NASA data proves global warming computer models wrong

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NASA satellite data from the years 2000 through 2011 show the Earth’s atmosphere releasing much more heat than computer models predicted, casting doubt on timetables proposed by global warming alarmists.

A new study reported in the peer-reviewed journal Remote Sensing examines satellite data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which show that, from the years 2000 through 2011, the Earth’s atmosphere released much more heat than previously predicted by computer models.

“The study indicates far less future global warming will occur than United Nations computer models have predicted, and supports prior studies indicating increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide trap far less heat than alarmists have claimed,” read an article for Forbes.

“The satellite observations suggest there is much more energy lost to space during and after warming than the climate models show,” said study co-author Dr. Roy Spencer, a principal research scientist at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), in a UAH press release. “There is a huge discrepancy between the data and the forecasts that is especially big over the oceans.”

“At the peak, satellites show energy being lost while climate models show energy still being gained,” Spencer said.

While this does not necessarily disprove all global warming theories, it does display some glaring flaws in the computer models used to support the agendas of climate change extremists.

“Applied to long-term climate change, the research might indicate that the climate is less sensitive to warming due to increased carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere than climate modelers have theorized,” the press release read.

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