Pelosi Says There’s Nothing Left In The Federal Budget To Cut

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House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) took to the small screen over the weekend to bolster President Barack Obama’s argument that Congress must raise the Federal debt limit, telling a CNN host in a nonsensical interview that government has already slashed as much pork from its $4 trillion annual budget as is humanly possible.

Saying that House Republicans are “legislative arsonists” hell-bent on destroying the government’s role in education, research and development, Pelosi told CNN’s Candy Crowley “there’s no more cuts to make.”

Because the cupboard is bare. There’s no more cuts to make. It’s really important that people understand that. We all want to reduce the deficit. …You cannot have any more cuts just for the sake of cuts. Right now you’re taking trophies.

On Friday, House Republicans ushered through a continuing resolution to temporarily fund the government without funding the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, setting the stage for what could be a monumental battle this week between Senate conservatives — however many of them there truly are — and Senate progressives representing both parties.

The Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) is set to begin selling coverage through State-run healthcare exchanges in one week, although the functionality of the new exchanges continues to be stripped in order for the plan’s political supporters to claim the new healthcare marketplaces are being deployed without a hiccup.

Meanwhile, Pelosi’s claim that all the fat’s been trimmed from government looks remarkably silly.

Ben Bullard

Reconciling the concept of individual sovereignty with conscientious participation in the modern American political process is a continuing preoccupation for staff writer Ben Bullard. A former community newspaper writer, Bullard has closely observed the manner in which well-meaning small-town politicians and policy makers often accept, unthinkingly, their increasingly marginal role in shaping the quality of their own lives, as well as those of the people whom they serve. He argues that American public policy is plagued by inscrutable and corrupt motives on a national scale, a fundamental problem which individuals, families and communities must strive to solve. This, he argues, can be achieved only as Americans rediscover the principal role each citizen plays in enriching the welfare of our Republic.