Knocked Out: Is America Becoming South Africa?

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“They’re right. All those people who say it’s our job to just sit and watch people die. They’re right.” — Spoken by Taylor Kitsch in the role of Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Kevin Carter in “The Bang Bang Club,” described by IMDB as “a drama based on the true-life experiences of four combat photographers capturing the final days of apartheid in South Africa”

There is a new game spreading across urban America, my friends, and you cannot buy it from Nintendo. It’s called the “Knockout Game.” Caution: If you lose, it could cost you your life. But don’t expect the liberal media to report it. You see, it is perpetrated by blacks against whites. That kind of news simply doesn’t wash, especially under the Presidency of Barack Obama.

The game is not like chess. It comes down to human mechanics. Can a young man walk up on an unsuspecting stranger and knock him out cold with a single punch? It helps if the victim is old and an invalid. I am not sure whether there are bonus points for knocking out frail women over 70, but who knows?

Across New York, New Jersey and Philadelphia, black teens alone or in packs are being captured on video walking up to strangers on the street and sucker punching them as hard as they can. Robbery is not the motive — only a “clean” (think of the irony in that word) “knockout” of strangers whose only offence has been to walk down the street. The game has also been coined by inner city youths as “polar bear hunting” — a name that in itself indicates the color of the victims. The Knockout Game is becoming more popular and has spread to Illinois, Missouri and Massachusetts. Soon to be in a city near you?

News Blackout By The Liberal Media

I have not heard of such random and overt race violence since I spent time in South Africa at the very moment Nelson Mandela was being released from prison and the black majority was expecting him — a man who would not renounce violence — to ascend to the presidency of South Africa.

Fast-forward 23 years. In Brooklyn, the spread of gang violence has been captured over and over again. At least it has been recognized by Councilman David Greenfield, who said the victims rage in age between 12 and 78 years old. You don’t have to be an expert to figure that these teens prey upon people the way hyenas stalk the sick and weak gazelle.

At least New York is trying to protect its people with increased police presence and a new bill that would allow Knockout Game players to face up to 25 years in prison.

Yet don’t expect the mainstream media to report a word of it. They are too busy reporting on the latest happenings regarding George Zimmerman or any incident of white-on-black violence. News anchors like Anderson Cooper at CNN and others like Krystal Ball and Al Sharpton at MSNBC will never report such a story. Yet a few brave souls are willing to stand up to the liberals and their black agenda. That small group includes Greta Van Susteren, who wrote last week:

Do you know what is going on? That is young African-American teenagers viciously and gratuitously attacking a random victim, a teacher, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Now, this violent act is what the teens where this is happening laughingly call “The Knockout Game.”

I beg of Reverend Jesse Jackson, Reverend Al Sharpton and even President Obama to step up right now and speak out. Your silence will speak volumes, but your voice could make a big difference. Don’t wait. Be leaders, they need you. We need you.

Can Van Susteren expect honesty on what is happening regarding race violence from Jackson, Sharpton or Obama — three men who seem more committed to stirring it up rather than reducing its incidence? Of course not. Jackson is becoming irrelevant, while Sharpton plays the fool each weekday during his hour-long rants on MSNBC that attack what he calls the “white establishment.”

The far greater and more sinister threat to race relations in America is being carried out by Obama. He inserts himself each time a wrong is done to a black by a white, but he remains stone silent regarding black-on-black and black-on-white violence. It is Obama’s reach, politics and personal grievances against white people that shape his Presidency and, thus, threaten our safety and liberty.

How can we be surprised? Obama’s hero is Mandela, a man who refused to renounce violence. I wrote about it in Obama Condemns Slavery, Then Celebrates The Life Of Terrorist Nelson Mandela. I spoke of my month spent traveling throughout South Africa in 1990. That was the same month Mandela was waiting his release from prison and was on his meteoric rise to the presidency of South Africa. It was a time when black resentments planted by Mandela’s Marxist African National Congress (ANC) had taken root, and there was murderous black violence against other blacks and large numbers of whites.

One night, my uncle and I strayed a few blocks past our hotel in downtown Johannesburg. Two policemen with submachine guns came upon us in disbelief and asked what the heck we were doing outside of our hotel at night. They said there was a good chance that such a stroll could end our lives, and then they escorted us back to our hotel. I remember that — as an American who had lived only in Spokane, Wash., and in Calgary, Canada — I was completely shaken.

Today, South Africa is one of the most violent countries in the world. Instead of the black utopia that Mandela promised, 50 South Africans are murdered every day. Whites live and work behind barricaded walls protected by armed guards.

Protecting Yourself In Obama’s America

After I returned from South Africa, I took up self-defense training and boxing. (Today, it would be called mixed martial arts.) I had an instructor, Matt David, who was a black belt in karate and a former California Golden Gloves Heavyweight Champion. David was an imposing man who more than once accidentally knocked me out cold while sparring, and he could throw me across the judo mats like a rag doll (not an easy feat because in those days I weighed more than 200 pounds). You might think a man like David and the presence he carried would be all the protection he needed. David didn’t think so. When outside his gym, he always carried his Glock on his hip.

I cannot say what David needed to feel safe. That was his personal decision and his 2nd Amendment right. What I can say is that many parts of America are far more dangerous than what Spokane was 20 years ago. And while I have never met a more capable person of defending himself without a firearm than David, his No. 1 rule for personal safety was not to carry a sidearm. It was to not be in a place where you need one.

What is tragic is that in America there is getting to be fewer and fewer such places, and we can’t even count on our leaders or their mainstream media to inform us where it is safe and where it is not safe. To do that would state the obvious: that America is becoming a less safe place by the month just as it was in South Africa two decades ago.

Yours in good times and bad,

–John Myers

P.S.: The South African Airways 747 we flew to South Africa was completely empty. On our return flight to London, every seat was taken, mostly by whites who were permanently leaving the country.

P.S.S.: The experience I had in South Africa and the violent meltdown are captured in the book The Bang Bang Club by Greg Marinovich and Joao Silva and in the 2010 movie of the same name.

John Myers

is editor of Myers’ Energy and Gold Report. The son of C.V. Myers, the original publisher of Oilweek Magazine, John has worked with two of the world’s largest investment publishers, Phillips and Agora. He was the original editor for Outstanding Investments and has more than 20 years experience as an investment writer. John is a graduate of the University of Calgary. He has worked for Prudential Securities in Spokane, Wash., as a registered investment advisor. His office location in Calgary, Alberta, is just minutes away from the headquarters of some of the biggest players in today’s energy markets. This gives him personal access to everyone from oil CEOs to roughnecks, where he learns secrets from oil insiders he passes on to his subscribers. Plus, during his years in Spokane he cultivated a network of relationships with mining insiders in Idaho, Oregon and Washington.

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