Not Worth A Continental

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The Continental Congress was struggling to find funds and provisions for the Revolutionary forces when it decided to issue its own currency. On June 22, 1776, it issued $2 million in paper money. The currency featured the likeness of Revolutionary soldiers and carried the inscription, “The United Colonies.”

The “Continentals,” as the bills were known, were not backed by gold or any other assets. Merchants distrusted their value and demanded more and more of them for the same amount of goods. General George Washington complained that, “A wagonload of currency will hardly purchase a wagonload of provisions.”

By the end of the war the new currency was virtually worthless. The bills were ultimately redeemed by the new United States government at 1/100th of their face value. Because of this experience, the phrase “not worth a Continental” became a way to describe something that was virtually worthless.

The lesson also convinced our Founding Fathers to insist that any currency issued by the U.S. government be fully redeemable in gold or silvera requirement that became part of our Constitution and was honored for the next 100 years. Today, of course, our currency is only backed by “the full faith and credit of the United States,” which some cynics (this writer included) say explains why the value of the dollar continues to fall.

—Chip Wood

Chip Wood

is the geopolitical editor of PersonalLiberty.com. He is the founder of Soundview Publications, in Atlanta, where he was also the host of an award-winning radio talk show for many years. He was the publisher of several bestselling books, including Crisis Investing by Doug Casey, None Dare Call It Conspiracy by Gary Allen and Larry Abraham and The War on Gold by Anthony Sutton. Chip is well known on the investment conference circuit where he has served as Master of Ceremonies for FreedomFest, The New Orleans Investment Conference, Sovereign Society, and The Atlanta Investment Conference.

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