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Justice Delayed

September 22, 2011 by  

Justice Delayed

By the time you read this, cop-killer Troy Anthony Davis — whose street name in Savannah, Ga., was “Rough as Hell” — will be sporting a toe tag… or not, depending on whether President Obama decides to grossly overstep his authority and commute the death penalty to which Davis was sentenced more than 20 years ago. Davis has been dodging the needle through every legal avenue available since the day he was convicted of murdering Savannah police officer Mark MacPhail. Davis is entirely unremarkable: He’s just another thug who committed an unconscionable crime and got caught and convicted. But the objections to putting Davis down like a rabid dog have almost nothing to do with Davis.

Some of the people vocally opposing the execution of Davis stand on religious and moral ground. They simply don’t believe the death penalty is an acceptable form of justice. There are good people who oppose capital punishment and will do so vocally no matter who is strapped to the gurney. For my part, I remain convinced that some people — Davis among them — simply don’t deserve to continue consuming our oxygen.

But even a casual glance at the mob shrieking for clemency for Davis reveals that many of Davis’ supporters back him for a more pedestrian reason. According to one such supporter, Alicia Blakely: “We as African Americans have never gotten a fair shake.” Begging Blakely’s pardon, but Davis has not only gotten a fair shake, he has been given about a dozen appeals over two decades since he murdered MacPhail. I’d say Davis has received a surplus of fair shakes.

The case for clemency for Davis has been fanned by a fairly impressive campaign of disinformation and distortion. At the fore of this campaign is the modern incarnation of a once-great civil rights organization: the NAACP.  The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People professes to focus on the struggle of black people in America. Davis was convicted by a jury of his peers, the majority of whom were black. So I suppose the NAACP is not focusing on the struggle of those particular black people. The NAACP has proffered a litany of excuses for Davis, none of which hold up to real scrutiny. On its website under the headline “Clemency Denied: Last Chance For Troy,” the NAACP points to claims that seven of the nine witnesses who identified Davis as the killer have recanted their testimony. What the NAACP doesn’t mention is that all of those witnesses testified in court two years after giving their statements. Not one wavered until years after Davis’s conviction — and only after considerable pressure from Davis supporters and defense team. The NAACP website also ignores a pile of material evidence and the endless stream of failed and rejected appeals. It also ignores Officer Mark MacPhail, the victim (but he’s white, so screw him).

The NAACP was formed out of righteous indignation. But that era has been relegated to the history books – or it would be, if chapters hadn’t been replaced by “Heather has two mommies, three daddies and a disabled goldfish, all of whom are better people than you are — unless you’re black, Hispanic, Muslim or some combination of the three.” With the Jim Crow era dead and gone, the NAACP has only two choices: disband or find something else about which it can be indignant. So the NAACP has evolved from righteously indignant to professionally indignant. And an indignant black community gives parasites like NAACP President and CEO Ben Jealous a paycheck to rally indignation over the long-overdue execution of dangerous creatures like Davis. In a sense, we should be glad that Jealous has a job. Without it, he’d be a creepy fat guy in the two-sizes-too-small “I Am Troy Davis” T-shirt shrieking on the corner. (Note to Mr. Jealous: either wear the extra-large, or start doing sit-ups.)

Under normal circumstances, the kind of racism peddled by hucksters like Jealous and the modern NAACP is annoying, perhaps outrageous. But Davis murdered another human being in cold blood. While some might object to capital punishment, Davis earned his sentence. The idea that the justice system has maintained a massive conspiracy over more than two decades just to put this dog down is ludicrous: Davis isn’t that important. The debate over capital punishment may be worth continuing. The debate over Troy Davis is decidedly not.

–Ben Crystal

Ben Crystal

is a 1993 graduate of Davidson College and has burned the better part of the last two decades getting over the damage done by modern-day higher education. He now lives in Savannah, Ga., where he has hosted an award-winning radio talk show and been featured as a political analyst for television. Currently a principal at Saltymoss Productions—a media company specializing in concept television and campaign production, speechwriting and media strategy—Ben has written numerous articles on the subjects of municipal authoritarianism, the economic fallacy of sin taxes and analyses of congressional abuses of power.

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  • 101stRECON68

    As much as we would like to believe that race is no longer an issue in America, it seems it is the blacks that can’t seem to let go of the race issue. It doesn’t matter if a criminal is guilty or not, it doesn’t matter if a candidate for office is qualified or not. All that matters is if they are black. Who are the racists now?

    • Patriot II

      Recon;

      Come on now, if we eliminated the “Race Issue” some people would have no Purpose, we can’t go having that now!

      • Old Henry

        PatriotII:

        No purpose – and no job!

      • Void1972

        Patriot,
        The only way to eliminate racisim, is to eliminate the race. This is what the obamnation plans to do.
        He is giving our hard earned money to “his” people by the trillions. Like they havent taken enough of our money.

        • Rick Beatty

          Well put !

    • j henry hodges

      Sounds as if you might be the “who” in your question…I support the death penalty…but there sure seemed to be reasonable doubt in this case.

      • Michael

        How strange the bevy of courts who heard and reheard the evidence saw no problems and like Ben said, this dog was finally put down.

        • independant thinker

          If the only courts involved were the state courts then a person might have a case for commuting his sentance or freeing him and I emphasize MIGHT. However, the feds also got involved and his conviction has been upheld by them (and the feds are not known for supporting Southern courts) so one can reasonably come to the conclusion that the guy is guilty.

        • Old Henry

          Yeh Michael, he needs a fair “shake” – or more aptly put, a fair jerk at the end of a rope. To hell with that needle in his paw sh*t.

          • Robert Smith

            Speaking of paws…

            Did you hear about the dog that walked into a bar and asked, “Who shot my paw?”

            Rob

      • DonnieB

        Where is your evidence of reasonable doubt? Many appeals over 20 years and the majority of the original jury was black. Just what ‘evidence’ are you looking at?

      • 45caliber

        reasonable doubt?

        There were 32 witnesses to the crime. He and another were giving a vagrant a hard time at a Burger King. The cop spotted it and shouted. Davis turned, in the presence of dozens of witnesses and shot the cop. Then he walked over to the fallen cop and shot him again. Several people who knew him personally were standing less than five feet from him at the time. He ran and they caught him later. The pistol was hidden and no one has found it – the defense lawyers insist that he shouldn’t have been tried without it. The defense called only a handfull of witnesses. Several juries have heard the arguments and all found him guilty. Two witnesses have since recanted but their recanted stories don’t hang together while their first story did. Not only that, but this piece of trash also shot two other people at a party earlier. The only “recanting” the girlfriend of one did was that she died and can no longer testify against him.

        You need to do a little research on this before you start insisting there is some “reasonable doubt”. There is absolutely no doubt at all that he did it.

        • TOCB

          It is strange that the only people who know anything about these 32 wittnesses are Republicans. You would have us believe you have more information about the case than the former FBI Chief William Sessions who said there is substantial doubt? Really?

          • Violet Angel

            All the witnesses are Republican – Really??? When did this country become so divided?

          • 45caliber

            TOCB:

            Read up on the case. It is available.

        • DaveH
        • DaveH

          Look at this sweet innocent face. Does that look like the face of a rabid killer?
          http://www.11alive.com/rss/article/204549/3/Troy-Davis-execution-set-for-Sept-21
          I’m kidding, but seriously what would we rather have, an innocent man being executed, or a guilty man going free? I choose the latter over the travesty of the former.
          How many stories have we heard of men being proven innocent of decades earlier crimes, just to be exonerated later by DNA evidence and still not being released from prison? I’ve heard several. Government does not like to fess up to mistakes. It’s the nature of the beast.

          • http://al@bellaproducts.com al metcalf

            No DNA needed in this crime, many, many eye witnesses and many of his friends too. Wake up, another criminal gone, thank god.

          • http://?? Joe H.

            DaveH,
            What about the guilty man that gets freed and FOUR orFIVE innocent people end up dead when he re-offends?? I think that everyone that puts up your arguement should have to inform the parents or family of each and every victim of a repeat criminal.

        • DaveH
      • http://gunner689 gunner689

        why, because the liberal media told you so ? ever heard of jury nullification or gang threats to witnesses to get them to recant testimony ? Obviousl there was enough substantial evidence against this cop killer to fry him or they wouldn’t have. this isn’t the 1920′s. If anyone questions the use of the death penalty do yourself a favor and read “Born to Lose” by Jim Hollack. Some people are just plane psycopaths and need to be put down like a mad dog.

      • wandamurline

        Georgia put down a black animal who killed a white police officer and who had been on appeal after appeal for about 17 years, and his last one was not approved by the US Supreme Court…so he was put out of his misery. Texas just put down a white animal who dragged a black man on a road and killed him…but it did not take us 17 years to do what needed to be done. Killers are killers, it makes no difference what color of skin they have…they are animals who need to be put down.

        • BigGeezer

          Except with black America… you noticed not one black person protesting in front of the WhiteHouse was in favor of stopping BOTH executions last night… Lawrence Brewer was executed in Texas but no-one said anything because he was white… racism is alive and well and it showed up again with Al Sharpton’s folk.

      • http://www.colony14.net The Obama Timeline author

        There is no “reasonable doubt.” Reports that 7 of 9 witnesses recanted their testimony is a lie. There were not 9 witnesses to the crime; there were 34. The shooting took place in public view in the parking lot of a Burger King. Witnesses included three members of the U.S Air Force. The witnesses who changed their stories were pressured to do so. You will have to ask them why they gave in. Unless one believes that the 27 others who did not change their story were lying, justice was served.

        The jury consisted of 7 blacks and 5 whites. In less than two hours they returned a guilty verdict.

        The case was reviewed perhaps a dozen times over the last 20 years. Unless one believes that all those courts and judges were incompetent, justice was served.

        • JeffH

          :) End of story…guilty as charged…!

        • JeffH

          The Obama Timeline author…I’ve read some of your book and it contains much of what I have uncovered through my research over the years about Obama and more…very detailed.

          I suggest others check out your website.
          http://www.colony14.net/

        • 45caliber

          You are correct. And one of the witnesses who “recanted” actually died.

        • DaveH

          I don’t know if your story is true or false, Author. Can you back that up with any references, or do you just expect us to vote “guilty” because you say so?

        • DaveH

          While many of you people are giving “thumbs up” to the Government Gladiators, there is this kind of stuff going on. No jury, no judge, just executioners from above:
          http://www.collateralmurder.com/
          And the executioners haven’t been charged.

          What a world.

  • http://Personalliberty Tony

    To everyone here:
    Although Troy Davis was executed, there was alot of questionable evidence used in this case. Also, 7 of the nine jurors stated the evidence was at best flimsy to at worst false against Troy Davis.
    Therefore, an innocent man might of been executed. I for the death penalty but lets make sure justice is served which i doubt in this case. Thanks!!

    • Brad

      Tony,

      The sad part we the people have not seen all the evidence in this case and we won’t, so who’s to say he is innosent or guilty. We have heard and seen very little coming from the prosecution and defence, and where was the appeal and any possible DNA evidence linking Mr. Davis to the crime? These are questions the court system has taken into consideration and time again the courts have come back with the same conclusion, Mr. Davis was guilty and the system sentenced him to an appropriate sentance.

      • Robert Smith

        There is a difference between “guilty” and dead.

        Several folks opposed the execution but I didn’t hear anyone say he should get out of jail. Among them: Desmond Tutu, former President Jimmy Carter, Pope Benedict XVI, former FBI Director William Sessions, former Georgia Republican congressman Bob Barr, and former Georgia Supreme Court Chief Justice Norman Fletcher.

        Rob

        • 45caliber

          You are right. They don’t say he was innocent. But I’m a person who supports the death penalty since it is the only thing that insures these characters won’t kill someone else. So I don’t care if people like Jimmy Carter don’t want to execute him.

          • http://?? Joe H.

            45caliber,
            the energydepartment started with Carter, that doesn’t make me real confident of his judgement!!

    • Greg T

      The problem with many that support Davis to me is there credibility. NAACP would not support Davis if he was white. The others do not support the death penalty regardless of guilt. Eye witnesses changing their story are by their very admission, not trustworthy (trust what I say now not then).

      The US and GA Supreme Courts looked at the case and did not intervene when the courts are so willing to do so.

      The court of public opinion is so distorted that even on this website people can’t even agree if 9-11 was an inside job. There is no DNA exoneration that continues to release many other prisoners from jail. How in the world can we determine if someone killed another human being over 20 years ago with so many political powerful influences rallying behind the person convicted of the crime?

      • death to non belivers

        if you haven’t read the trails transcript, you cannot comment that this person is innocent. death penalties are not handed out as a whim. there were many eye witnwsses, including frieds of this person who said he shot the officer, walked back to the officer and shot him a few more times. if all those witness’s were high on lsd at that time, their statements could be unreliable. in 21 years, how many courts have reviewed his trial and sentence ? i guess we hve to wait for the unbiased naacp to review the trial, to be sure this isn’t an innocent man about to be executed. has anyone asked the family of Officer MacPhail what they think of the naacp actions ? ask me, it is a disgraceful action, the same goes to the supporters of that cop killer in philadelphia pa. why have trials against black cop killers anymore ?

        • Greg T

          Death,

          If you are replying to my post, you totally missed my point.

    • Michael

      Those jurors voted to convict, so wonder why they considered the evidence flimsy? That holds no water what so ever.

    • 45caliber

      Tony:

      There is a problem with your story. There are 12 jurers – not 9.

      See my note above on the act. When 32 people insist there was no doubt of who he was – and some were friends of his – then I have no doubt either. The defense says there was no physical evidence but how much physical evidence can there be with a couple of bullets and a gun? He didn’t rape the cop so no DNA. Let’s get realistic.

      Don’t try to confuse the facts. At worst this is an open and shut case except for the people who want to eliminate the death penalty.

      • http://?? Joe H.

        45caliber,
        I blame a lot of this stuff on the idiot tube!! Shows like CSI and other crime scene shows have made the norma jurror think there should be indisputable proof in every case. sometimes there isn’t. The law says “beyond a REASONABLE doubt” Not beyond ALL doubt!!

    • http://www.colony14.net The Obama Timeline author

      “Questionable evidence?” And what might that have been? There were 34 witnesses! (The 7 who changed their stories were pressured to do so and the inconsistencies in the revised stories makes them suspect.)

      The thug was wearing a Batman T-shirt and killed a cop as people watched. He ran away and was caught – after he disposed of the gun. That the weapon was never found is not “questionable evidence,” it is merely a lack of one piece of evidence. I think the fact that 34 people saw the guy shoot the cop is evidence enough. That the media for some reason claims there only 9 witnesses is shameful.

      The thug was treated more than fairly. He should have been executed years ago.

  • Monte

    You would be hard pressed to find a more pathetic organization than the NAACP. They peddle racial disharmony for profit, all the while chanting equality. Hypocrisy for profit would be closer to the truth. In my small town, the sheriff arrested a group of drug dealers, one of which was the son of the local head of the NAACP. Outraged, the mother notified the national office. In short time, they strode into town, huffing and puffing. For months they tried every conceivable angle to have the sheriff thrown out of office. Since the sheriff was only doing his job, you have to wonder: who would support such a band of nutcases?

    • James

      Monte I agree and I’m black.

      • WickedPickle

        @James.. “Most of us hard working educated black prefer to be called American”.

        So be it, James.. So be it..

        • KHM

          Wicked Pickle,
          Glad to hear you say that you are American(first)! While I just heard of this case recently, it seems as if Mr. Davis got his day in court and then some. His original trial was also by his peers, so assuming all the courts’ decisions were based on the evidence this American got justice and the punishment for his crime (whatever the race of perp or victim). End of story.

      • James

        For the record, I’m not the ‘james’ that wrote this. My comments are along constitutional and biblical lines.

  • Free Mind

    I’m with Tony. There was reasonable doubt. This is not justice, but what can you expect from a government who can’t do anything right?

    Now, let’s see how the cop in California, Ramos is judged for killing a homeless man.

    • Brad

      Free Mind,

      In my opinion, evidence doesn’t lie, people do to protect themselves. If this X-police officer is found guilty then he should pay the price. The old addage goes “don’t do the crime if you don’t want to do the time”.

      • Free Mind

        Brad, it’s my understanding that the evidence is circumstancial in the Troy Davis case. He should not be locked up, let alone killed for that.
        We all know that Justice in this country isn’t.

        • death to non belivers

          bullets and casings found at the crime scene happend to belong to the gun davis had with when he was arrested. i guess the circumstanses that davis had the gun and was a few miles from the murder makes that evividence very suspicious and shd have been discounted by the jury (which had 7 black/minority/african american/what ever they want to label themselvs today), on the jury that convicted in him 2 hours. keeping this murderer alive for 21 years, at tax payer expense, is a travesty.

          • James

            Most of us hard working educated black prefer to be called American.

        • ValDM

          Free Mind,
          So, being convicted by a jury of his peers (many of them black) & numerous appeals to various courts, which upheld this conviction is reasonable doubt in your mind? You show your true colors.

        • Brad

          Free Mind,

          And how many appeals did Mr. Davis have and every court sided with the evidence against Mr. Davis, you can’t dispute the evidence.

        • 45caliber

          Free Mind:

          You should read up on this case better. Circumstantial? Perhaps we have a different idea of what it means. When 32 eyewitnesses, some of whom knew him personally, all identify him as the killer, then I dont’ consider that as circumstantial.

  • Justice served

    http://savannahnow.com/column/2011-09-22/arcangeli-no-injustice-davis-case

    The facts need to be told. More of the media that fails to get the facts are part of the problem. The truth needs to be told.

  • Patriot II

    The Real Crime here is what all of this has cost the American Taxpayer!

  • s c

    So how many appeals were made over the years? How much money did lawyers get? Were Davis’ appeals based on sound legal points? Is ‘justice’ for sale and used to help fund groups like the ACLU?
    Did Davis commit more crimes while he was in prison? How much of the story has been withheld from the public?
    There are always many details that get left out of a story. In one like this, some people seem happy to forget about the victim. There are many instances in which it seems convicted murderers become ‘rock stars behind bars.’ Until I get more details, I’ll save my sympathy for the family of the police officer who was murdered.

    • 45caliber

      Sadly, we taxpayers pay for all his appeals. And most of the time for the trial itself. The lawyers know that the longer they can take to get to the execution date, the more money they will make. They don’t really care if he is innocent – they want the money.

      • Patriot II

        45caliber

        Hmmmm so who is the real culprit here stealing our money, could it be Lawers?, NO certainly not! OMG heaven forbid. I would like to see what the combined Attourney fees are on this, I’ll bet it is well into the Millions, and of course we are paying for most of it.

  • Justice served

    Do you think the media will correct their support for a cop killer?
    I don’t think so. http://fop9.net/markmacphail/debunkingthemyths.cfm

  • CP

    I personally believe that any time you rely totally on eyewitness testimony for a conviction, the death penalty should be off the table. A life spent in prison with no hope for parole is far harder to take than knowing you are going to be put to death, if you don’t die of other causes before hand. For those who holler it costs too much to hold someone for the rest of their life, count up all the appeals that were filed in this case, and remember, both sides of each appeal were paid for out of the same pocket. I will also say that if Mr. Anthony had not been convicted of killing a cop, more than likely the prosecution would have let go when witnesses started changing their stories.

    • 45caliber

      CP:

      When you are on death row, you have a cell to yourself. When you get life sentence, you share the cell or may even be placed in a bay with up to a hundred other prisoners.

      At any time, a violent man may be able to attack and kill another prisoner. Unfortunately, many do. To make things worse, the guards cannot carry any weapons in a prison. So they have no way to actually stop such an attack until enough show up from all over the prison to overpower him. And some of them might get killed too.

      I’d much rather terminate such a person than keep them alive for the rest of their lives and put everyone else in jeapardy. And don’t think the other prisoners don’t want the same thing! They don’t want to be around a dangerous prisoner.

    • independant thinker

      ” For those who holler it costs too much to hold someone for the rest of their life, count up all the appeals that were filed in this case, and remember, both sides of each appeal were paid for out of the same pocket.”

      We would still have to pay for all the appeals. Just because he got life without parol instead of death doesn’t mean there would not be as many if not more appeals.

  • aarus geron

    I’m very conservative. I favor the death penalty if appropriate. (By the way, some people sent to prison “without the possibility of parol” are currently on parol, so that’s one reason I favor the death penalty.) Nevertheless, the criminal court system needs a massive culture change. Prosecutors are apparently graded on their conviction rate. So that’s what motivates them. Unfortunately, the truth is not their concern. I say put a moratorium on the death penalty for 5 years and let’s change the culture. Is that possible?

    • bob wire

      Perhaps so. Due process is taking place, the system in place is working as designed. A quest for Justice.

      Crystal is just in a hurry, I’m left to believe makes political and racial hay in the delay suits him well. That’s right down his alley.

      It’s that liberal arts degree, he simply loves to create and manufacture.

      What I’m gathering, there were many improprieties during the conviction process of this man trial that has came to light.

      Let us allow the system and bright minds the time to address it.

      I do believe the pursuit of “fairness” is desirable endeavor and well worth the time.

      • Rose

        How much “time” do you need? 20 years isn’t enough time? Sheesh! If his appeals were also denied, he’s guilty!

        • bob wire

          Well, I can tell you are in a hurry, but this 20 years alone should tell everyone, something stinks. NO? Rose, this 20 years wasn’t the accused idea but the system in place. Sounds to me like, it’s his final lay down card.

          Why be opposed to him playing it if it’s with in the system reach for justice?

          I really haven’t follow this very closely but heard enough to see just cause for “doubt”.

          • S.C. Murf

            bobbie, you just see and hear what you want to see and hear. You know what I want to HEAR? For you to make that popping sound. OK? All those witnesses and it comes down to what bobbie sees and hears Get over yourself bobbie.

            up the hill
            airborne

    • http://Personalliberty Tony

      To aarus geron:
      I agree with you precisely. As stated in my first post on this subject, i’m for the death penalty 100%. Good example, that Texas case in Jasper, where an innocent man was dragged to death by a pick up truck and the suspect bragged about it, this is where the death penatly was justified. However, i re-emphasize, in the case of Troy Davis, there were so many holes that you can’t get a straight answer.
      Therefore, an appeal and re-trial was needed before one can come to an
      exact conclusion. Thanks!!
      P.S. It doesn’t matter if Troy Davis was non-white or white, justice needs to be served. This is no different with the Mumia Abdul Jamaal
      case in Penn. 30 yrs ago. I no fan of Mumia or what he stood for, yet, he was framed in the case of the death of that Philadelphia police officer. Thanks again!!

      • BigGeezer

        Tony; there were NO factual holes. Just evidence (matched shell casings from the earlier shooting where he admits guilt) and witnesses that confirmed this POS guilt… and of course the dishonesty of the anti-capital loonies and the bigoted media. Anyone who has researched this long and tedious trial and appeals knows he was guilty. He just turned into the real coward when he had to fry for his crime!

    • 45caliber

      aarus:

      A few prosecutors may match your description but most don’t. They want the violent people locked up and the good ones released. They look at the evidence and go from there. Perhaps one thing you should keep in mind – they see ALL the evidence, including much that is not necessarily allowed in court. For instance, this trash attacked severl other people at a party the night before this shooting – but he wasn’t tried for that. Yet it is evidence that shows that he is violent and should not be placed in the prison system.

  • eddie47d

    Some of you should have noticed that Ben did not make any attempt to take his hood off in writing this article. It should also be noted that he brings up the NAACP quite often in his bias. Fair,balanced or honest? Not a chance! He failed to mention that a few jury members also recanted or showed remorse for their guilty verdict besides those of the witnesses. At the police station the witnesses were shown a group of pictures and all had the same background EXCEPT the one of Troy Davis. His picture deliberately stood out and made it easy to pick. That is what the NAACP was challenging and rightfully did so. I will not dispute that Troy should be in prison but the evidence and police tactics should have kept him from receiving the death penalty.

    • bob wire

      too funny eddie! That was rich. He didn’t need to take his hood off, I knew it was him when it read like words from the “burning bush”. I almost took off my shoes!

    • Jibbs

      Visit a prison and ask each inmate if THEY are guilty. You might be suprised.

    • DonnieB

      You accuse the author of bias but you make no mention of the obvious bias of the NAACP. Maybe you have some bias of your own!

      • eddie47d

        Why would someone be biased against any organization who defends an innocent man. Wrong justice is no justice and I doubt if the victim would want that either.

        • http://?? Joe H.

          C F Murf,
          Here’s one you will probably never hear that pop from!! Just a loud TTTTHHHHHUUUUUMMMMP!!!! Just like a Hunts tomatoe!!!

    • Buster the Anatolian

      “If the only courts involved were the state courts then a person might have a case for commuting his sentance or freeing him and I emphasize MIGHT. However, the feds also got involved and his conviction has been upheld by them (and the feds are not known for supporting Southern courts) so one can reasonably come to the conclusion that the guy is guilty.”

      A quote from Independent Thinker that covers it rather well especially the part about the federal courts not being known for supporting the decisions of Southern courts.

  • death to non belivers

    troy davis would be set free if he says he has converted to a mulsim, and believes only in prayer and peace now, like all the othe muslims.

    • mark

      No, actually scores of African Americans who coverted to Islam are executed every year in our nation. Black Muslims have great success converting folks in prison. But they have zero success changing the sentences which prisoners already have.

      • 45caliber

        You are right. The Muslim faith is the fastest growing prison religion.

        Why? Because it preaches violence against anyone who disagrees with you.

  • Raggs

    Troy Davis obviously was not politically connect to the democrats if he had been he would still be alive… This is one case were the color of his skin did not help ( and thats a good thing ). But looking at his supporters the color of his skin was the only thing that they saw.

    • bob wire

      No, That’s what you saw Raggs. ~ You are YOU Raggs and can’t see for other people. You can only “see” for Raggs.

      I don’t know if it had anything to do with color or political affiliation or not. I’m not agreeing with you or disagreeing with you other then refusing to believe that you can see for “others”

      But I do know police should not show wittiness pictures of the defendant prior to a line up and this is but one of many “improprieties” that took place during the conviction process.

      As far as I’m concerned, he could be a green independent living on food stamps and driving a new Lincoln, it’s not relevant.

      • Raggs

        Than prove me wrong!!!… You can’t!

      • bob wire

        Prove you are right!

      • 45caliber

        bob:

        The police showed pictures to the witnesses? I think that is called “mug files”. Very commonly done.

        Incidently, one defense attorney challenged one of the witnesses in his identifcation of the criminal. The witness stated, “It’s hard to forget the face of someone who stands over a man on the ground and pumps bullets into him.”

        • http://?? Joe H.

          bobby,
          several of his FRIENDS that knew him identified him as the shooter!! They didn’t NEED mug shots!!

      • bob wire

        Well, it appears Justice has been done.

        http://www.wimp.com/secretsites/

  • TOCB

    Former Republican Congressman Bob Barr, Former FBI Chief William Sessions, The former warden at the prison where Davis was executed all thought there was too much doubt of Davis’ guilt for the execution to proceed. Prior to this murder, I was for the death penalty in certain cases. This murder has turned me completely against the death penalty in ALL cases as our so-callled justice system is apparently incapable of determining if a person is innocent or guilty of the crime for which they are being put to death for.

    • http://gunner689 gunner689

      Do yourself a favor and read “Born Loser” by Jim Hollack. Then think about your stand on the death penalty.

    • BigGeezer

      TOCB; do yourself and society a favor… not one of those guys stated that ‘they had the doubt’… it was to ascertain the facts through the appeal process. They were not standing up for this guy… they simply asked that due process was given in the appeals process. This is another lie that has been told so often that some believe it as fact. IT IS NOT!

  • Jibbs

    The bullet casings matched the pistol Davis had on his person and he was seen at the crime scene. Then he was found guilty by his peers.
    But now, 20 years later some of the jury members say they are unsure. I think they just feel bad that time ran out and the time to pay the piper has come due.

  • Harvey

    He confessed on his death gurney. He said “I did not have a gun”. The law is the same for all involved in the crime. The death penalty does prevent crimes. He will not kill again! Even in the Bible death penalties are ok. Thou shall not murder is not the same as executing those that commit murder.
    The NACCP is a communist organization that does more to hurt the black citizens of America than any other organization. They complain that tax cuts only help the rich. There is a little truth to this. About forty-eight percent of the peoe do pay any taxes. The other tax paying citizens pay for the up keep of the others. A tax cut can never help someone that do NOT pay taxes!

    • Monte

      “The NACCP is a communist organization ” You are so right. You’d be suprised to learn how many people are unaware of thie important fact. Everything they do is suspect.

    • http://Personalliberty Tony

      To Harvey:
      Look man, Naacp may have its’ flaws but it’s not a “communist”
      organization. That’s the equivalence of me saying The Tea Party is
      a Fascist, white supremacist-Klan organization. Please stick with the
      facts sir. Thanks!!

      • Monte

        You need to research the origins of this ‘great’ organization. You will be surprised.

  • Capitalist at Birth

    Obviously, most of the people posting here today, have not totally investigated the true facts in this sad story. I have done a little research, and there is no doubt he is guilty. At what cost do we put people to death? I believe the death penalty has led to a decline in the sanctity of life in this country. My evidence? Over 45M unborn children put to death. Contemplate that for awhile. I am opposed to the death penalty for Convicted Criminals and the defenseless.

    • http://pauljbosco.com Paul J. Bosco

      Hey, Capitalist–

      What are you trying to be? CONSISTENT?!

      The Catholic Church is against abortion, war and the Death Penalty. Do you think THEIR consistency gets them and plaudits?

      With so many persons on this forum unable to separate their values from their slogans, it’s nice to read a note from someone who can.

      –Paul J. Bosco
      Manhattan

    • BigGeezer

      hey Captialist… TOTALLY unrelated comparison… fetuses have done nothing. Murdering POS have!

      • Capitalist at Birth

        What is the financial cost of the never ending appeals compared to life in prison without the possibility parole. When you have found that it costs more to execute that it does to house and feed, you may become less vindictive.

        • Opal the Gem

          You still gonna hafta pay for the never ending appeals and in fact may have to pay for even more since the person will have more time to make them.

  • James

    What is missing, here, is any mention that the 7, out of 9, witnesses who testified against Troy Davis, had recanted their testimony. They said they were more influenced by prosecutorial pressure than evidence. It’s a known fact that this goes on, to improve their conviction record. A few years back, 13 of 28 death-row prisoners in Chicago were released from prison when DNA proved it was not their blood at the crime scene that convicted them. No new such evidence was available for Davis, and appellate courts, including the Supreme Court, will not reverse lower court decisions without it.

    • Capitalist at Birth

      There were 34 witnesses, and only two recanted their testimony, but not in a court of law. The defense refused to call these supposed re-canters when they had the chance.

      • eddie47d

        What case are you talking about? The Davis case had 9 visual witnesses and 7 recanted. Prosecutors in Colorado Springs 3 years ago said they had 250 witnesses in a murder case but only a couple of visual witnesses. The rest were police who arrived at the scene and forensic experts and any Court related official. It may mean something different in other jurisdictions.

        • JeffH

          eddie, they’re called “key witnesses”!

          He had all the chances in the world.

          The U.S. Supreme Court gave Troy Davis an unusual opportunity to prove his innocence in a lower court last year, though the high court itself did not hear the merits of the case. He has had ample time and opportunity to prove his innocence. Troy Davis’ best chance may have come last year, in a hearing ordered by the U.S. Supreme Court. It was the first time in 50 years that justices had considered a request to grant a new trial for a death row inmate. The high court set a tough standard for Davis to exonerate himself, ruling that his attorneys must “clearly establish” Davis’ innocence. After the hearing judge ruled in prosecutors’ favor, the justices didn’t take up the case.

          State and federal courts, however, have repeatedly upheld Davis’ conviction. One federal judge dismissed the evidence advanced by Davis’ lawyers as “largely smoke and mirrors.”

          Spencer Lawton, the district attorney who secured Davis’ conviction in 1991, said he was embarrassed for the judicial system — not because of the execution, but because it has taken so long to carry out.

          “What we have had is a manufactured appearance of doubt which has taken on the quality of legitimate doubt itself. And all of it is exquisitely unfair,” said Lawton, who retired as Chatham County’s head prosecutor in 2008. “The good news is we live in a civilized society where questions like this are decided based on fact in open and transparent courts of law, and not on street corners.”

  • Justice served

    I live in Savannah. We have a black Chief of Police, Black City Mayor (former Mayor was also black), black City Manager, black District of Attorney, half city council are black, half Judges are black, and Police force are mixed with whites, blacks and Hispanics. We are NOT racist. It doesn’t matter if a white person killed a black police officer, he would get the same if the evidence was the same. The juries were mixed and all heard the evidence. Three times his execution was stopped. Four Courts found him guilty. Troy Davis was given every opportunity to prove his innocence, he did not. He was a bad person before he killed Officer Mark MacPhail . The officer never took his gun out of his holster. Davis lied to the very end.
    His family started this movement to try and save his life by saying doubt but not telling the evidence against him.
    Now the people using the word racist are ruining this country.

  • chuckb

    we can also blame the bleeding heart liberals for a lot of this problem,
    they were the first to use the term racist and of course the blacks found a key for a lot of locks. this is instigated by the aclu and the splc. the education system also is to blame, instead of teaching people to stand up for themselves they found a tool in using racism to circumvent the educational system and getting some diplomas they didn’t deserve.
    this case is a prime example of what’s wrong with the judicial system.

  • SILVER FOX

    Let’s see now, he had a gun, he didn’t have a gun. The gun was found, it wasn’t found. You see, we have a dispute here and we are just thrashing this thing about. Based on several different things that have come to light, several jurors have publicly stated that if they knew then what they know now, they would not have voted to convict. There were nine witnesses in court. Seven have recanted their testimony. I have neither read nor heard of any other witnesses coming forward to state that Davis was the killer. What I have heard is that one woman fled Ga. because she knew who the real killer was and was threatened by him. As I say, “I heard.” I rmember seeing one official quoted in a death penalty case as stating something to the effect, “It’s not a lock that he’s guilty, but we have enough.” The measure is a “reasonable doubt, not “it’s enough.” By the way to Mrs. McPhail, the charged does not have to prove innocence. The state must prove guilt. When it becomes an issue ofguilty until proven innocent we are in deep dodo.

    • Justice served

      I’m not Mrs. McPhail. Don’t know the family.

    • 45caliber

      Silver Fox:

      There were 32 witnesses against him in court. Seven supposedly recanted but one of those died first. The stories of the rest can’t be reconciled although their stories as a witness did. So the gun wasn’t found. If the murder weapon was REQUIREd to get a conviction, you’d find a lot more criminals released. It isn’t hard to bury one or throw one in a river.

      I’ll stick with the original verdict.

  • Palin12

    Keep in mind, in most states killing a cop is a more egregious crime than killing a non-cop. Case in point, Mark David Chapman, John Lennon’s killer, was convicted of Second-degree murder, the highest offense in New York (at the time in 1980) for killing a non-police officer. No death penalty was allowed for second degree murder. This maggot is still alive and currently 15 years older than his victim lived to be.

    • 45caliber

      One reason that I believe in the death penalty. Actually it isn’t vengence I want to see – I simply want to get people who are willing to kill others out of society so we don’t have to worry about them.

  • Rebecca

    I am an advocate of the death penalty as it deters crime. (It keeps that particular individual from re offending). I am especially in favor of capitol punishment where cop killers are concerned as I am about to marry a cop. However, in this particular case (according to everything I have read) there is more than just a regular amount of reasonable doubt. Seven eye witnesses have recanted. No murder weapon was found. No lie detector tests were given….It looks like some of this would have been considered in the appellate court.

    • 45caliber

      Rebecca:

      It was all considered. That’s why they didn’t release him.

      Incidently, if you noticed, they weren’t asking for an innocent verdict. They were asking for a change to a life sentence. The people who seemed to be supporting him actually bellieved he was innocent too. And 7 of 32 witnesses – many of whom knew him – isn’t a lot of recanting, particularly when their original testimony matched but their recants didn’t.

    • http://?? Joe H.

      Rebecca,
      hate to burst your bubble, hon, but polygraphs are not admissable in most all court procedings! They CAN be beat!

      • Rebecca

        Joe,

        My fiance’, who is a detective just told me that! I wasn’t aware that it wasn’t admissable.

  • chvietvet

    The death penalty may be warranted in some circumstances, but not in the United States. With the most corrupt court system in the world and probably in human history, we cannot give our corrupt judges the power of life and death. I know because the government has sent me on a path leading to slow death through homelessness and starvation. My crime was serving honorably in combat during the Vietnam War. Many of my fellow veterans have already perished, as are those returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. I have survived because relatives have given me their financial support. The U.S. Department of Agriculture offered me $20,000 to withdraw from a federal selection because, as a veteran, I was blocking their hiring list for a poorly qualified non-veteran. After reporting the offer, I was fired and blacklisted. Department of Agriculture personnel phoned other prospective employers to make sure that I would never get another job. This matter has been brought before both federal and state courts, and the outsome has demonstrated how judges, who dodged the draft during their youth, lie and twist evidence to keep the matter from ever coming before a jury. It is clear to me why it is so easy for prosecutors send innocent persons to execution. In the present case, this may or may not be so. The courts cannot be trusted.

    • 45caliber

      Thanks for your service. I’m sorry to hear of the problems they have been giving you. Hopefully something will release for you.

    • Justice served

      I am so sorry you were treated badly. I think most of this country would agree with me on that. I personally want to thank you for your service.

    • Jeep

      chvietvet, first let me thank you for your service as well. And, I can only say in regard to your dealings with the govt, that when you dance with the devil…well, you’re bound to get burned.

      And, now for the but, it was not the govt directly that has caused the issues you are still dealing with today. You need to buck up soldier! The country, in general, was hostile to my brothers during that period in our history. And, I would agree that times were tough in the 70′s and 80′s. But, today there is no excuse. Homeless and starving vets are still responsible to seek help. And, brother, there are scads of govt and private programs of varying assistance for all of us. But, you must take the first step. Or, you can sit at a corner and beg. I would encourage you to seek help through any local veterans organization. We will welcome you with open arms and immediate to long term assistance. So, move out soldier and link up with your veteran friends who can and will help you get back on your feet. You found the internet…so, you are certainly capable of more.

      BTW, I have five combat ribbons from Grenada, Panama, Gulf 1, Iraq and Afghanistan. I served in 1st Ranger Bn, 10th SF, and finished my career at JSOC. I suffer from PTSD, hyper-sensitivity and a few other problems. But, I do not blame my govt or my Army. I chose to defend my Constitution from all enemies, and did so proudly. Today I still serve our Armed Forces and volunteer as much time helping out at our homeless vet shelter in DC. Maybe you should rethink your position and become part of the solution, not the problem.

  • disabled vet

    As a vet from 1969 to 1971, I can agree, we were and are treated badly…the rift in the country was healed, by paving over us, the results: injured and dead Americans, forbidden to win, forbidden to lose. You can bet I never saw a town come out to welcome me home, and I mean no disparagement to those serving today. We were just as committed, just as young, just as strong as you, and God Bless you all in the military. We won those wars. come home.

    As for bad judges, the posse is just behind them. Bad and immoral judges will eventually get it. It gets dark every night.

    • Jeep

      disabled vet, please rest assured that your remarks are not diparaging! Your service is still greatly appreciated by those of us who came after you. The military did not pave over you. On the contrary, you laid a foundation for a strong and capable force that has its roots in the path you blazed before us. Soldiers today are certainly reaping the benefit of a shamed public that treated returning heros from Vietnam with contempt and violence. Again, thanks for your service and continued support.

      • Alex

        Why on Earth do you appreciate any U.S. troops serving in Vietnam?

        While I sympathize with ‘disabled vet’ if her or his disability was the result of the war, s/he should never have been there to begin with.

        It is high time to stop slapping the title “hero” on every person that joins the military—these are people who have consigned the very grave decision over life and death to ANOTHER PERSON! God will certainly damn those who kill because “they were ordered to”—after all, this is what the Crips and the Bloods do.

        • http://?? Joe H.

          Alex,
          Want your koolaid to be a little sweeter? Stir in a little syrup of ipecac!!! you need to disgorge a little of that BS you have lodged in your craw!!

  • disabled vet

    Jeep, for some reason, that brought me a good feeling of peace. Thank you.

  • Alex

    We know with certainty that we have executed some innocent people. We know that advances in the science of criminal investigation have shown that “eyewitness” testimony is often errant. In the particular case of Troy Davis, in which there was no physical evidence linking him to the crime, many of the witnesses against him have recanted or changed their testimony. Crystal, of course, says that two years had passed before the recantations. So what, there is expiration date on the Truth?

    For these reasons there was simply too much doubt to TAKE A MAN’S LIFE. Too much doubt.

    Ben Crystal repeats the meme that since the “Jim Crow era is dead” and we have a Black man in the White Guy’s House there is no longer a Race Issue in the country. Far from true.

    Reading through the blogs and the letters to the editors it is very easy to see how far the White Estates of Amerika has advanced—about six feet. The racial vitriol and epithets directed at Black criminals or suspects is horrible, but when a Caucasian is charged with a terrible crime, Race is never mentioned. It’s kind of a White thing, the way we will note the race of the people we encounter in the day-to-day, unless they are White. “I saw this Black guy today…..” “This Black lady I work with….” “There were two Mexicans in front of me….” How come we never say “There was this White lady crossing the street…”?

    Of note: the bereaved family of James Byrd, texecuted by truck-dragging, asked that the life of the man sentenced to die for the crime on the same night that Davis was killed, be spared. The family of heroic Officer McPhail, driven by pain and anger, demanded the death of Davis, despite the very obvious questions about the case.

  • Clint

    Coercion, collusion and subversion. If any of these words mean anything to our society it shows how it is possible to pervert our nations principals and bring us to a state of dystopia. I am vaguely familiar with this court case but, from the limited information that I reviewed it seemed that there was a reasonable doubt and the fact that witnesses recanted their testimonies would also influence the jurors decisions regarding guilt. We have to seriously reassess our individual values and decide if they are our own or if they have been shaped and manipulated by social engineers to benifit a small group of extremely wealthy families so they can implement their masterplan.

  • chuckb

    all you bleeding hearts can bow down on your rug and pray, they just eliminated the scumbag, good riddance.

    • eddie47d

      Another Conservative jumps the gun and automatically goes for the rope. Right Chuck??Did you know that Sylvester “Redd” Coles admitted to the killing of MacPhail and Troy Davis never did. Judge Wm T Moore Jr. said it didn’t matter. We’ve heard about Southern justice before so I wouldn’t be bragging about this one either.

      • Alex

        You are correct, eddie47d.

        ?chuckb–what is with the rug reference?

        • chuckb

          alex=eddie, it was my understanding there were absolute witness to this shooting so don’t give me the doubt bit.
          as far as the rug comment, i didn’t want you bleeding hearts to bruise your knees while you mourned the loss of the scumbag. faux that.

      • independant thinker

        But the feds who are known for overturning Southern court decisions NOT for upholding them upheld the Georgia courts. In light of this it is logical to conclude he was in fact guilty.

        • eddie47d

          Too much pressure to save money and an innocent man be damned. 64% 0f Americans approve of the death penalty and mitigating factors don’t mean a thing to them.Those Judges have to face those majority voters so they just want to get it over with.

          • independant thinker

            And just which federal judges are elected and would have to worry about public opinion eddie.

  • http://pauljbosco.com Paul J. Bosco

    I gather that, for 50 or so years, Mr. Crystal was a strong and vocal supporter of the NAACP. And then he was born, and discovered they had become racists.

    His belief in this man’s guilt, and his support for execution, seems mostly informed by the displeasure he imagines it causes liberals. He finds a moral equivalence between the death penalty and “Heather Has Two Moms”.

    I don’t call people “racist” lightly. It’s not right to misrepresent what a person is at his core; to assume some right to define others. But Crystal is a pig, not just a racist.

    I am hardly shocked by the right-wing crap spewed by so many of the commenters. It’s encouraging that others understand that “reasonable doubt” and the obligation of the State to prove guilt –not the need for the accused to prove innocence– are precious rights, not liberal claptrap. It’s amazing how many right-wingers who distrust their goavernment completely nonetheless are confident they will never need these rights. It’s amazing how they suddenly believe in governmental infallibility when a man,of any race or ethnicity, is convicted and/or executed.

    The State arrogates to itself the power to terminate a citizen’s most important right, the right to life itself. How odd to find such fervent support for this, in a forum devoted to Libertarian politics.

    –Paul J. Bosco
    Manhattan

    • Alex

      Very well said, Mister Bosco.

      Mister Crystalnacht does, as you point out, enjoy the displeasure he causes thinking people. I cannot deny that I, too, try to ruffle the Reich Wing feathers here, but I do so from an informed and thoughtful position, different from the neo-conartist talking points most readers here suck from the Faux Noose gaspipe.

  • Jay

    I think this has more to do with the issue of the death penalty, rather then guilt or innocent. Ok fine! Let’s for argument’s sake, agree that the man committed a heinous crime against humanity, and is guilty beyond a shadow of a doubt. Who here would vote to put the man to death?

    • http://?? Joe H.

      Jay,
      i have the cahones to say I would!! the criminals in this society have many more rights than their victims as it is and now the bleeding hearts here would give them even more!
      Point in FACT. we have a guy just down the street from us that raped a handicapped girl at gunpoint. never mind the fact that it was a pellet gun, the girl thought it was real. I repeat, she was handicapped. this animal got six months and a year of probation! Poor booby! Never mind the fact that Ohio has a law that REQUIRES seven years for committing ANY crime with a gun. The girl was in fear for her life, and was raped!!! Where is HER justice for the ANIMAL that raped her???

      • Palin12

        Joe H,
        We have a 19 year old guy here in Nevada that just two weeks ago stabbed a 15 year old girl (that he didn’t even know) 4o times, raped her, killed her, set her body on fire and dumped her body. A poster boy for capital punishment if there ever was one.

        • Jay

          JoeH, and Palin12, I think that for some extreme cases, where the crime is so heinous, the death penalty should be administered. Either that, or keep the perpetrator locked up, indefinitely. It is well and good, to make certain that the person be guilty beyond a shadow of a doubt, subsequently, however, once absolute guilt is established, justice, and to the public safety provide, therefore, must be administered!

          • http://?? Joe H.

            Jay,
            The death penalty is the only guaranteed deterrent to repeat offenders!!

  • Clint

    I am astounded to find so many posts that favor human sacrifice. Thankfully there have been several reasonable people voicing their opinions as well. We are all part of a social experiment. The overwhelming majority have had their perceptions shaped through education with operant conditioning tactics. Thus, combined with the assault of mainstream media propaganda is there any wonder why our moral standards have eroded. Virtually everyone has been affected negatively, including myself. Personally, if faced with an imminent threat I would protect my person and all other potential victims with force as needed. This does not mean that if we find someone guilty of a heinous crime against humanity that a court/government/parole board/judge/society has the right to extinguish that persons life. This case is merely viewed by the internationally wealthy banking sociopaths to measure the moral fabric of society. We have to stand united and agree on certain character traits that will define our society. Inalienable rights are only viable if you believe in creation, or a higher power than humans. If you falsely believe that humans are mere animals than you have no inalienable rights and your government will decide what rights you can and can’t have.

    • Jay

      Clint, i think you will find this to be an eye opener. As well, it will confirm the statement concerning the internationally wealthy banking sociopaths!

    • Jay

      Clint, i think you will find this to be an eye opener. As well, it will confirm the statement concerning the internationally wealthy banking sociopaths!

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7HbEUnd1iqQ

      • Clint

        Thanks for posting that link Jay. Very informative and I plan on reading William Stuarts book The Invisible College. Hopefully more people will snap out of the spell that has been put on them and spend time informing themselves with untainted sources.

  • Jay

    Lawton: Troy Davis verdict correct
    Posted: October 18, 2008 – 11:30pm
    By spencer lawton jr.

    Many people are concerned that an innocent man is about to be put to death. I know this, and I understand it. I am not likewise concerned, however, and I want to explain why.

    The only information the public has had in the 17 years since Troy Davis’ conviction has been generated by people ideologically opposed to the death penalty, regardless of the guilt or innocence of the accused.

    While they have shouted, we have been silent. The canons of legal ethics prohibit a lawyer – prosecutor and defense counsel alike – from commenting publicly, or engineering public comments, on the issue of guilt or innocence in a pending criminal case.

    Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled, the case is over, and I can try to tell our side.

    First , Davis’ advocates have insisted that there was no physical evidence in the case. This is not true.

    Crime lab tests proved that the shell casings recovered from the shooting of Michael Cooper at a party earlier in the evening were fired from the same weapon as the casings recovered from the scene of Officer Mark MacPhail’s murder. Davis was convicted of shooting Cooper.

    And, while it isn’t physical evidence, consider the “testimony” of Officer MacPhail himself: When he comes to the rescue of a homeless man being harassed and pistol-whipped, the officer ran past Sylvester Coles on his way to catch Davis. This makes Davis the only one of those two with a motive to shoot Officer MacPhail. Yet Davis’ lawyers argue to condemn Coles for shooting MacPhail. Why would he?

    In fact, Davis’ advocates are eager to condemn Coles based on evidence far weaker than their characterization of the evidence against Davis. Where is their sense of fairness? This is the same Sylvester Coles who promptly presented himself to police, and who was advised by counsel to tell all that he knew – with his lawyer not even present. Which he did. No lawyer who even faintly suspects a client of criminal conduct would let him talk to the police without counsel.

    Second , they claim that seven of nine witnesses have recanted their trial testimony. This is not believable.

    To be sure, they’ve produced affidavits; a few handwritten and apparently voluntarily and spontaneous, except for concluding with “further the affiant sayeth not.” Who wrote that stuff? The lawyers, perhaps?

    The law is understandably skeptical of post-trial “newly-discovered evidence.”

    Such evidence as these affidavits might, for example, be paid for, or coerced, or the product of fading memory.

    If every verdict could be set aside by the casual acceptance of a witness’s changing his mind or suggesting uncertainty, decades after the event, it is easy to see how many cases would have to be tried at least twice (perhaps ad infinitum).

    Thus the law sets strict standards for such “newly discovered” evidence.

    For example, it cannot be for a lack of diligence that the new evidence was not discovered sooner, and the defendant is expected to present that evidence at the earliest possible time.

    Yet these affidavits were not offered in a motion for new trial until eight days before the first scheduled execution in 2008 seventeen years after Davis’ conviction. If this affidavit evidence was so compelling, why didn’t they rush to seek a new trial in 2003 when they had most of the affidavits they now rely upon? Or collect those affidavits earlier?

    Each of the now-”recanting” witnesses was closely questioned at trial by lawyers representing Davis, specifically on the question whether they were in any way pressured or coerced by police in giving their statements or testimony. All denied it.

    And while an 80 percent recantation rate – the first in the history of the world ? – may seem to some as overwhelmingly persuasive, to others of us it invites a suggestion of uncanny coincidence, making it very difficult to believe.

    Third , they claim that their “newly discovered evidence” (i.e., the recantations) hasn’t been adequately considered by the courts. This is not true.

    The affidavits, in various combinations, had already been reviewed by 29 judges in seven different types of review, over the course of 17 years, before Tuesday’s ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court.

    The state Parole Board halted the execution in 2007, saying they wouldn’t allow a possibly innocent man to be executed. Then, after more than a year of reviewing all of the evidence on both sides, and hearing from every witness Davis’ lawyers presented – including Davis – they refused to grant clemency.

    The trial was fair. Davis was represented by superbly skilled criminal defense lawyers. He was convicted by a fair jury (seven black and five white). The post conviction stridency we’ve seen has been much about the death penalty and little about Troy Davis.

    The jury found that Davis, after shooting another man earlier in the evening, murdered a police officer who came to the rescue of a homeless man Davis had beaten. Mark MacPhail had never even drawn his weapon.

    A more complete discussion of these – and other – points can be found at Chathamcounty.org/vwap/html

    Spencer Lawton Jr. is Chatham County District Attorney.

    • http://pauljbosco.com Paul J. Bosco

      Mr. Lawton is not impartial, as is understandable, but also he is not convincing. It is hardly usual for 7 of 9 witnesses to recant. And we know, now more than ever, that eyewitness testimony is very problematic.

      It is also not usual for a former President and for Reagan’s FBI head to get involved.

      Even if the defendant was found guilty, the “beyond a reasonable doubt” requirement for conviction is not a high enough standard for the State to kill a prisoner. When an innocent is executed, the State is committing murder in our name. Can anyone justify an “error rate” of even 1%, to save public expense and –supposedly– deter would-be murderers, when Life-Without-Parole –a stronger deterrant?–is the alternative? (And far cheaper, preserving resources for police, prosecutors and courts.)

      Lawton is more concerned about an increase in his workload, from post-trial evidence, than he is about actual innocence. That is the dirty, open secret about our sometimes-corrupt but always creaky-and-underfunded criminal justice system. The system is much more interested in RESOLUTION than in justice.

      –Paul J. Bosco
      Manhattan

  • DaveH

    Something for the sheeple to think about. Just for argument sake, let’s assume that Troy is definitely guilty. How many of us ordinary folk would Troy have had to kill to get the death penalty?
    The Government protects its own. What else can you expect from the biggest Gang in the land?

  • Rick Beatty

    I think that the “sleepy-time” needle treatment is a bit short of the mark in regards to SUITABLE punishment for such trash.

    Maybe, we should consider injecting other… “more interesting” chemicals…

    • Palin12

      sulfuric acid would be interesting!

  • bob wire

    We have learned over the years our eyes lie to us as they fail to offer “truth”. My eyes, your eyes ` every ones eyes.

    So it worth the time to weigh out “all the facts” and not heavily depend on visual witness.

    Here a interesting “watch” ~ attempt to stay connected until the end.

    http://www.wimp.com/secretsites/

    In any case the people have all spoken and justice has been carried out.

    • Jay

      bw, very interesting and informative video presentation! I agree, that more often the not, our vision, or perception(s) is guided and determined by our biases, ideology, philosophy, upbringing, education, personal preferences, ect.. Of that there can be no doubt! The media, most certainly, has perfected the science of ambiguity, by using visual imagery accompanied by self-serving narrative to create and cement desired perception. This, of course, is nothing short of travesty! It is often difficult to determine fact from fiction with respect to truth, in particular, to outside observers regarding, in this case, the innocence, or guilt of Mr. Troy Anthony Davis. I suppose we should apply some measure of faith in our, often corrupt and manipulated justice system, which, at times, and on this we can all agree, does manage to appropriate justice! But taking into consideration the inconsistency of human nature, the desire for perfection, therefore, is unattainable!

  • Hazel Bonner

    I have read most of the postings and I do oppose the death penalty under any circumstances. If the DP is a deterrent then why is the murder rate higher by far in states with the DP, like South Dakota. Not just the NAACP, but every agency and organization going opposed this execution because of all the doubt. I am a free lance writer who has been studying this case for the past ten years. I have looked at much evidence and there was little that was said here that was true. Two who did not recant were the person likely to have killed officer MacPhail who of couse disposed of the gun. There was literally no evidence that Troy Davis was the killer. The doubt in this case was most reasonable and Troy Davis should not have died with all that doubt. You all need to educate yourself about the DP. I have and I oppose it under any circumstance and believe that America would be better off without it, and we would save the huge amount of money on all of the appeals. Were you aware that the jury, most of them, came to believe that Troy should not be executed. I also opposed the death of the man in Texas who was convicted of the dragging death of a black man – one of only a few whites who killed blacks to be executed. This whole posting of the ugly remarks is not very educational but very significant in that it tells where people are and most don’t care enough to really look at a case. So much of what has been said is simply not true, but most do not care about truth. I cannot convince you and you cannot convince me, so lets just stop trying. The DP is simply wrong. Why are we the only developed country that still has it? Aren’t we proud to join countries like Iran and other third world countries? We should just end the death penalty now and save much money in order to educate our children about violence and cause a real deterrence. I don’t know if you saw that Governor Perry has presided over many executions, one of whom was also innocent. I do believe that the death of Troy Davis in our name, will finally mobilize the opponents of the DP. Because this death was carried out in our name and we should not crow about it but hang our heads. Please use my real name here, I will not hide behind the kinds of names that you use. Abolish the death penalty and use the money for worthy things like educating our children. There are many other innocent persons on death rows in this country and I worked on a death row, so please I have looked at much evidence and know that we just need to abolish the death penalty and end the race to become rich, because the gap between the rich and the poor is wider than it has ever been. So just abolish the DP, and use the money for good things, instead of the meanness and evil posted in most of these postings.

    • http://gunner689 gunner689

      Hazel: There was plenty of evidence against Troy Davis, including the eye-witness testimony of 32 persons including many who knew him personally. Every court of appeal including the Supreme Court found in favor of his death penalty. Time and again murders who are released from prison go on to murder again. The anti-death penalty people and the parole boards who release them, have those victims blood on their hands.
      As a pro-death penalty advocate for heinious murders I would be willing to make a concession. I would agree to abolish the death penalty for the guilty if the death penalty for the innocent, abortion was also aboloishied. Furthermore those who should be on death row are never released from prison and spend the rest of their lives in solitary confinement. Deal ??

  • Pastori Balele

    I have written several times that I believe Americans are now politically and socially matured. Americans elected Obama, a racial minority, as President and US and the world cried for happiness to see Americans had changed. However, I now believe there are a few elements of people that still hate Blacks and racial minorities. Your organization is one of them. Troy should have been given another hearing for his sentence. Other groups are GOP and TEA party leaders and FoxNews. Cain won Florida straw poll but we are hearing GOP, TEA Party and right wing media leaders have plans to fight Cain so he does not win GOP nomination. Leaders of this fight are Bill, Hannity, Ingraham, Megan and Rush, Mitch, Boehner. These have declared war on Cain. And I don’t know what they get from hating Blacks and other racial minorities. To destroy their hatred, I am asking America to re-elect President Obama. This will silence these haters for ever.

    • http://gunner689 gunner689

      Not many people in the GOP hate blacks unlike the multitudes in the Dem. party that hate whites. The problem is not race it is BO’s philosophy and ideas of how gvt. should operate and control the American people. BO’s methods are based on pure socialism and that’s what Americans hate. To say that it’s race is a typical remark of a shallow thinker.

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