Pakistan Views U.S. As World Bully

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As Pakistani officials warn Washington not to again breach the country’s borders in search of Islamic extremists, public opinion in the country has condemned the United States for the increase in suicide bombings since the beginning of the War on Terror.

The Washington Post reports that since Islamabad partnered with Washington in its relentless Mideast search for terrorists, there have been 335 suicide bombings in the country. Prior to the partnership, only one had been reported.

Many Pakistanis believe that since their government has opted to join the U.S. in fighting terror, it has split the country and destabilized the region.

“I have become so unsafe that sometimes I think I should have my family leave Pakistan,” said Hamid Mir, explaining the view of many Pakistanis. “Why is that? It is because of the American policies in Pakistan.”

According to the Pew Research Center, 63 percent of Pakistanis believe that the U.S. violated their sovereignty when military units invaded the country in search of Osama bin Laden and only 14 percent believe his death was a good thing.

The Pakistani Newspaper reported on Tuesday that the country’s Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani has warned Washington that continued accusations of his country playing a double game in the war on terrorists only risked further fanning anti-Americanism in Pakistan. He said any unilateral military action by the U.S. to hunt down the Haqqani network inside Pakistan would be a violation of his country’s sovereignty.

 

 

 

Sam Rolley

Staff writer Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After learning about many of the biases present in most modern newsrooms, Rolley became determined to find a position in journalism that would allow him to combat the unsavory image that the news industry has gained. He is dedicated to seeking the truth and exposing the lies disseminated by the mainstream media at the behest of their corporate masters, special interest groups and information gatekeepers.