Obamacare Has Little Appeal For The Uninsured

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Personal Liberty Poll

Exercise your right to vote.

Few uninsured Americans believe Obamacare is a worthy solution for their healthcare coverage needs. And only a quarter of them even know when the government expects them to sign up for health insurance, despite massive advertising campaigns that feature irresponsible idiots attempting to make Obamacare look cool as they go about their vapid lives.

The results of the latest Kaiser Family Foundation monthly tracking survey reveal an ongoing combination of ignorance, indifference and mild revulsion toward Obamacare among the uninsured.

Perhaps the key takeaway is that only 22 percent of uninsured Americans hold a favorable opinion of the healthcare law, while 56 percent hold an unfavorable view. Yet the negativity hasn’t managed to reach the level of a critical consensus demanding that the Affordable Care Act should be repealed.

From the poll summary:

Overall public opinion on the ACA in February looks much like it has since last November, with nearly half (47 percent) having an unfavorable view of the law and just over a third (35 percent) viewing it favorably. A plurality of the public (44 percent) say their impression of the law is based mostly on what they’ve seen in the media, while smaller shares say it’s based on their own experience (23 percent) or what they’ve heard from friends and family (18 percent).

… When it comes to next steps on the law, a majority say it should be kept in place, including 48 percent who want Congress to work to improve it and 8 percent who say it should be kept as is. Fewer say Congress should repeal the law and replace it with a Republican-sponsored alternative (12 percent) or repeal it and not replace it (19 percent).

… Last month’s tracking poll found a negative shift in opinion of the ACA among those who are currently uninsured, and that trend continues in February, with 56 percent of the uninsured having an unfavorable opinion of the law and 22 percent a favorable one.

Among those who don’t have insurance, there’s an ocean of indifference. Half of the uninsured surveyed said they don’t know enough about Obamacare to know how the law will affect them. Thirty-seven percent admitted to knowing “only a little” about the glitch-plagued Obamacare online exchanges. And 26 percent said they know “nothing.” Only 24 percent said they know the Federal deadline for signing up. (It’s March 31.)

Kaiser Family Foundation monthly tracking survey

According to the monthly tracking poll, public opinion toward Obamacare among both insured and uninsured Americans  veered into negative territory in November 2012 and, with minor fluctuations, has trended downward ever since. It now stands at 47 percent unfavorable, 35 percent unfavorable and 18 percent who say they don’t know or don’t wish to weigh in.

Perceptions of the Affordable Care Act have been trending negative among people without health insurance since February. Tuesday’s poll found that 56 percent now view the law unfavorably, while 22 percent view it favorably.

Note from the Editor:
As you’ve just read, the Obamacare abomination doesn’t bode well for anyone. But if you know how to navigate the system you can still control your own healthcare—as every American should! My trusted friend and medical insider, Dr. Michael Cutler, and I have written a concise guide to help you do just that. I urge you… Click here for your free copy.

Ben Bullard

Reconciling the concept of individual sovereignty with conscientious participation in the modern American political process is a continuing preoccupation for staff writer Ben Bullard. A former community newspaper writer, Bullard has closely observed the manner in which well-meaning small-town politicians and policy makers often accept, unthinkingly, their increasingly marginal role in shaping the quality of their own lives, as well as those of the people whom they serve. He argues that American public policy is plagued by inscrutable and corrupt motives on a national scale, a fundamental problem which individuals, families and communities must strive to solve. This, he argues, can be achieved only as Americans rediscover the principal role each citizen plays in enriching the welfare of our Republic.

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