NHTSA Wants To Make Road Rules Without Public Input

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The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, responsible for a number of major rules that affect American commuters on a daily basis, is looking to grant itself authority to rush rules into law without the traditional public comment period.

NHTSA officials have floated a proposal that would give the agency “direct final rulemaking” authority over new regulations which carry the weight of law if bureaucrats deem the proposals “non-controversial.”

“NHTSA is proposing to use the direct final rulemaking process when the action to be taken is not anticipated to generate adverse comment, and therefore, providing notice and opportunity for comment would not be necessary,” the agency’s proposed rule states. “NHTSA believes this procedural option would expedite the issuance of, and thereby save time and agency resources on, rules that are not controversial.”

The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers questioned the proposal, citing the decrease in transparency it could cause and noting that what NHTSA thinks is a routine regulation, others could consider controversial.

Sam Rolley

Staff writer Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After learning about many of the biases present in most modern newsrooms, Rolley became determined to find a position in journalism that would allow him to combat the unsavory image that the news industry has gained. He is dedicated to seeking the truth and exposing the lies disseminated by the mainstream media at the behest of their corporate masters, special interest groups and information gatekeepers.

  • independent thinker

    “NHTSA is proposing to use the direct final rulemaking process when the action to be taken is not anticipated to generate adverse comment,…”
    I am not aware of any proposal by the feds or even state and local government that does not encounter “adverse comment”. I recognize that there are a few times the adverse comments are bordering on the ridiculous but that is something that should be determined in the public forum not by some nameless government official.