches for piriformis in my opinion, are not correct. It attaches to the sacrum and the greater trochanter. Look at the anataomy….to properly stretch it, one needs to flex the hip to 90 degrees, adduct toward the opposite hip, and internally rotate the hip. That will put in on full stretch. What you are showing is a capsule stretch a.k.a FABER stretch = flexion….abduction…. ext. rot of the hip.

    What I think your viewers who get relief are doing is simply modulating their proble by doing “something,” but not fixing the primary cause, which is usually spinal in origin. 85% of people will have trigger points in their buttocks. I find that changing their posture and restoring spinal mobility, esp. extension, relieves these problems without having to mess around with all the soft tissue referral tissues(ie piriformis, gluteals, etc).

    Everyone has a bias….massage therapist and muscles/soft tissue…chiropracters and subluxations….acupuncturists and blockage of Chi….surgeons and discs out of place. The trick is to see the body as a whole and not be sucked into ones’s training and filter what you see thru our bias. It is what it is, and there are BETTER ways to fix things that provide lasting improvements.

    • Dr. Mark Wiley

      Mike, thank you for your spirited post. As you say, “everyone has a bias” based on their professional outlook. Clearly, yours is coming through here. Thank you for adding to the discussion. Several points, however, I will address.

      To be clear, I did not say that piriformis syndrome is the cause of every back issue, or that everyone who has back pain has a tight piriformis. I said “piriformis syndrome might be” the cause of some of the issues related to lower back pain. I am offering a suggestion of a possible cause which will not require drugs or surgery… and was clear in suggesting getting the appropriate manual orthopedic tests to see if it is an issue or not.

      You, however, have used the strongest language (and in caps for emphasis) that ALL people with back pain have a tender piriformis. This, I find untrue as a blanket statement. I have done thousands of treatments and worked closely with chiropractors treating the same patients back-to-back, and I would say that not even a majority of people who I have seen with back pain have tender piriformis. I also know that such “un-scientific” data collected in my own city is skewed. Perhaps the patients you have treated over 30 years in your town, all like to participate in the same sport or activity, like bowling, and thus you see a correlation between back pain and piriformis ALL the time?

      Speaking of spinal issues, what is the cause of the spinal issues? The spinal subluxations are due to posture. We agree. However, it is the stabalizing muscles that contract to keep a person from falling and maintain an upright posture. As such, I have seen patients with 40 chiropractic adjustments still uncorrected as the issue is the muscles not the spine. The spine is the symptom. The piriformis is one such muscle at play there.

      We do agree, however, that correcting seated posture is the larger sweeping answer to the issue. If people were able to do this, you would be out of business. Yet, 30 years + and you still treat people who sit wrong. Moreover, correcting posture in itself takes too long to release the muscles, as muscle memory has told the body to hold the incorrect posture thus maintaining the issue. Stretching and corrective treatments and/or exercises will relieve pain instantly and over time release the muscles. This, combined with posture, is the way toward “curing” the issue. Not doing nothing but sitting straight while suffering each day or running to a physician for pills and being told surgery is the answer.

      People need to know options for relief. They need to know they can do it on their own without, yes, even the need for a physical therapist such as yourself or an alternative medicine practitioner such as me. Everyone’s issues are unique, and blanket statements or dismissal of statements should not be made. They dash hope. I will end here by summarizing the original article, wherein I said lower back pain, hip pain and sciatica ‘may be caused by piriformis syndrome.’ To see if this syndrome is the cause, it is best to have manual orthopedic tests done by a personal trained in them, such as a DO, PT, Chiro, etc. If a shortened piriformis is the culprit, then try these stretches for relief before considering surgery or the continuation of drugs.

      Thank you again for your input.

  • Ann Byrne

    I’ve had back surgery, which corrected pain in back and legs, however, now after 5 yrs. I have problems with hips. E-rays showed no problems with hips and therapists have recommended similar exercises shown. Yes, they do help relieve the hip discomfort. I’ve incorporated your exercise 4 through 9 and found these very helpful.

  • Joy Sims

    I am a physical therapist and I have found both of these exercises extremely helpful in my patient base. The piriformis is often overlooked as a cause for sciatica. In approximately 20% of the population the sciatic nerve goes thru this muscle which increases the chances of problems. Great pictures – one works for the piriformis and the other is good stretch to hip capsule which has helped several hip pain patients.

  • Jana

    These exercises are great. I came up with one of them on my own trying to find relief in my left leg that seemed to stem from my hip. My mother has this problem and I thought it might be hereditary.
    I am implementing all of these stretches in to my daily routines. Seems like I spend more time stretching recently than exercising. Moan.

  • Mary

    I always have lower back pain. Hurts when I sit, stand, bend over, squatting or kneeling. I get pains that go down the back of both legs when I bend over,it feels like muscles are being stretched further then they should. When I walk up little hills or steps I have pain that goes down both legs. Sometimes from my lower back down the back of my legs to my knees my skin hurts so bad I can’t touch it. It hurts to sit or stand. My ankles and the top of my feet have started hurting so it is hard to walk because of that. Would any of this be related to Piriformis Syndrome? I go to a chiropractor but it never clears this up.Thank you

    • Dr. Mark Wiley

      Mary, I am sorry for your suffering. It sounds like sciatica with some peripheral neuropathy. If you feel a burning, itching sensation then it is most likely nerve pain (sciatica) as opposed to muscle pain. Though, as is the case with piriformis syndrome, the muscle contraction is the root cause of the nerve pain.

      My suggestion for you is to call around and find a practitioner that knows and utilizes manual orthopedic assessments. These non-invasive tests are simple and easy and can show where the muscle and/or skeletal imbalance is. From there, correction can be focused. Merely receiving chiropractic adjustments without addressing possible muscle issues will take quite a while before changes are felt and seen. Also, basic massage is not “strong” enough to correct the issues–a course of manual corrective therapy (physical therapy, tui na, muscle energy technique, Feldenkrais, Rolfing, etc) will be of more help.

      Don’t delay is calling the practitioners in your insurance network to find someone to do the assessments. If you do not find someone, then it is well advised to pay out-of-pocket for the single visit to have them done.

      Keep us posted!

  • Artist in Las Vegas

    Hi I’m 47 years old, overweight and have been diagnosed with Degenerative Disc Disease. I’m in pain constantly unless I arch my back in the direction of my face leaning toward my knees. (Slouching). Any position where I’m upright or leaning backward is excrutiating for me. If I were to do the couch excercise I would scream. Standing and sitting hurt unless I lean forward so that my weight is not crushing down on my discs. Is there any suggestion you might have for me other than losing weight, I’m working on that? I’m not currently under any doctor care nor medication aside from advil and extra Vitamin-D supplements for my joint pain. I don’t know how much longer I can bare the pain and it seems I’m getting worse with each year that slides by. Any info would be appreciated. Thank you in advance.

    • Dr. Mark Wiley

      I am very sorry to hear about your suffering. Yes, weight loss is a big issue for people with muscuo-skeletal pain. As I mentioned in the article, you should first have manual orthopedic tests performed to see where the issue is originating. It could be the piriformis, but it may not be. Without examining you personally, or you having been examined and telling me what was found… I am afraid I am unable to offer anything specific. Generally, however:

      1) apply heat to the area, if it feels better then continue with heat. 2) if heat makes it worse, then use cold for relief. 3) Only “stretch” as far as you can until you feel the “first sign” of a stretch. Hold in that position until the sensation disappears. Then slowly increase stretch until the first sign is felt again, repeat. Little by little, and with patience, results can be felt.

      Please do try to get manual orthopedic tests as soon as you can.

  • http://www.personalliberty.com/personal-liberty-articles/piriformis-syndrome-followup-four-ways-to-release-the-lowerback/ Jol

    Hi,

    I dont know if you still read these post but I, like millions, am suffering from sciatica. An MRI found a disc bulge at L4 L5 that was compressing and displacing my L5 nerve root on the left side of my body. I felt physio wasn’t working so I went to a chiropractor who muslce tested me and found that the piriformus muscle was tight also on my left side. I have bilateral pain though and I have had this pain for 2 months, virually no back pain, just severe leg pain. The problem is that one of this problems (bulge, muscle) has to dispear in order to find the true calprit of my pain, which is burning (until lower legs), numbness (to my feet) and tingling ever now and then. I have not read a single article that speaks to how long the piriformus muslce remains problematic for an individual. I am 24 and in good health (I have no bad health habits other than eating junk food, which I recently really cut back on). I guess any input into my situation would be appreciated as I cannot stand to be home ridden for any longer. Thank you!!!

  • Naomi

    Hi,
    I appreciate the suggestions and helpful demeanor you have. I am 31 and starting at 18yrs old, if I laid in bed a certain way I could feel my right hip lock up. I had to quickly jump out of bed and stand straight before it could finish locking. Became pregnant at 29yrs old and found this problem intensified greatly! The locking up part does not really hurt but if I try to move my hip it resists and gets painful and 100% restrictive. It made me feel paralyzed in my right hip. I easily got in the wrong position but it take so long for the issue to subside. My husband would even grab my leg and try to rotate it various ways to see if hip would unlock. Leg would rotate mostly fine to a limited degree tho. My husband had to let me put all my weight on him while he helped me out of bed and to the bathroom. If I was alone it took me about half an hour getting there via hopping on one leg and hanging onto furniture. If I had attempted to put any weight on my right foot during step then the leg would’ve collapsed. My OBgyn gave me pain patches which surprising seemed to help! She suggested I get an MRI after pregnancy in case the sciatic nerve was being compromised. After birth 10 months ago, the extreme issues went away immediately. My hip still locks up occasionally as it originally did, which is easily overcome. But now within the past 3 weeks I have been getting a sudden warm sensation in my right inner thigh. Initially I thought I spilled warm liquid on my pants, even though i was no where near liquid lol, but would see my pants were dry. After 4 continuous days I realized this was a pattern and I started worrying about blood clots and such. My reading has led me to the possibility of sciatic issues… And now after your article I’m wondering if it could be a piriformis muscle issue. I am not sure what type of doctor to see. Neurologist for potential sciatic issue? I love chiros but want to avoid it for now in case they will just think its spine issue when it could be muscle. Just trying to hone down what kind of doctor so I can get started on this. Thank you for any input :)

  • http://www.drmarkwiley.com Dr. Mark Wiley

    Hello, Naomi,

    Thank you for your question. I am sorry you have been suffering for so long. My guess is that, yes, it may be your piriformis, or perhaps gluteus muscles. I recommend sleeping on your back with a long rounded pillow under your knees to elevate them. This should take the strain off your lower back.

    If the pain patches help, then it is possible that your issue is due to muscle spasms, more than sciatica. And some spasms can compress the sciatic nerve and cause pain. The patches help because they promote blood circulation, and thus free movement of nutrients and oxygen in the muscles via the blood.

    You can use patches at night, and also some form of pain cream. Elevating your knees will help, as will stretching your hip flexors and piriformis (as shown in article). Pregnancy can make it worse due to the tilting of the hips for several months. These exercises in the article will also address this.

    Give these a try and see how you feel a a few weeks!

  • Clive Quinn

    Hi Dr Mark,
    Firstly thanks for the effort you have put into this site.
    I believe I have a chronic piriformis problem. Chronic as I have had the problem for about 7 months and at this stage I have tried almost everything to rid it but to avail.
    I am going to try the above stretches tonight but would like your opinion on my general history.
    Got this pain after a lot of running in 2011- back then wore the usual clunky running shoes. Since then changed to running barefoot/vibram five fingers in the hope that strengthening feet would help but no improvements. I go regularly for deep tissue massage/active release treatment but it never really resolves my problem. I sit all day in work. Obviously I move as much as I can but physio reckons this is probably the crux of my problems. Daily, I use a foam roller and do pigeon pose, theraband exercises and deep squatting etc. The pain I feel from time to time feels like nerve pain. It extends from piriformis to behind knee and sometimes I feel it on the ball of my foot. I have rested for a 2 month period but it didn’t help. Lying down I find it very sore to straighten my leg during a leg raise. It feels as if something is catching my hip. My physio in some way was able to isolate my piriformis and then I had no pain during a straight leg raise. Really I am confused. How do I rid this pain for good? I have tried accupuncture, slight relief but pain came back. Any ideas?
    Thanks in advance
    Clive

  • karen

    Hi Dr Mark,

    I have had lower back pain that would shoot down my leg for about 5 years now. It seems to continually get worse. It was only on my right, now it is on both sides. After a massage I was relieved to know it is my piriformis and not a disc issue. Still haven’t been able to get tested but piriformis stretches were helping for awhile.

    I tried the pelvic tilt while laying in bed last night and I was able to rest without the severe pain. Ever since the problem stated on the left I have woken up with a stiff lower back and excruciating pain shooting down my left leg. I still had this pain this morning, but I have a feeling after I start this program I will feel much better. I knew that there were probably other muscle imbalances that were contributing to the problem, but could never figure out how top correct them. This article is a blessing. I will post back after a days or a week of using these exercises. Thank you so much for the information.

  • Eric

    Hello Sir,
    I have had this pain in my buttocks for about 2 months now. Right before it started, I had suffered a knee injury during a Taekwondo traning session. It was determined to be a meniscus tear. As I was seeking treatment for that, I started noticing the pain which will go from my hips to my buttocks and my tights. I sought medical attention and was sent away with Ibuprofen and a muscle relaxant. I was told that it may likely be an issue with lumbar disk. I am growing concerned as the pain far from decreasing is getting worse. One peculiar thing is that the only time i can feel a relief is when I sit. If I lay down or stand, I feel like a spasm or contraction in the muscles in the buttocks area. Any ideas?
    Thanks
    Eric

  • Ana

    This past Sunday we got snow. Just a few inches and I made sure to go out there every few hours before it accumulated to push it away with the shovel. I hardly did any lifting with the shovel. Woke up Monday with a horrible pain in my right side – in my hip, ovary area, and buttock. Thought I might just be passing a kidney stone or maybe had an ovarian cysts. A few months ago I had an internal ultrasound because I kept getting bladder infections and the doctor ruled out cysts or any other problem with the ovary, nor did I have any kidney stones. Still, I thought, that was a few months ago and things can change. The best description of the pain is getting a sharp stitch in the side that usually goes away in a few minutes, but this one didn’t go away. It’s 4 days now. Anyway, tonight I came home from work as as I was getting out of my car felt as if something teared next to my spine and I felt a pop. I couldn’t stand up straight nor could I bend over or rotate my hips. Putting my right foot down was impossible. I don’t know how I made it in the house. I called my sister and at first she thought Sciatica and went on the web and described all the symptoms of Piriformis, which I think I have. I tried your exercises and have felt immediate relief and can now stand up straight and squat, though still having a problem bending over. Anyway, what I’d like to know is why, when doing the crossed knee exercise (Piriformis & Hip Flexor Stretches) does it hurt more on the opposite side (left) than where I actually hurting on my right? I am having such a hard time trying to get my left leg to lift yet have no problem with the right leg in the area where I actually have all the pain. Is this normal? I would go to the emergency room but I’ve gone to doctors for back pain before and they rarely could do anything to give immediate relief so I don’t want to waste my time or theirs. Any infor would be appreciated. Thanks.

  • mia

    Hello, i think I may have developed piriformis syndrome a few weeks ago. I have been having troubles finding a position to sleep in that doesn’t cause me any pain, and that also doesn’t make it so I’m in excrutiating pain in the mornings after waking up. Could you please give me a few suggestions?

    Thank-you,

    Mia

Bottom
close[X]

Sign Up For Personal Liberty Digest™!

PL Badge

Welcome to PersonalLiberty.com,
America's #1 Source for Libertarian News!

To join our group of freedom-loving individuals and to get alerts as well as late-breaking conservative news from Personal Liberty Digest™...

Privacy PolicyYou can opt out at any time. We protect your information like a mother hen. We will not sell or rent your email address to anyone for any reason.