No Budget, No Pay

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A bill gaining bipartisan support on and off of Capitol Hill sends a pretty clear message to Congress: Fail to do your job, and we aren’t going to pay you.

Representative Jim Cooper (D-Tenn.) and Senator Dean Heller (R-Nev.) introduced identical “No Budget, No Pay” bills in the House and Senate in December that are continuing to gain co-sponsors and endorsements. Cooper’s bill currently has the support of 34 Representatives equally divided by party and Heller’s has six co-sponsors in the Senate, only one of whom is a Democrat, according to The Washington Times.

If “No Budget, No Pay” became law, the stakes would be high for American legislators. In the past six decades, Congress has managed to pass a budget successfully only four times.

“If this body can’t find a way to do what we have been sent here to do by the American people, which is to cut spending and reduce our nation’s outrageous $15 trillion deficit, then we don’t deserve to get paid,” Representative Kurt Schrader (D-Ore.) said of the proposed legislation.

The measure has scored endorsements from the taxpayer-watchdog group Council for Citizens Against Government Waste, the free-market organization Americans for Prosperity and the centrist group No Labels.

Sam Rolley

Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After covering community news and politics, Rolley took a position at Personal Liberty Media Group where could better hone his focus on his true passions: national politics and liberty issues. In his daily columns and reports, Rolley works to help readers understand which lies are perpetuated by the mainstream media and to stay on top of issues ignored by more conventional media outlets.

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