Justice Scalia: Hopes The Living Constitution Will Die

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Speaking to the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday, Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia said that government gridlock is good, good Federal judges are lacking and that the Constitution is being abused by those in power.

Scalia said that when he hears Americans complaining about political gridlock hampering the government’s ability to get things accomplished, he thinks they should be reminded that the system is designed to create discussion. He said if Americans understood the Constitution they would “learn to love the separation of powers, which means learning to love gridlock, which the framers believed would be the main protection of minorities.”

The longest-serving justice told the committee that the U.S. war on drugs has made Federal crimes out of too many routine drug cases. In turn, that created a need for more judges– judges that he believes are not as good as judges before them because they are no longer part of an elite group.

The justice also criticized those who try to interpret the Constitution as a living document.  He has long advocated the interpretation of the Constitution for what it meant at its time of ratification.

“I’m hoping that the ‘living Constitution’ will die,” Scalia told Senator Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) during the address.

Sam Rolley

Staff writer Sam Rolley began a career in journalism working for a small town newspaper while seeking a B.A. in English. After learning about many of the biases present in most modern newsrooms, Rolley became determined to find a position in journalism that would allow him to combat the unsavory image that the news industry has gained. He is dedicated to seeking the truth and exposing the lies disseminated by the mainstream media at the behest of their corporate masters, special interest groups and information gatekeepers.