Massive Storm Possible On East Coast

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Preppers in the Northeast should prepare for some harrowing weather next week as what is being dubbed as a “perfect storm” is predicted by forecasters and could affect people from North Carolina to Nova Scotia.

“It is likely that significant impacts will be felt over portions of the U.S. East Coast through the weekend and into early next week,” the National Hurricane Center said.

On Thursday, Hurricane Sandy battered Cuba before taking a turn that could lead it right up the East Coast. The hurricane could track north just in time not only to cause heavy rains but also to meet a cold weather front, which would make for a potential Hurricane/winter weather hybrid event that could cause up to $1 billion in damage, forecasters say.

Some meteorologists are predicting a mix of steady gale-force winds, heavy rain, flooding and possible snow starting Sunday and continuing past Halloween on Wednesday for people in the eastern part of the United States.

“It’s going to be a high-impact event,” said Bob Oravec, a lead forecaster with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Hydro-Meteorological Prediction Center in College Park, Md.

“It has the potential to be a very significant storm with respect to coastal flooding, depending on exactly where it comes in. Power outages are definitely a big threat,” he said.

Officials say that if the storm makes landfall as expected on the Northeastern coast, it has the potential to grow into a storm that will “go down in history books.”

Sam Rolley

Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After covering community news and politics, Rolley took a position at Personal Liberty Media Group where could better hone his focus on his true passions: national politics and liberty issues. In his daily columns and reports, Rolley works to help readers understand which lies are perpetuated by the mainstream media and to stay on top of issues ignored by more conventional media outlets.