Local Cops See Ammo Shortage While Congress Asks Big Sis: Bullets? Why You Need Those Stinkin’ Bullets?

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Maybe something will give soon. More and more members of Congress are beginning to dial up the heat on the Department of Homeland Security to divulge its justification for taking steps to amass an alleged 20 years’ worth of ammunition.

Infowars reported Friday that Representative Doug LaMalfa (R-Calif.) and 14 other House members have written DHS to determine what all these bullets are really for, and whether the big buy is part of an effort to artificially choke supply and drive up prices.

The letter comes on the heels of bipartisan clamoring for DHS head Janet “Big Sis” Napolitano to speak plainly on the topic — something she so far hasn’t done.

The Congressmen should be helped along by emerging reports that city and county cops across the United States are having to ration bullets, be put on waiting lists or even barter with other agencies in order to avoid running out of ammunition for both training and patrol use.

CNS News compiles several such reports in the past two months, from Texas to Montana to Tennessee to Wisconsin. One Ohio city is applying for an ammo grant.

As you likely know, DHS isn’t military; it’s an agency ostensibly preoccupied with domestic safety. A February analysis determined the United States would have had to extend the most heated portion of its Iraq war for an additional 24 years to expend the amount of ammo our supposed Homeland protectors have snatched up.

Personal Liberty

Ben Bullard

Reconciling the concept of individual sovereignty with conscientious participation in the modern American political process is a continuing preoccupation for staff writer Ben Bullard. A former community newspaper writer, Bullard has closely observed the manner in which well-meaning small-town politicians and policy makers often accept, unthinkingly, their increasingly marginal role in shaping the quality of their own lives, as well as those of the people whom they serve. He argues that American public policy is plagued by inscrutable and corrupt motives on a national scale, a fundamental problem which individuals, families and communities must strive to solve. This, he argues, can be achieved only as Americans rediscover the principal role each citizen plays in enriching the welfare of our Republic.

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