Maryland Governor Hopes The Feds Will Spare Illegals From His Hateful Rural Constituents

1.3K Shares
martin o'malley

Wherever you may live in the U.S., do you feel that your Governor tries to represent the interests of all the people, diverse as the demographics of your State may be? If your Governor has plans to continue a political career, either by running for re-election or by seeking a Federal office, do you expect the Governor’s office to at least pay lip service to the interests of all your State’s people for as long as he or she is the Governor — or to write off a chunk of constituents as so much political dross by freely insulting them with deceitful, polarizing and false generalizations?

If you live in Maryland, you probably already know where this is going.

On Tuesday, news reports revealed that Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley, a Democrat who has vocally supported the Administration of President Barack Obama’s attempt to accommodate unprecedented numbers of illegal immigrant children in local facilities nationwide, himself urged the White House not to bring any of those same illegals into Maryland.

Specifically, O’Malley told White House adviser Cecilia Munoz last week, “Please don’t send these kids into western Maryland” — a reference to the Obama Administration’s considered plan to establish housing at a vacant Army Reserves facility in the city of Westminster (pop. 18,500), less than an hour north of Baltimore.

That may sound hypocritical on the surface — and O’Malley took some heat for the discrepancy between his stated position and his specific request to keep the kids away from his State — but apparently O’Malley was only looking out for the illegal immigrants’ well-being.

“I suggested to them that the location still under consideration in Westminster might not be the most inviting environment for the kids,” O’Malley told The Washington Post.

Why? The Post explained:

… O’Malley said he raised concerns about the proposed shelter in Westminster, a town of about 18,600 that’s about 35 miles northwest of Baltimore in Carroll County, a deeply conservative stronghold in this mostly Democratic state. Last year county leaders voted to make English their official language, despite protests that such an action was unwelcoming to immigrants.

… O’Malley said that his concerns were confirmed over the weekend when graffiti appeared on the empty military center: “No illeagles here. No undocumented Democrats.” The Maryland State Police are investigating the message as a hate crime.

Graffiti whose message essentially endorses Federal law and contains a politically partisan connotation hardly sounds like a “hate” crime. Property crime, sure. Besides, stories and stories could be written about all that’s wrong with the government’s “hate crime” designation.

At any rate, O’Malley’s name is often mentioned in discussions of potential Democratic Presidential contenders for 2016. We’ve seen enough of the effects of the Obama Administration’s divisive, “us-versus-them” rhetoric — rhetoric that glibly and knowingly draws lines between what the Administration perceives as good Americans and bad ones — to know the Nation needs to run as far and as fast as possible from anyone who demonstrates a propensity to continue that culturally balkanizing trend.

Ben Bullard

Reconciling the concept of individual sovereignty with conscientious participation in the modern American political process is a continuing preoccupation for staff writer Ben Bullard. A former community newspaper writer, Bullard has closely observed the manner in which well-meaning small-town politicians and policy makers often accept, unthinkingly, their increasingly marginal role in shaping the quality of their own lives, as well as those of the people whom they serve. He argues that American public policy is plagued by inscrutable and corrupt motives on a national scale, a fundamental problem which individuals, families and communities must strive to solve. This, he argues, can be achieved only as Americans rediscover the principal role each citizen plays in enriching the welfare of our Republic.

Join the Discussion

Comment Policy: We encourage an open discussion with a wide range of viewpoints, even extreme ones, but we will not tolerate racism, profanity or slanderous comments toward the author(s) or comment participants. Make your case passionately, but civilly. Please don't stoop to name calling. We use filters for spam protection. If your comment does not appear, it is likely because it violates the above policy or contains links or language typical of spam. We reserve the right to remove comments at our discretion.