Judge tosses suit seeking to ban Federal funding for stem cell research

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A district judge recently tossed out a legal challenge to federal stem cell research funding.A Federal judge recently threw out a lawsuit challenging the use of government funds for human embryonic stem cell research.

U.S. District Judge Royce C. Lamberth had previously stopped the government funding of the controversial research because it may have been in violation of the Dickey-Wicker Amendment, which bans public funds from being used in research where an embryo is harmed, according to Bloomberg. However, an appeals court ruled that such funding was most likely lawful and allowed the research to resume while Lamberth further considered the case.

“The court’s determination that it is bound by the D.C. Circuit’s conclusion that ‘research’ in the Dickey-Wicker Amendment is ambiguous as a matter of law is buttressed by the fact that plaintiffs haven’t offered any new information or reasoning that was unavailable to the D.C. Circuit,” Lamberth stated in his recent ruling.

Lamberth also said he was bound by the appeals court ruling.

The lawsuit that sought to put an end to the funding was brought by two doctors against the U.S. Health and Human Services Department and the National Institutes of Health.

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