M.O. Fleeing Barack’s Mess, Bernanke Leaves The Faucet On, Brains Like Fewer Calories, FEMA Leans On ‘Waffle House Index’ To Triage Disaster, DOJ Went After Conservative Reporter’s Parents: Tuesday Morning News Roundup 5-7-2013

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Here is a collection of some of the stories that Personal Liberty staffers will be keeping an eye on throughout the day. Click the links for the full stories.

  • First lady Michelle Obama is evidently tiring of the scandal swirling around her husband — so she appears to be planning to get out of the White House, and stay out, all summer long on an extended vacation at Martha’s Vineyard.

 

  • Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke is set to tell Congress today that the U.S. economy is too weak to handle a bump in interest rates or a slowdown in the money-printing, dollar-debasing scheme known as quantitative easing.

 

  • A study reveals that reducing calories prevents the loss of brain cells and cognitive decline through aging, and can help avoid degenerative mental conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease.

 

  • Craig Fugate, the corpulent director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, apparently likes the Waffle House well enough to take policy cues from the 24-hour restaurant chain. In triaging the scale of the disaster left in the wake of a tornado, he’s come up with something called the “Waffle House Index.”

 

  • The U.S. Justice Department is already stammering excuses for the illegal manner in which it gained access to the communications of conservative-leaning news reporters. But targeting their parents? That’s what allegedly happened to FOX News reporter James Rosen, whose parents’ phone records appear to be part of a broad DOJ investigative dragnet.

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Ben Bullard

Reconciling the concept of individual sovereignty with conscientious participation in the modern American political process is a continuing preoccupation for staff writer Ben Bullard. A former community newspaper writer, Bullard has closely observed the manner in which well-meaning small-town politicians and policy makers often accept, unthinkingly, their increasingly marginal role in shaping the quality of their own lives, as well as those of the people whom they serve. He argues that American public policy is plagued by inscrutable and corrupt motives on a national scale, a fundamental problem which individuals, families and communities must strive to solve. This, he argues, can be achieved only as Americans rediscover the principal role each citizen plays in enriching the welfare of our Republic.