Justice Department Nominee Refuses To Disclose Clients

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This type of relationship between the Justice Department and corporate America could be an issue due to the clients that Horowitz had worked for, as conflicts of interest could prevent antitrust suits from happening.Michael E. Horowitz, President Barack Obama’s nominee for the role of the Justice Department watchdog, has filed paperwork to keep the identity of more than 10 of his clients a secret, The Washington Times reported.

The nominee, who has earned more than $4 million in the past year as an attorney for companies such as Pfizer, Dow Chemical and Cablevision, has found a narrow exception in the rules that require nominees to disclose their clients and customers, according to the newspaper.

Horowitz took advantage of the exception that allows attorney-client confidentiality to trump the many government disclosure mandates that exist, and the nominee would have to police himself if any potential conflicts arose if he was given the position, reported the Times.

This type of relationship between the Justice Department and corporate America could be an issue due to the clients that Horowitz had worked for, as conflicts of interest could prevent antitrust suits from happening.

The recent Justice Department antitrust suit filed against AT&T and T-Mobile was a surprise to these corporations, but the diligence of the government entity prevented the formation of an unhealthy monopoly, according to Apple Insider.

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