Massachusetts School Mimics Welfare State By Leveling Playing Field For Kids

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Schools aiming to prepare kids for life in entitlement-drunk America might want to start emulating Ipswich Middle School in Massachusetts.

According to FOX News, the school’s principal canceled this year’s Honors Night, an annual even recognizing the achievements of its hardworking and high-performing students.

The reason? It could lead to hurt feelings. The last thing kids who haven’t excelled want to see is kids who did excel being honored for it.

“The Honors Night, which can be a great sense of pride for the recipients’ families, can also be devastating to a child who has worked extremely hard in a difficult class but who, despite growth, has not been able to maintain a high grade point average,” explained principal David Fabrizio.

That sort of regressive compassion should serve the lowest common denominator among the schools’ student body well into adulthood, as long as America’s expanding safety net keeps snatching away what’s left of the incentive for its citizens to attain individual success.

Personal Liberty

Ben Bullard

Reconciling the concept of individual sovereignty with conscientious participation in the modern American political process is a continuing preoccupation for staff writer Ben Bullard. A former community newspaper writer, Bullard has closely observed the manner in which well-meaning small-town politicians and policy makers often accept, unthinkingly, their increasingly marginal role in shaping the quality of their own lives, as well as those of the people whom they serve. He argues that American public policy is plagued by inscrutable and corrupt motives on a national scale, a fundamental problem which individuals, families and communities must strive to solve. This, he argues, can be achieved only as Americans rediscover the principal role each citizen plays in enriching the welfare of our Republic.

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