Make Your Own First-Aid Medical Kit

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A standard first-aid kit is very important for emergencies. You must keep this kit accessible so you can get to it easily.

To make a first-aid kit, collect the items in the following list from around your home and purchase any of those items that you don’t have. As always, you should tailor this kit to fit the needs of your family.

Assemble them into a small suitcase or other container. Ideally, it should be waterproof. Keep all items in sealable bags to keep moisture out. Once it’s complete, store it in an easily accessible area of your home or garage. You should also make a smaller first-aid kit to put into your 72-hour kit.

The following list is a suggestion for what to store in your homemade medical kit: Add anything extra that your family needs. If you have a small child or baby, include the following baby items: Diapers, diaper rash ointment, and anything else a child would need for a medical emergency.

  • Cold Medicine.                                          
  • Ibuprofen.
  • Acetaminophen (Include baby dosages if applicable).
  • Aspirin.
  • Antacid.
  • Syrup of ipecac.
  • Diarrhea remedy.
  • Asthma inhaler (if needed).
  • Cough medication.
  • Antibiotic (if possible).
  • Antibiotic ointment.
  • Antibacterial wipes.
  • Baby wipes.
  • Bandages, all sizes (100 count).
  • Instant cold and hot packs.
  • Sun screen/block.
  • Lip balm or lip medication.
  • Triangular bandages.
  • Assorted gauze pads.
  • Sterile gauze.
  • First aid tape.
  • Elastic wrap or compression bandages (2 or more).
  • Butterfly closures.
  • Cotton balls and swabs.
  • Small scissors.
  • Thermometer.
  • Sanitary napkins.          
  • Disposable diapers.
  • Tweezers.
  • Small Splints — Popsicle sticks or tongue depressors.
  • Needle and thread.
  • Waterproof matches.
  • Plastic spoons.
  • Safety pins
  • Small notebook with pens.
  • Multi-purpose knife
  • Flashlight (with batteries).
  • Can opener (if needed).
  • Blanket — lightweight
  • Space blanket.
  • Essential personal medications.

No first aid or 72-hour kit is complete without ION. ION is a water treatment that kills bacteria on contact. It has an indefinite shelf life and eight drops will treat eight ounces of drinking water. If you get stranded in your car and can only find snow, pond, lake or river water to drink, ION will make it safe.

But it has other uses besides water treatment. ION also kills bacteria on wounds, cuts, and scrapes. ION can also be taken internally to help the body recover from the flu.

One bottle of ION will treat 110 gallons of stored water. It is great for use in water storage barrels. It can be used wherever the food or water is questionable. It will keep the water safe for five years.

Ion (Stabilized Oxygen) and premade medical kits can be purchased here.

Personal Medications
It’s very important that you include personal medications in your medical kit as well as your 72-hour kit. If you have to evacuate quickly and don’t have your mandatory medication, it could mean life or death. Most people cannot go more than three days without their medication.

Talk to your doctor and explain that you need an emergency supply of medication and keep it with your 72-hour kit or medical kit. Some medications expire within a few months so they need to be rotated.  Painkillers such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen and aspirin and powdered antibiotics are good to have on hand.

Cleaning Products And Soaps
Keep these items in a separate 5-gallon bucket that you could grab and go if necessary.

  • Disinfectants and bleach.
  • Washboard and tub.
  • Laundry soap.
  • Emergency clothesline or rack.
  • Hand soap and antibacterial soap.
  • Paper towels or hand towels.
  • Toothbrush and toothpaste.
  • Extra water for washing hands and clothes.

Bathroom Sanitation
A 5-gallon bucket can be used as a toilet. You can purchase bucket liners or use small garbage bags as liners. The Luggable Loo emergency toilet has a screw-on lid that fits over the bucket and has a toilet seat on top of it. If you don’t want to make your own sanitation kit you can purchase one here.

To make your own sanitation kit you will need to assemble the following items:

  • Five gallon bucket.
  • Toilet seat lid (screw on or snap on type).
  • Plastic garbage bags to fit the 5-gallon bucket with ties.
  • Toilet paper.
  • Baby wipes.
  • Anti-bacterial wipes.
  • Personal hygiene and feminine products.
  • Small fold-up shovel.

Outdoor Outhouse
What would you do if there was a natural disaster and the water was shut off to your house. How would you flush the toilets? How would you bathe? It would be like camping in your back yard.

If you live in an area where you have a little extra space on your property, an outhouse can be constructed by digging a hole about three feet deep. Put over the hole a wooden box with a toilet seat-shaped hole cut out of the top. Build a small tool shed-type enclosure around it. Be sure to vent it.

An alternative is to construct a makeshift room built like a tent with a curtain hung around it for privacy. To eliminate smells and toxic human waste I recommend a product called BIO-CLEAN. This dramatically reduces odor and flies. Cleaning and disposal of the pit becomes much easier and more sanitary.

BIO-CLEAN is a blend of bacteria and enzymes. The bacteria are natural, not genetically-engineered. The enzyme concentration is the most powerful on the market. Bio-Clean is non-poisonous. It creates no heat or fumes and there is no boiling involved. It does not attack live tissue or inorganic materials, only organic wastes like human excrement, grease, hair, food particles, paper and cotton. This makes BIO-CLEAN safe for people, plumbing and the environment.

BIO-CLEAN changes the waste particles into water, carbon dioxide and mineral ash which become harmless in the outhouse, cesspool, pit, or waste system. These elements are then available to use as compost in the garden.

Personal Liberty

Peggy Layton

a home economist and licensed nutritionist, holds a B.S. in Home Economics Education with a minor in Food Science and Nutrition from Brigham Young University. Peggy lives in Manti, Utah with her husband Scott. Together they have raised seven children. Peggy owns and operates two businesses: One called "The Therapy Center", where she is a licensed massage therapist and hypnotherapist, and the other an online cookbook and preparedness products business. She is nationally known for publishing a series of seven books on the subject of food storage and also lectures and teaches seminars about preparedness and using food storage products. Peggy practices what she preaches, has no debt, grows a huge garden, lives off the land, raises chickens, bottles and dehydrates food and has time left over to operate her businesses. To check out Peggy's cookbooks and self sufficiency products go to her website www.peggylayton.com. To get a free sample of three different storable meals that have a 15-year shelf life go here.

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